Daily Fashion News

Justin Bieber is trying to prove to Selena Gomez that he's a

Wednesday, November 1 2017

Justin Bieber is trying to prove to Selena Gomez that he's a

Justin Bieber is trying to prove to Selena Gomez that he's a "very different person" Justin and Selena Gomez are friends again By Lilian Min November 1, 2017 SHARE Based on sources galore, it's a coincidence that Selena Gomez and The Weeknd have split after ten months of dating , right after Selena and her ex-boyfriend Justin Bieber were spotted going to church together . (Though it's a pretty patented Biebs hangout move .) But according to People , Justin knows he's got a long way to go in getting Selena's family and friends back on board with their own relationship, friendship or otherwise. One Bieber "pal" shared: "Justin is aware Selena’s family is not thrilled they are hanging out. They think he caused Selena a lot of grief. Justin hopes he can prove to them that he has changed. He has changed a lot in the past few months. He is a very different person. They have a lot to talk about and are having fun catching up." In many accounts of the two's rekindled friendship, Justin and Selena reconnected after he learned of her kidney transplant earlier this year. They'd formally split up after four years of dating in 2014. Meanwhile, eagle-eyed social media users have noticed that the Weeknd (Abel Tesfaye) has unfollowed , among other Instagram accounts, Selena's mother, her BFF (and kidney donor) Francia Raisa, her assistant Theresa Mingus, and various #Abelena fan accounts, as well as removing and deleting other traces (likes) of his now-ex. As of now, he still follows Selena herself though.

The one place you should sit on a plane if you want the best service

Wednesday, November 1 2017

The one place you should sit on a plane if you want the best service

There are lots of factors that come into where we choose to sit on a plane. They might vary according to how fearful a flier we are, how late we are at booking our seat, or our preference when it comes to window and aisle seats. But according to some cabin crew, there is another important factor that we might be missing from our list, and that's where we'll get the best service. Of course, if you've got the money for it, then the best service will always be at the very front of the plane in first or business class, but if you're flying economy, apparently where you sit could make a difference, too. Flight attendant Annie Kingston told Oyster : "While most passengers tend to choose seats that are at the front of the aircraft, so that they can disembark first and have a better chance of securing their preferred meal option, flight attendants know that if you're sitting towards the back, you'll receive the most attentive service." "The reason is simple: We like to avoid responding to call bells from the front of the plane because answering one means potentially flaunting whatever item the passenger has requested to everyone else along the way." "This can cause a problem since planes often don't have enough extra vodka, pillows, earplugs, and toothbrushes, or the time on shorter flights to deviate from the service schedule. For passengers sitting near the back of the plane, however, it's much easier to slip in that second mini bottle of wine."

The struggles of cleaning up a 30-year-old Indian home

Wednesday, November 1 2017

The struggles of cleaning up a 30-year-old Indian home

YOU HAVE READ OF 10 STORIES THIS MONTH 30 day free access to digital issues worth INR 400 Get it now ! Image: Shutterstock In India, homes are usually given thorough airing-out towards the end of the year (around the festive season) in a fall ‘spring cleaning’ of sorts. This is the time when we discover hidden corners in our tiny Bombay apartments we forgot existed. And in the overhaul, the stuff we keep back gives an insight into the kind of people we really are (passive hoarders). To give you some context, I live by myself in my parents’ old apartment—a flat that has over 30 years’ worth of knickknacks and artefacts that my family has collected over years of life and travels, much of which hasn’t even been touched for 29 years. This year, I took it upon myself to declutter—little did I know then of the war I was about to start. Here are just a few of the ‘interesting’ things I came across in my year-end spruce up. – I can’t give away some 40-odd unused, brown and old Pearl Pet jars—because I “may need them someday,” according to my mom, and she can’t use them because she has shiny new ones. Excuse me, I want glass mason jars. I want those cute ceramic jars that have ‘Salt’ and ‘Sugar’ painted on them. Not dark brown, plastic, Pearl Pet jars. You can barely even see the colourful dals and grains in them. But as all Indian kids know all too well, the moms-and-containers situation is one you’ll never win. – I found a vest that belongs to my father. I have never seen him wear the vest, and thank God. I can only assume my mom didn’t want to waste some leftover fabric from upholstering a couch, so she got it made into tiny cushions and the vest. Why this still exists in a corner of the home, I have no idea. – We have two giant pressure cookers—and by giant, I mean you would buy them if you have a catering business. The funny thing is we only ever had one big party in this home, and that time we had it catered from outside. – We have saved every single gift box we get during Diwali and with wedding invitations in case we want to re-gift them. The only issue? We give kharchi or money as gifts every year. – We have an actual office chair at home for some reason—I can’t even… – My Kolhapuris from eight years ago. – We have saved all the curtains we bought from Fab India over the past 15 years. I don’t know why. We are not even those cool DIY-loving people who turn old curtains into great Halloween outfits use them to start an upcycled clothing brand. – We have two broken rice cookers and we haven’t thrown them away because we got them from Japan when I was an infant. *shrug emoji* – Found that bag of paper and cloth bags and more bags of other kinds of bags in a giant bag—the one which we can never find when we actually need a bag. – I found my first onesie—cute! Well that one’s a keeper. In this story: Bag, Diwali, India Now Playing: What not to say to a model

This new belt trend is right in time for the party season

Wednesday, November 1 2017

This new belt trend is right in time for the party season

Belt, Gucci Belt, Magda Butrym While our love for the western belt may not be completely over, it looks like our accessory wardrobe has a new addition that could work with everything. The skinny chain belt has taken over the fall 2017 runways, and should also be making its way into your closet, too. The easy part here is that you can wear it in multiple different way. Dress up your white T-shirt and blue jeans pairing with a delicate gold chain belt. For more drama, you can even layer the belts, as seen in on the Moschino runway. Winter might be coming up, but that’s no excuse to lose out on style. Wear that oversized coat, and accentuate your waist by throwing on a belt that doubles up as jewellery. Go ahead and take your pick from our selection of this season’s must-have accessory.

How yoga and meditation can make you more intuitive

Wednesday, November 1 2017

How yoga and meditation can make you more intuitive

YOU HAVE READ OF 10 STORIES THIS MONTH 30 day free access to digital issues worth INR 400 Get it now ! Image: Vikram Kushwah Call it gut instinct or a hunch, but all of us are born with a sense of intuition. It can save your life or steer you away from a destructive relationship. It’s all about how to listen to it and eventually follow its guidance. Dr Sayantani Mukerjee, consultant psychiatrist at Columbia Asia Hospital in Pune, says that intuition is a sum total of our subconscious signals. “There are a lot of things we process subconsciously that get filtered through the conscious mind and remain in the primal parts of the brain.” She says that when we get an intuitive signal, it’s like information from our subconscious brain falling into place just like pieces in a puzzle. However, sometimes what we think is intuition could just be an impulse. So how does one know that it’s real intuition that’s giving us a warning signal? Dr Mukerjee talks about the HPA (hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis) that sets off a series of very physical signals. “You could get a bad feeling accompanied by physical symptoms like a flutter in the heart, a jolt in the stomach.” This is because of the subconscious information in your brain. A paper published in 2008 in Science Daily on the subject of intuition gives the example of an F1 driver who suddenly felt an urge to brake midway. When he braked it saved his life because up ahead was a huge accident where cars were piled up. When he underwent a forensic analysis, psychologists showed him his video footage to understand why he had that sudden urge or ‘instinct’ to brake. In hindsight, the driver realised that the way the crowds were screaming, or the direction in which they were looking was highly abnormal. Therefore, he got the signal from his subconscious to stop. With such extreme benefits, it would be amazing to have a strong sense of intuition. “The ancient yogis through their meditation were trying to expand their consciousness and intuition,” says Dr Mukerjee. “To follow your instincts, you have to free your mind of bias, logic and opinions of your mother and the media,” she says. Secondly, she explains that you have to observe the signals around you and your own reactions. However, modern science provides no real method or practice to sharpen this sixth sense. We spoke to Delhi-based vinyasa yoga master Bindiya Sabherwal about methods that can enhance your instincts. She echoes Dr Mukerjee’s thoughts by saying, “Intuition is something that comes from deep within, uninfluenced by someone else—it is the ultimate truth and the reality.” And while many people work on meditative practices to open up the intuitive mind, it all begins with kriya yoga according to Sabherwal. “By following kriya yoga you burn impurities, which leads to a clear mind.” The real need, she says, is to understand what is real and what isn’t. Unfortunately, in today’s world, we are all surrounded by an illusion of materialistic excess, and it is very easy to get lost into the outside world. “All of us are born with intuitive capabilities but we can only refine them by following yogic principles and looking inwards,” says Sabherwal. She talks about basic yogic ethics, principles and practices that will all together give you a strong sense of intuition. The yamas These are the moral guidelines to practicing yoga. You don’t become a yogi just by practicing asana and breathing. You first need to follow these universal laws to really and truly become yogic. They are: ahimsa (non-violence), satya (speaking out truthfulness), asteya (non-stealing of things and even ideas), brahmacharya (practicing moderation or controlling physical impulses), and apigraha (using only what we need). The niyamas Once we follow the above ethics, it brings us to the five yogic practices. Shaucha (physical and mental cleanliness), santosha (contentment in what we have), tapas (self-discipline), svadhyaya (self-study, why we think and behave the way we do), and ishavara pranidhana (devotion and surrender to a higher power). Following the act After this you are ready for asana practice, pranayama and meditation. “You cannot meditate and hope to improve your intuition without following the yamas and niyamas because your mind will not be polished,” says Sabherwal. Once you practice making these changes in your behaviour, your intuition will already be enhanced because it will come from a place of truth and clarity. However, warns Sabherwal, polishing your intuition and following it are two different things. “It takes guts to even follow your inner guidance. So many times, we know that something is not good for us, but we still do it because it would make us unpopular with others.” (To meditate to improve intuition, look at our guide to third-eye meditation ). Vasudha Rai is a certified yoga teacher and has been writing on beauty, health and wellness for 15 years.

Mumbai now has a Korean beauty facial, and it is absolute luxury

Wednesday, November 1 2017

Mumbai now has a Korean beauty facial, and it is absolute luxury

In my quest for flawless skin, there’s nothing I wouldn’t try once. Except maybe a Vampire facial—it’s too gory for my liking. There are few things as relaxing and comforting as a good facial. I like mine served as a combination of high tech and hands on, and my new-found love comes all the way from Korea, where pretty much all skincare innovations are born. The AgeLess Luxury Seoul Glow Facial uses products from Shangpree, the Korean brand that beauty editors, bloggers and supermodels around the world are in love with. It kicks off with meticulous cleansing that moves on swiftly to skin resurfacing, which involves using a diamond tip to slough away dead skin (microdermabrasion). On skin, it feels like a mini vacuum cleaner has been let loose on your face to polish it to perfection. Next up is a routine cleanup, which my aesthetician Mercy declares “unnecessary” for me. No blackheads or white, is the best news I’ve got in weeks. We move on to step four (my most favourite one), massage with Shangpree’s S-Energy Hydro cream. The only two words I need to describe the next thirty minutes—pure bliss! Mercy slathers my skin with their cream—a blend of macadamia seed, rosewood and camellia oils and concentrates on releasing tension from my face, neck, shoulders and upper back. The often-neglected décolletage gets some special TLC as well. The massage usually clocks in at 20 minutes, but in my case, it stretched well over 30 thanks to the special instructions by Dr Harshna Bijlani—it’s like you read my mind. I’m a firm believer in facial massages—the new age, machine-only facials that eliminate the need for the warm touch of your aesthetician’s fingers are criminal, in my opinion. The finale is gold, no really. The outstanding climax to this two hour extravaganza is Shangpree’s Caviar Gold Mask. Four years in the making, the mask—a blend of gold, caviar, jojoba, ginseng, silk amino acids to name a few luxurious ingredients—is left on for 15 minutes (until dry) to firm up and infuse skin with tons of nourishment. Next—no we are not done yet—Mercy massages in a hydrating serum and covers my face with a device that can only be described as a mini MRI machine. It’s the LED light therapy device, which works by emitting infrared light to address specific skin concerns. I got the red light which is used to promote circulation and reduce inflammation, acne-prone girls get the blue one. It’s all painless, but the warm light feels very soothing; I think I dozed off for those 10-12 minutes. I woke up with skin that looked like it had gulped down gallons of water. A good facial brings a glow to the face, but a great one makes your soul sing—this one was the perfect melody. The AgeLess Luxury Seoul Glow Facial costs Rs 3,950.

How to lose weight during the party season: diet tips and a quick workout

Wednesday, November 1 2017

How to lose weight during the party season: diet tips and a quick workout

From Diwali to the wedding season, all up to New Year’s, you probably already have been and will continue to be bombarded with decadent meals and nights of excessive drinking, which work entirely against your weight loss and diet plan. This also makes maintaining that summer body you worked so hard on, very challenging. Former lawyer, fitness enthusiast and SOHFIT founder Sohrab Khushrushahi (who was also featured in our first ever Vogueathon in January this year) gives us his top tips on keeping fit during the party season, staying on board a weight loss plan, and the workout to squeeze in between those parties. Khushrushahi’s diet rules to lose weight Eat homemade food before stepping out. It helps cut out the number of unhealthy calories you will consume when you’re actually out, since your stomach is already full. If you’re on a diet but have to eat out, choose your food groups wisely to make sure you don’t steer off your weight loss plan. Put in extra time at the gym to burn off the excess calories and lose weight. Stay active and hydrated at all times—they’re the key to weight loss and maintaining a successful diet plan. Don’t binge-eat, no matter how tempted you are. Take a bite, satiate your senses and move on. Khushrushahi’s workout for weight loss The biggest issues that come in the way of your resolution to lose weight is that you either don’t have time for an hour-long session at the gym, or are travelling and don’t have access to fitness equipment. But that doesn’t need to come in the way of your weight loss goals. Khushrushahi recommends an intense, effective and quick workout you can squeeze into even the busiest of days. “What I love doing is a quick 20-minute Tabata burst when I’m travelling or out and don’t have access to a gym,” he says. “Each exercise in a given Tabata workout lasts for four minutes. The structure of the program is as follows: work out hard for 20 seconds, rest for 10 seconds. You push yourself as hard as you can for 20 seconds and rest for the next 10. This is one set. You’ll complete eight sets of each exercise (4 minutes) so pick five exercises to work out for a total of 20 minutes. You can do pretty much any exercise you wish. I mix and match between any of the following exercises—squats, push-ups, burpees, pull ups, suicide runs, sit ups, toes to bar, knees to elbows, inverted rows or any other exercise that works your large muscle groups.” Contact Sohrab Khushrushahi at [email protected]

Samyukta Nair’s new store is like nothing you’ve seen before

Wednesday, November 1 2017

Samyukta Nair’s new store is like nothing you’ve seen before

To her already impressive to-do list which includes running a Michelin-starred restaurant , a burgeoning hotel chain and a sleepwear label favourited by the country’s It girls, Samyukta Nair is adding a concept store located in the arterial lanes of Mumbai. Vogue sits down with the ardent multitasker on her latest venture, Clove. Take us through the new store. What’s your favourite aspect? The idea was to make the space feel like a home. For me, coming from the hospitality industry the experience of it was essential. With retail in India, you come in, you shop and you leave. In Europe, you can go into smaller places that are well decorated and you can sort of wander. So, I collaborated and ideated with Zameer Basrai from The Busride Design Studio to give the space a European, chic and sophisticated aesthetic. My favourite aspect is the structure, it’s intimate. What was one of the biggest challenges you faced while setting up the space? I think the biggest challenge was just getting the smaller details in order. We’ve got a deconstructed chandelier, so getting the placement of that right was tough but it all worked out. What, according to you, are three things every woman should own from the store? Ikka Dukka’s tea set, pyjamas from Dandelion and something from the bath and body section which includes products from brands like Pure Earth, Junaili and Bare Necessities. I brought those brands in because they are inherently Indian. India is the land of Ayurveda and for the foreigner that walks in, it’s something different and it’s nice to have that showcase of the country. What are some of the other labels in the store? The idea was not to take contemporary Indian designers and be another stockist. I wanted to take a more holistic approach to Indian retail and give people the platform to do things that maybe they want to try and but haven’t had the chance to. So, we have Nimish Shah who has done Shift men and Shift home, which is exciting. There’s also Anavila home. How has this been different from what you do with the restaurant and the hotel? I think the aesthetic is inherently different. It’s a lot simpler and reminiscent of an earthy India, compared to the Leela for example, which is modern. However, intrinsically they all speak the same language. They sell the India story. What’s next in the pipeline? Bombay Bustle, that’s my second restaurant in London. It opens in November. Again, it’s very influenced by Mumbai and encapsulates the city’s culture, milieu and comfort. I wanted to bring to London the food we enjoy but people there don’t know about like Chole Bhature. Also, the chef Rohit Ghai is fantastic and has great recipes passed down from his mother. Address: Clove, 2 Churchill Chambers, Allana Road, Colaba

Deepika Padukone’s bodycon kurta puts a sultry spin on ethnic wear

Wednesday, November 1 2017

Deepika Padukone’s bodycon kurta puts a sultry spin on ethnic wear

Deepika Padukone in Sabyasachi Image: Instagram.com/Shaleenanathani Fans of Deepika Padukone are all gearing up for the release of her upcoming film Padmavati , which releases next month. Sartorially, we are keeping a close watch on her wardrobe choices (especially those ethnic wear pieces) while doing the promotional rounds for her movie. Yesterday the actor was spotted attending the 3D trailer launch of her upcoming period drama. After sporting a floral sari last week , yesterday Padukone continued to champion yet another Sabyasachi look for the Mumbai event. Taking a break from drapes, this time the actor switched it up in a black bodycon kurta with beadwork details paired with crisp white churidar. The sheer organza dupatta featured an extended embellished border, demonstrating how a heavy dupatta can elevate an ensemble with basic silhouettes. Adding colour to her black-and-silver ensemble were Padukone’s oversized red and green kundan earrings by Amarpali Jewels, and silver strappy heels by Christian Louboutin x Sabyasachi collaboration that matched her elegant ensemble. She kept her beauty look sleek and elegant with thick eyeliner, black bindi, baby pink lips and hair tied in a neat bun. While picking up your next-so-basic outfit, take tips from Padukone’s ensemble and elevate your simple ensemble with an embellished dupatta and oversized accessories. Check out the slideshow for a closer look at Deepika Padukone’s ensemble. Keep up with celebrity fashion here. 1 /6 Deepika Padukone in Sabyasachi and Amrapali at 'Padmavati' promotions in Mumbai Image: Instagram.com/shaleenanathani Sonakshi Sinha in Anamika Khanna, Anomaly by Anam and Jimmy Choo at 'Ittefaq' promotions

Priyanka Chopra: “Everything I am is because of where I grew up. I’m very desi”

Wednesday, November 1 2017

Priyanka Chopra: “Everything I am is because of where I grew up. I’m very desi”

Priyanka Chopra’s popularity has reached critical mass. That became obvious to me earlier this year when walking through Union Square in New York City, and an unsavoury gentleman eager to be friends called out to me, “Hey, Priyanka Chopra!” When I narrate this incident to Chopra, she laughs, a big solar plexus laugh, and says, “I’ve really reached the heartland of America now that I’m a catcall.” She means it as a joke, but it’s also the truth. In a short period of time, Chopra has burrowed deep into the pop consciousness of America. One day she’s spreading desi cheer by playing Holi with Jimmy Fallon or beating him at a hot wing eating contest on The Tonight Show , on another she’s tinkling her aarti bell for Vogue ’s 73 Questions video series or handing out trophies at the Academy Awards. Her role in the film adaptation of Baywatch really drove all that home. The TV show was shorthand for California culture in the 1990s, and though the 2017 film might have been a box-office washout, it can’t be argued that it catapulted PC from a Bollywood actor dabbling in Hollywood into a truly global phenomenon. Chopra, however, loses no chance to remind everyone where she came from. “Everything I am is because of where I grew up. I’m very desi. My achaar goes with me even over my shoes,” she says. (The achaar in question is “mirchi— green or red” for condiment connoisseurs to know.) Pudin Hara is another home-grown essential that travels around with her. For all that national pride, she’s not come this far to make simplistic, jingoistic declarations of Indian-ness. Her self-assigned mission in the West is to ensure that talent—no matter where in the world it comes from and what colour it is—is recognised for its true potential. “It’s not about showing the world what India or Indian culture is. My ambition and struggle is showing that talent from India or wherever else, who excel at their jobs, can stand shoulder-to-shoulder with anyone. It shouldn’t be a novelty, it should be the norm.” That gets to the crux of why Chopra is adored by brown girls everywhere. We recognise her ambition and tenacity, and respect how far she’s gotten in a world where we hear the word ‘no’ more than ‘yes’. Even for someone like her, with her seemingly infinite resources, it couldn’t have been easy chipping a foothold in a closed industry like Hollywood. Her Bollywood cred could only have gotten her so far, and the rest of that climb must have been a steep one. Her struggle is our struggle and a win for her is a win for us. American Hustle We are at a time when Hollywood studios are earning much of their revenue internationally. It seems a fairly natural progression that onscreen talent would mirror the diversity of audiences. A recent study by the Creative Artists Agency finds that films that have more diverse casts score better at the box office than those with less diverse ones. Yet, last year researchers at the University of Southern California, after studying over 400 films and TV shows, found that Hollywood has a major diversity problem, with only a third of speaking characters being female, while a scant 28.3 per cent of speaking parts are non-white people. It’s no wonder that “breaking concrete” is how Chopra describes her early efforts in America. She declines to dwell on it further, only saying that “to have people believe that I could shoulder a show as an American girl, or play a villain, was [about] changing mindsets. I’m not afraid of the world, I’m not afraid of working hard and I don’t think people should be either. You have to fight for what you want and you cannot settle. And that takes effort and work and that’s how I have defined myself and my career.” “Priyanka’s rise internationally is a combination of strategy and talent,” says Naman Ramachandran, the Asia correspondent for Variety , and South Asian cinema critic for Sight & Sound . She eased her way into American entertainment with two visible singles featuring huge names like will.i.am and Pitbull, and unhesitatingly stepped out of her Indian comfort zone to move to LA. Ramachandran also singles out the contribution of entrepreneur Anjula Acharia-Bath who spearheaded many of Chopra’s early efforts in America. “However, strategy only goes so far without talent and Priyanka is a remarkably talented entertainer who has proved that she can straddle both East and West,” says Ramachandran. On The Horizon True to form, Chopra’s been hustling quite seriously and it shows in her upcoming filmography. She resumed filming season 3 of Quantico in September but managed to squeeze in supporting parts in two heavily anticipated films before that. A Kid Like Jake , starring Claire Danes, Jim Parsons and Octavia Spencer, will release next year, while Isn’t It Romantic , whose cast includes Rebel Wilson, Adam DeVine and Liam Hemsworth, is set for a 2019 Valentine’s Day opening. “I had a few months before I started Quantico and I don’t like to sit idle,” she says. Idling doesn’t seem to be in her foreseeable future—she’s stockpiling an arsenal of projects we can hardly wait for. They are also ones she can’t talk about freely just yet. She’s currently developing a comedy series with ABC on Madhuri Dixit’s life following her marriage and move to the US. “The idea of a ginormous Bollywood actress who leaves everything for love and becomes a soccer mom in middle America will be a really funny scenario for a sitcom,” is all she’ll reveal. Another buzzed-about project is a biopic of Kalpana Chawla, with Chopra playing the role of the late American astronaut. After Quantico , Chopra says her creative horizon has expanded in several ways. “I’ve realised media and entertainment is such a vast field that I can expand my creative self in every direction. As I go along, I’m dabbling in various businesses, in films and TV and production. That’s a cool place to be.” Her production company Purple Pebble Pictures, set up to shine a spotlight on new talent and regional Indian cinema, will release the Sikkimese film Pahuna early next year. As she charts her course for the next few years, her only agenda is “to keep climbing. I like to do things for the first time. I don’t know where that will take me; my road has always been a little less travelled.” Metaphorically, of course, because her real-life travel itinerary seems schizophrenic. She’s getting on a plane to India as we speak, and in a span of a month and a half will have touched down in Toronto, Jordan and LA before going back to New York. “I have wings and no roots at the moment,” she admits in a wistful moment. We get the feeling that even with roots grounding her, her star will keep rising. Set designer: Michael Sturgeon/ ADB Agency Hair: Bok-Hee using Pantene/Streeters Make-up: Nick Barose using NARS Cosmetics/ Exclusive Artists Management Manicure: Ami Vega using Chanel le Vernis/ See Management Production: Coco Knudson/Seliger Studio; Divya Jagwani Photographer’s assistants: John Kelsey; Daniel Brittain Photo intern: Xu Yang Assistant stylist: Fabio Immediato Fashion intern: Nikita Dodani Accommodation partner: The Pierre, New York & Andaz 5th Avenue Photographed by Mark Seliger; Styled by Anaita Shroff Adajania In this story: Priyanka Chopra Now Playing: Walk the Cannes 2017 red carpet with Deepika Padukone

Sabyasachi's capsule collection for Lane Crawford is a stunner

Thursday, November 2 2017

Sabyasachi's capsule collection for Lane Crawford is a stunner

Sabyasachi's capsule collection for Lane Crawford is a stunner Time to max out that credit card By Elle Team November 2, 2017 SHARE After multiple successful collaborations with labels like Christian Louboutin and Forevermark, designer Sabyasachi Mukherjee has once again announced his latest capsule collection, this time for luxury departmental store Lane Crawford in Hong Kong. Designed keeping the global audience in mind, the handcrafted range features delicate embroidered tulle tops, jacquard silk bodycon dresses, embellished tulle overlay velvet skirts, sequinned silk pants, georgette jumpsuits and embellished bomber jackets. Sabyasachi exclusively for Lane Crawford. Rendered in soft sheer tulle with floral velvet appliques strategically hand-embroidered and held together by beaded fringes along the hem to give floral fantasies a graphic uplift. Shoe Courtesy: Christian Louboutin View & shop the collection at: http://www.lanecrawford.com/brand/57303754/sabyasachi/women/ #Sabyasachi #TheWorldOfSabyasachi @louboutinworld @cl.india #Louboutin #SabyasachixLaneCrawford #LaneCrawford #HongKong @lanecrawford #SabyasachiJewelry A post shared by Sabyasachi Mukherjee (@sabyasachiofficial) on Nov 1, 2017 at 5:22pm PDT When asked about the inspiration behind his collection, Sabyasachi said , “I imagined glorious travellers, flying in private jets from all over the world to China Club in cross cultural handmade clothing. I imagined women in Indian textiles, oriental reds, chinoiserie prints and sparkle, sitting upright on bright canvas clad chairs playing bridge and Mahjong with feral intimidation.” Sabyasachi exclusively for Lane Crawford View & shop the collection at: http://www.lanecrawford.com/brand/57303754/sabyasachi/women/ Video Courtesy: Sabyasachi #Sabyasachi #TheWorldofSabyasachi #SabyasachixLaneCrawford #LaneCrawford #HongKong @lanecrawford #SabyasachiJewelry A post shared by Sabyasachi Mukherjee (@sabyasachiofficial) on Nov 1, 2017 at 5:28pm PDT The colour palette sees a classic mix of black and red with gold moving into lighter pastel shades of sage green, beige, blush peach and powder blue. Floral motifs — whether intricately hand embroidered or printed — are liberally used throughout the collection, lending a carefree summery vibe. Each ensemble has been handcrafted by artisans in India The capsule collection received an overwhelming response with the first batch being sold within two days of it going live. The second batch is now up for grabs at the Hong Kong store and on the website. #ELLELoves: 5 looks from Sabyasachi's capsule collection for Lane Crawford: Sabyasachi, embellished velvet cropped bomber jacket, Rs 163,760 Sabyasachi, tropical floral embellished tulle sleeveless top, Rs 109,496 Sabyasachi, floral embellished silk swing dress, Rs 95,284 Sabyasachi, floral embellished tulle overlay velvet skirt, Rs 109,496 Sabyasachi, floral print velvet trim sequin silk pants, Rs 109,496

Celebrity trend to try: Shoulder-duster chaandbalis

Thursday, November 2 2017

Celebrity trend to try: Shoulder-duster chaandbalis

Celebrity trend to try: Shoulder-duster chaandbalis The longer, the better By Shweta Gandhi November 2, 2017 SHARE With the wedding season just round the corner, your probably neck-deep in picking out your outfits and accessories. As seen on the runway, black is a colour to experiment with this season , and as for jewellery, maximalism is trending. Shoulder dusters were unanimously voted by designers like Ritu Kumar and Sonal Varma as the one accessory fad to invest in. And now, Bollywood A-listers like Deepika Padukone and Sonam Kapoor have taken that trend forward and added some traditional appeal to it — say hello to shoulder-duster chaandbalis. A post shared by Sabyasachi Mukherjee (@sabyasachiofficial) on Oct 31, 2017 at 4:05am PDT Deepika's clean and minimal look is balanced out with the statement earrings which have all our attention. @abujanisandeepkhosla @abujani1 @sandeepkhosla @artinayar A post shared by sonamkapoor (@sonamkapoor) on Sep 8, 2017 at 5:26am PDT Sonam pairs her shoulder-grazing chaandbalis with a beige embellished anarkali suit, subtle make-up and her hair styled in loose waves. A post shared by Sridevi Kapoor (@sridevi.kapoor) on Oct 22, 2017 at 1:26am PDT Sridevi works her chaandbalis with a gold embellished Sabyasachi sari. Preity Zinta's opulent pick matches well with designer Sanjukta Dutta's gold-motifed sari adorned with a temple border. Looking to buy shoulder duster chaandbalis? This curated list will sort you out. 8 exquisite shoulder-grazing chaandbalis to buy: Jaipur Jewels, price on request Kishandas & Co, price on request Zoya, price on request Tribe By Amrapali, Rs 26,500 Jaypore, Rs 19,600 Anmol Jewellers, price on request Anita Dongre, Rs 16,600 Tanishq, Rs 4,99,079 These jadau earrings are embellished with polkis and rubies with pearl and emerald danglers in 22k gold. At: G1, Swapnalok, 47, Napean Sea road, Mumbai or 29, Sunder Nagar market, 1st floor, New Delhi. These chaandbalis are decorated with almas (uncut diamonds) and pearls. At: 6-3-1111/3, Nishad Baug layout, Begumpet , Hyderabad. These chaandbalis take inspiration from the magnificent peacock and capture the pride of Rajasthan. At: M-72, Greater Kailash 1 Rd, Main Market, M Block, Greater Kailash I, New Delhi. These gold-plated silver chaandbalis are decorated with floral motifs, white crystals and pearls. Buy them here . A handcrafted pair of green onyx kundan-inspired earrings beautified with pearls. Get them here . These chaandbalis are set with rubies, pearls, uncut diamonds and rose cut diamonds, crafted in 18k gold. At: Turner Road, Bandra (W), Mumbai. These gold-plated silver chaandbalis are adorned with floral and geometric motifs, set with crystals and pearl drops detailing. Buy them here . These 22k gold earrings are inspired by the movie Padmavati . Buy them here . Jaipur Jewels, price on request These jadau earrings are embellished with polkis and rubies with pearl and emerald danglers in 22k gold. At: G1, Swapnalok, 47, Napean Sea road, Mumbai or 29, Sunder Nagar market, 1st floor, New Delhi. Kishandas & Co, price on request These chaandbalis are decorated with almas (uncut diamonds) and pearls. At: 6-3-1111/3, Nishad Baug layout, Begumpet , Hyderabad. Zoya, price on request These chaandbalis take inspiration from the magnificent peacock and capture the pride of Rajasthan. At: M-72, Greater Kailash 1 Rd, Main Market, M Block, Greater Kailash I, New Delhi. Tribe By Amrapali, Rs 26,500 These gold-plated silver chaandbalis are decorated with floral motifs, white crystals and pearls. Buy them here . Jaypore, Rs 19,600 A handcrafted pair of green onyx kundan-inspired earrings beautified with pearls. Get them here . Anmol Jewellers, price on request These chaandbalis are set with rubies, pearls, uncut diamonds and rose cut diamonds, crafted in 18k gold. At: Turner Road, Bandra (W), Mumbai. Anita Dongre, Rs 16,600 These gold-plated silver chaandbalis are adorned with floral and geometric motifs, set with crystals and pearl drops detailing. Buy them here . Tanishq, Rs 4,99,079 These 22k gold earrings are inspired by the movie Padmavati . Buy them here .