Daily Fashion News

Patagonia to sue President Trump to protect public lands

Tuesday, December 5 2017

Patagonia to sue President Trump to protect public lands

London - Anyone paying a visit to Patagonia's website will be greeted with a chilling message: 'The President Stole Your Land.' The lifestyle brand has threaten to take legal action against President Donald Trump and his adminstration after plans to drastically reduce the size of two national monuments in the United States were announced. Patagonia, together with other groups fighting to protect public lands in the United States, plans to sue President Trump over the "illegal move." On Monday, Trump's administration announced that the Bears Ears National Monument in Utah will be decreased by 85 percent, in addition to reducing The Grand Staircase National Monument in Nevada by 50 percent. "This is the largest elimination of protected land in American history," said Patagonia in a statement. Both the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante sit on millions of arces of land. Patagonia to take a stand against President Trump to protect public lands The US President stated that the Antiquities Act does not give the federal government unlimited power to hold millions of acres of land and water, and that it is time to end "this abusive practice" by giving the land back to the people. In addition to vastly cutting down the size of the national monument, Trump's administration also aims to introduce new land management policies which would lead the way for commercial fishing and grazing to take place on federal lands. Following the announcement a number of environmental campaigners and brands came together to stand against Trump Administration's decision. "Americans have overwhelmingly spoken out against the Trump administration’s unprecedented attempt to shut down our national monuments," said Patagonia president and chief executive officer Rose Marcario in a statement. "The administration’s unlawful actions betray our shared responsibility to protect iconic places for future generations and represents the largest elimination of protected land in American history. We’ve fought to protect these places since we were founded and now we’ll continue that fight in the courts." Patagonia has fought to protect public lands for close to 30 years, and is "proud" to have played a role in the establishment of several national monuments, including Bears Ears National Monument in Utah and Basin and Range and Gold Butte National Monuments in Nevada. The US outdoor company argued that downsizing any national monument "could have a devastating impact on local economies and the multi billion-dollar outdoor recreation economy that America’s public lands and waterways support," while underlining the fact that outdoor recreation is among America's largest industries, contributing 887 billion US dollars in annual spend with a collective workforce of 7.6 million jobs - "far outpacing the jobs and spending generated by the oil and gas industry." The US outdoor brand, together with The North Face and other outdoor labels, previously stood against an executive order from President Trump in April. At the time Trump signed an order which led to the Interior Department’s review of lands receiving designations from 1996 and onwards, which totalled more than 100,000 arces on the basis of a number of factor, including the lands were granted federal resources to maintain them and how the act defines such designations. Photo: Patagonia, website

Sustainable Textile Innovations: EcoVero, an alternative to viscose

Tuesday, December 5 2017

Sustainable Textile Innovations: EcoVero, an alternative to viscose

London - As the fashion industry heads towards a future where textile resources are scarce, natural fibers such as cotton, which remains a resource-intensive material, and petroleum-based fibers like acrylic, polyester, nylon, and spandex remain high in demand. But as the production of these fibers continues to cause irreversible damage to our environment, more and more companies are seeking out an alternative, sustainable fibers, and fabrics. In this series, FashionUnited explores the future possibilities offered by sustainable innovations in the textile and fashion industry. In this installment, FashionUnited examines the new, more responsible option to viscose - EcoVero. Viscose, which is also known as rayon, has been used to make soft, silky fabrics, luxurious feeling fabrics. Made from purified cellulose, it is produced from specially processed wood pulp and is often compared to silk and cotton. However although the fabric made from this fiber may be beautiful, viscose remains a semi-synthetic, chemical fiber. Often the timber used to for the wooden pulp stems from irrigation-intensive monocultures, which negatively impact the earth. Large amounts of highly toxic chemicals, such as carbon disulfide are used during the production of viscose, which has led to a number of worker poisonings. In addition, shipping the cellulose-based fiber around the globe also increases the level of Co2 emissions, making it a harmful fiber. EcoVero - the new and improved sustainable alternative to conventional viscose “This is about as dirty as it gets”, said Christian Brandt COO of eco-friendly fashion brand Armedangels. “We can’t possibly justify using fabrics like [viscose].” However, rather than give up their search for a more sustainable alternative to the fiber, the label continued its search until it stumbled across the most responsible viscose fiber available - EcoVero. Produced by Lenzing, leading cellulose fibre producer, near the Attersee Lake in Austria, EcoVero is made using sustainable wood from controlled sources which are either FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) or PEFC (Program for Endorsement of Forest Certification Schemes) certified in Europe, instead of bamboo or eucalyptus which is commonly used in normal viscose production. More than 60 percent of the trees used to produced EcoVero fibers come from Austria and Bavaria to ensure lower emissions. The cellulose fiber is produced on-site at a state of the art facility via a new, innovative environmental process which has significantly lower emissions and water impact than conventional viscose. Nearly all the chemicals used during the production of EcoVero are recovered and reused. Compared to conventional viscose production, the production of EcoVero causes 50 percent less emissions and takes up half as much energy and water in addition to its pulp bleaching being 100 percent chlorine-free. What’s more, Lenzing also offers full supply chain transparency which makes EcoVero fibers identifiable in the final product through its innovative identification technology. “We are supporting the trend in the fashion industry towards greater transparency,” said Robert van de Kerkhof, Chief Commercial Officer at Lenzing. “It is becoming increasingly important to know where the products come from and which path they have covered.” Armedangels is the first and only organic, sustainable fashion brand to incorporate EcoVero into its collections for winter 2017, and visited Lenzing production facility in Austria to see first hand how the eco-fiber is made. “EcoVero really elevates viscose to a whole new level,” said Brandt, after inspecting the EcoVero fabrics. “We are especially happy about the fact that these fibers do not come from monocultures - as it is the case with bamboo or eucalyptus - but from sustainable forestry. The transport is not as much of an issue either, as it doesn’t need to be shipped around the globe since they use timber from Europe that is processed into fiber right on site at Lenzing in Austria. This is the best argument for us.” Although some argue that EcoVero remains a viscose product, whose production still requires the use of potentially hazardous chemicals even using newer, more sustainable production processes, the new fiber is still a welcome alternative to conventional viscose. Over the years Lenzing has invested several million euros into improving its viscose production to ensure it is environmentally friendly as possible. In addition, the production location is key for many fashion brands keen to source the fiber, as the laws and regulations concerning production are stricter and monitored more tightly than in other developing countries which have become sourcing hubs for the industry. “Our goal is to raise awareness among as many customers as possible for the consequences of what they decide to buy,” added Van De Kerkhof during Armedangels visit, a goal the brand is keen to help achieve. Both companies hope to make a difference when it comes to the fashion industry shift to a more sustainable model, and Armedangels is keen to continue working with Lenzing, even if other competitors are also using EcoVero. “There is no other manufacturer for viscose who is this open,” pointed out Brandt. “Passion and mutual trust are more important to us than just drafting long-term goals.” Read more:

Protected: Indian street art has never looked this good

Monday, December 4 2017

Protected: Indian street art has never looked this good

You have read of 10 stories this month 30 day free access to digital issues worth INR 400 Get it now ! This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: Password:

How I lost 21kg before my wedding: the weight loss tips that actually worked

Monday, December 4 2017

How I lost 21kg before my wedding: the weight loss tips that actually worked

You have read of 10 stories this month 30 day free access to digital issues worth INR 400 Get it now ! Image: Priyanka Kapadia I tie the knot this month and started my weight loss journey about two years ago, before my wedding was even in the picture. Honestly, if you’re getting on a diet or starting a workout routine six months before your wedding, don’t be too hard on yourself—you will collapse or be mentally drained. When I was turning 30, I realised that this was my turning point—I weighed the most I had ever weighed and decided to stop making excuses and take matters in my own hands. Planning a wedding is a manic task to say the least—Indian weddings in particular are planned at a grand scale and the sheer volume of things to do drives most brides and grooms crazy. But of course, we all want to look our best on our wedding day—and this has nothing to do with being thin, but rather fit. Even if we might not have excess kilograms on the scale, we could all use some toning up, courtesy a regular workout routine. Plus, trust me, it’s the best way to blow off steam when your fiancé won’t agree on a 100th wedding detail with you. Here are the best weight loss tips I’ve discovered over time, that you should try, especially if you’re a bride to be. Get yourself a workout buddy My fitness journey began with my then-lawyer friend, Sohrab Khushrushahi ( you’ll remember him from when I spoke to the now-fitness-expert about staying fit during the festive season ). He’s a really close friend who is super disciplined and only cheats once in 12 weeks. We live in the same building so I used to see his eating habits. He wouldn’t touch the chips, while I, at midnight, would be eating banana chips and chocolate cake. It’s not like I had a sugar craving, but I ate it because it was there. You need to be emotionally and physically involved to lose weight When I first started working out, nobody believed I would go through with it—I’m known to take on something new for two-three months and then drop it. Because Sohrab was a full-time lawyer, he only had time at 7:30am in the morning to work out. Suddenly in three months, he changed my whole lifestyle—I was now waking up at 7am. In a way, because he was a friend, I didn’t want to disappoint him. I felt like if I cheated I was betraying him, which kind of helped me stick to it. He wouldn’t shout at me for coming in late, but would make me do extra burpees instead. According to me, it takes at least three months to make a change and six months for you to start seeing the results of your weight loss journey. You need to stop social drinking and eating junk—I completely changed the way I ate. I come from a Gujarati house where there’s around snacks all the time. The first three months were tough, but when you see your body changing, it motivates you to move on. Make smarter choices for weight loss If your life is anything like mine—think shoots late and early in the am, sourcing across the city and a generally unpredictable lifestyle—you’ll know that following a specific diet plan under a nutritionist, to lose weight, can be tough to keep up with. When I started, I wasn’t even close to getting engaged or planning a wedding. I’ve always been quite athletic and loved working out but I had the worst eating habits. Sohrab itself monitored my diet. It was really simple—all he told me was to stop eating out of a packet and opt for whole, cooked food. I also stopped refined sugar, wheat and rice. I then started substituting my food. I swapped rice with quinoa and wheat with jowar or bajra flour for starters. Now, I can go to a restaurant and I know what to pick off the menu. It’s something you learn yourself. Once a month, I’ll crave that bowl of rice and prawn curry but I’ll have two bites and be full. It satisfies me and I’m okay with that. If I’m going to brunch, I’ll have a pancake and work it off over the upcoming days. Push yourself when it’s time “Start off easy and gradually increase the intensity of your workouts so you don’t feel like you dived head on into something challenging and can’t keep up. Let your wedding motivate you, as opposed to stress you out in more ways than it probably already is. I got engaged a year back and had lost about 15 kilos; I was the fittest I’d ever been then, but now there was another motivation. I was getting married in a year and I told my fiancé that we have to be in the best shape for our wedding . The past six months I’m the lightest I’ve ever been. Even though Sohrab isn’t a fan of the scale, I’ve been doing fittings for the last six months and my measurements are changing every three weeks. I’m not doing any special sort of workout because I’m getting married, but it’s now a part of my lifestyle. My workouts have intensified over time and I’m way more mindful of what I eat, I don’t need Sohrab to tell me if a certain food is good or bad for me. Now that I’m a week away from my wedding, I hope to do more strength training so I look my toned best on the day of.” – As told to Anjan Sachar

Are you committed to women’s empowerment? Block your weekend for this fest

Monday, December 4 2017

Are you committed to women’s empowerment? Block your weekend for this fest

If we are invested in changing the future for women in the country, every step taken in that direction is an important one. Award-winning journalist Barkha Dutt is curating a special festival called ‘We The Women’ in Mumbai this weekend, presented by Facebook and UN Women, to open a dialogue about women’s empowerment. The 48-hour-long fest aims to bring together men and women along with an influential audience, with the aim to enable women to ‘open doors’ for themselves and other women. The panel of speakers will include names like Smriti Irani, Harsimrat Badal, Mithali Raj, Sakshi Malik, Roshni Nadar Malhotra, Pallavi Shroff, Ginni Mahi, Twinkle Khanna, Ankhi Das, Poonam Muttreja and others to engage the audience in conversations about concerns, challenges and achievements by women. Take some time off and contribute to the cause of empowering women, because your opinion matters. The two-day long event will also feature a flea market, special performances by the likes of Farhan Akhtar, hip hop artist Ginni Mahi and Maati Baani, and art curated by Parmesh Shahani of Godrej Culture Labs. Although the event is not ticketed, those interested are requested to register themselves for the fest here . ‘We The Women’ will take place on December 9 and 10 at Mehboob Studios, Bandra, Mumbai

#BeautyGoals: How to get Kareena Kapoor Khan’s nude makeup look

Monday, December 4 2017

#BeautyGoals: How to get Kareena Kapoor Khan’s nude makeup look

In this week’s best Bollywood beauty Instagram roundup, Kareena Kapoor Khan’s nude makeup look was the definite winner—and it’s perfect for the December party season. How can you get it? Start with clean skin, a light base, follow with a swipe of neutral brown eyeshadow, a nude lip and multiple coats of mascara. It’s a look that almost nobody can fault. Shades of pinks and reds seemed to be having a moment. Jacqueline Fernandez wore Barbie pink on her eyes, cheeks and lips for a monotone makeup look, as did Athiya Shetty. Diana Penty took the intense route and wore a purple and pink-coloured smoky eye. When it comes to bright, in-your-face pinks, Alia Bhatt and Sonakshi Sinha know how to do it justice. While Bhatt chose a light rosy hue in a wash on her eyes and lips accompanied by soft, open waves, Sinha opted for a bright, fuchsia hue on as eyeshadow and for a creamy pout. Katrina Kaif and Vaani Kapoor were twinning when it came to makeup—mega lashes and glossy pouts were their look of choice. For eye makeup, Bollywood celebrities went two ways—dark, kohl-focused looks, and clean, mascara-only ones. Amongst those who preferred kohl was Ileana D’Cruz, while those who picked a clean slate were Deepika Padukone, Disha Patani and Pooja Hegde. Sonam Kapoor made matching makeup work for her with gold eyeshadow, a winged eye and nude lips that she paired with her gilded outfit and headband. Kriti Sanon was amongst the few this week who wore a red lip and let her hair half down with a mid-level knot to keep the hair off her face.

5 reasons you can’t miss Vogue India’s December 2017 issue

Tuesday, December 5 2017

5 reasons you can’t miss Vogue India’s December 2017 issue

With all the exciting holiday parties, wedding festivities and end-of-the-year extravaganzas, December truly is the Friday night of months. Whether you’re planning on partying up a storm, escaping to an exotic location or staying in for Netflix dates, here are five reasons to look forward to Vogue India’s December issue as 2017 draws to a close. 1 /5 Salman Khan and Katrina Kaif make their Vogue debut Back in on the big screen together after a gap of five years, and for the first time on our cover, Salman Khan and Katrina Kaif to dish details about their camaraderie, mysterious first meeting and undeniable on-screen chemistry. Once a regular designer on every party girl’s list, Surily DP Goel re-emerges from her hiatus and gets candid about her comeback. In the spirit of the new year, she talks about the biggest inspirations for her collection, destination weddings and her closest friends. Image: Abheet Gidwani Make the most of the Middle East If you’re looking to plan a grand getaway, look no further than the Middle East. From thrilling adventures to extensive shopping guides to beauty breakdowns, Vogue’s December issue comes packed with all the information you need to enjoy this destination. This month’s Vogue seeks the expert guidance of five chefs who whip up decadent delights to replace the humdrum butter popcorn and give your binge sessions a whole new meaning. If you want to dazzle your way through Christmas dinners or New Year balls, Vogue ’s complete guide to getting your glitter game on has you covered, whether you want to sport sapphire smoky eye or sparkly statement lips.

Heritage Global auctions Wellington Rain Boot Company

Wednesday, December 6 2017

Heritage Global auctions Wellington Rain Boot Company

Heritage Global Patents and Trademarks (HGPT), global brokerage and advisory service, just announced that it will manage an auction for British Wellington Rain Boot Company. The sale will include all assets of the company including its trademarks and intellectual property. The sale will also include all product formulations, manufacturing contracts, retail distribution and more according to a statement released by the company. The brand, which has been renown for its rain boots, has merged fashion along with utilitarian use. By capitalizing on the rain boot market, the company holds value for its status as a footwear company. Interested buyers can find out more information on the company's assets through a non-disclosure agreement (NDA) available on the Heritage Global website. As the company is now accepting offers for the Wellington Rain Boot company, it seems the footwear brand will be acquired soon.

Shop alert: 3 new stores dedicated to eco-friendly fashion

Tuesday, December 5 2017

Shop alert: 3 new stores dedicated to eco-friendly fashion

Sustainability encompasses three crucial areas — economic, social and environmental — that play a major role for designers who are creating eco-friendly collections. From sourcing natural fabrics to manufacturing them, every step taken must ensure minimal impact on the three sectors that, in turn, leads to a lower carbon footprint. Designers like Anita Dongre, Doodlage, Purvi Doshi and Ka Sha are some of the names that are focussing their energies on creating a system that supports eco fashion through their handwoven and handmade designs, use of organic fabrics, upcycling or recycling techniques and fair trade practices. "Sustainability with sensibility is the motto. It is the need of the hour, not only for India but all across the world. Our eco-friendly collections try to eliminate the hazards caused by the fashion industry like the overuse of chemicals, animal cruelty, an absence of fair trade, imported fabrics/yarns that bring our economy down. Our aim is to make consumers self-conscious about what they're wearing and how it directly affects the world around them," says designer Purvi Doshi. Now, these sustainably-produced collections are even easier to avail of, thanks to three new stores that have opened in Mumbai and Delhi that exclusively focus on ethical fashion. Looking to buy eco-friendly fashion? This is where you need to head: 1. Anita Dongre Grassroot in Delhi Anita Dongre Grassroot is known for its handwoven and handmade creations that use no fur, leather or animal skin products. Her Autumn/Winter '17 collection comprises of fabrics like handspun cotton, handwoven chanderi and a newly-introduced stretch textile that has been created using a handloom. Grassroot's brand philosophy is to revive and sustain old crafts while empowering women artisans in rural villages. Each ensemble is handcrafted and takes hours, sometimes even days to produce. This is Grassroot's first stand-alone store in the capital. Take a look below: Anita Dongre Grassroot

Chumbak raises fresh funds to expand retail, increase product portfolio

Wednesday, December 6 2017

Chumbak raises fresh funds to expand retail, increase product portfolio

Bengaluru-based lifestyle brand Chumbak has raised $13.1 million (nearly Rs 85 crore) in a funding round led by Mumbai-based private equity firm, Gaja Capital. The round also saw participation from existing investors Matrix Partners and Seedfund. The company sells designer T-shirts, tins, coffee mugs, shot glasses, mouse pads, bookmarks, posters, among others. Chumbak will be using fresh funds to expand its geographical footprint and its product portfolio. With this deal, Gaja Capital is expected to pick up a 28.36 per cent minority stake in return for its investment, while Matrix Partners will increase its stake to 28.62 per cent. A back-of-the-envelope calculation reveals the current funding round would put the company’s valuation roughly at around Rs 183.35 crore. This indicates that its enterprise value has not really gone up significantly since its last funding round, where Chumbak was valued at around Rs 118 crore post-money. Chumbak started by making souvenirs in 2009 the company has diversified across 100 categories, including fashion and travel accessories, bags and wallets, and decor. In 2015, it forayed into the apparel category. It sells its merchandise at 18 exclusive stores across 11 cities in India, including Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore, Hyderabad, Chennai, Kochi, and Jaipur. The company planned to double the number of offline stores to 30 by the end of 2017. Besides, it also has pop-up stores in prominent malls across the country.

The Limited relaunches online and introduces plus size

Wednesday, December 6 2017

The Limited relaunches online and introduces plus size

Womenswear brand The Limited just relaunched with new genres and categories for modern apparel. The launch, announced Tuesday on December 5, also signifies the brand's return to TheLimited.com as well. With the launch, Belk Inc. also will become the exclusive distributor for The Limited brand with this new launch. The womenswear brand launched in 150 Belk Stores and will continue to open in 74 more stores in 2018. With this partnership, The Limited will also be managed as an exclusive, private brand. "The Limited provides customers with tailored, feminine looks to seamlessly carry the modern woman from work to her social life," Nadine Rauer, Belk Executive Vice President and General Merchandise Manager said in a press release. "We're committed to not only delivering the products that The Limited is known for, but also expanding the assortment to take this iconic brand to the next level." The Limited stages a comeback with Belk Inc. as the main distributor The apparel line includes new categories such as plus size, petite, tall and denim for an inclusive stance on all body types. The plus size category is the first time The Limited has offered this range. The relaunch will also include various look for the workforce designed with women in mind that remain reasonless. Founded in 1963, the brand started off as a stylish, timeless women's brand. The company grew to have over 250 stores in 42 states in the past. With the new rebrand, it seems The Limited is working towards a comeback. Source: The Limited / Belk, Inc.

China targets booming online lending as crisis fears build

Wednesday, December 6 2017

China targets booming online lending as crisis fears build

When Jia Xinru needed to borrow money to buy new clothes, order food and buy a projector to screen Breaking Bad on her wall, she had instant access to China's growing number of lenders via her mobile phone. The 24-year-old secretary is among millions of Chinese who have turned to proliferating online companies that dish out quick loans -- and are worrying the country's leadership. On Friday authorities issued new rules on microlending, designed to protect consumers and limit risk for creditors. The move was the latest aimed at tackling financial risks as the world's number two economy faces ballooning debt that has drawn warnings of a potential global financial crisis. While most economists and analysts have focused their concerns on corporate debt, household debt has risen rapidly, roughly doubling since 2012, according to the Bank for International Settlements, known as the central banks' central bank. And smartphones have made it even easier for consumers to borrow cash in China, with e-commerce apps and mobile payment increasingly prevalent. Jia started accumulating her debt when she was in college, turning to tech titan Alibaba when she could not get a credit card. The ease of a few taps on her phone and a four minute wait led Jia to borrow and borrow and when she was finally able to take out a card, she used it to repay Alibaba's affiliate Ant Financial. But her debt reached roughly 9,000 USD this summer, and her monthly interest payments eclipsed her meagre salary. She described the debts as "snowballing", finding it harder to pay one debt as she borrowed to pay another. 'Lending nirvana' Alternative lending, with loans that can be wired to accounts within minutes, has taken off in China and accounts for 85 percent of the global market, according to a University of Cambridge report. By 2020, some estimates forecast the business could approach that of credit cards, suggesting some Chinese may be leapfrogging from plastic to mobile loans. Online lenders say most of their business comes from consumers and small businesses with little access to the formal banking system -- only a third of Chinese have credit cards, according to the central bank. "Most of our borrowers are in third or fourth tier cities," said a marketing employee at lending platform Guangxindai, who declined to give her name. "They have a hard time getting credit cards from banks." The business's growth comes as a new generation of Chinese shed their parents penchant for saving and embrace the credit culture. "There's a shift in China where people are now far more willing to take on debt," said Jason Bedford, executive director of Asian Financials Research at UBS Investment Bank. "There's been a tremendous push into consumer lending. It's seen as the next lending nirvana." The lending market exploded as regulators permitted the spread of platforms and products, with tech giants Alibaba, Tencent and Baidu all offering loans on demand through mobile apps. The space also attracted a number of upstarts. Online platforms Qudian, PPDAI Group and China Rapid Finance have listed publicly in the US this year and a number of similar firms are waiting on the sidelines. PPDAI's platform has attracted nine million borrowers, and the volume of issued loans has increased five-fold since 2015. 'Start over' But with an eye on predatory lending and its after-effects, the latest rules prohibit lending to consumers without income and cap interest rates at 36 percent annually. Regulators will also stop the approval of new online micro lenders. The move sent the stock prices of Qudian, PPDAI Group and China Rapid Finance tumbling in the past week. And Anne Stevenson-Yang, research director at J Capital Research, said the regulations could lead half of all online lenders to fold. Managing risk can be a tricky balancing act for online lending platforms when a large portion of the Chinese population lacks credit scores. Some platforms write off the bad loans while others have taken defaulted borrowers to court. Alibaba has built a credit scoring system called Sesame Credit that tracks users on its platforms and provides perks to those with high credit scores. It also recently limited annualized interest rates to 24 percent. This autumn Jia turned to friends and family to pay off some of her credit card and Alibaba debt, with no interest. "When I pay it all off," she said, "I'm going to move to a new city and start over." (AFP) Photos: Pixabay