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Mukesh Khanna: If we can spend 300 crore on 'Bahubali', can’t we spend 10 crore on a children’s film?

Tuesday, November 14 2017

Mukesh Khanna: If we can spend 300 crore on 'Bahubali', can’t we spend 10 crore on a children’s film?

Mukesh Khanna: If we can spend 300 crore on 'Bahubali', can’t we spend 10 crore on a children’s film? Rachana Dubey While talking to BT, Mukesh Khanna, Chairman, Children’s Film Society of India (CFSI), says that it’s the Central government’s responsibility to improve the state of children’s films in India. | TNN | Nov 14, 2017, 01:00 IST Mukesh Khanna While talking to BT, Mukesh Khanna , Chairman, Children's Film Society of India (CFSI), says that it's the Central government's responsibility to improve the state of children's films in India. It's your third year as CFSI chairman. You had sanctioned about a dozen films, which are yet to see the light of day. What's going on? I have got eight movies off the ground in my tenure so far. You think it's very easy to have films made? No, it's not. Four of these are out-and-out commercial projects because I don't want these films to circulate only in festivals. Earlier, no one tried to get the films made by the society a theatrical release. However, I'm trying to do that and hopefully, these films will release in the next quarter or so. I'm looking for distributors to partner for Tennis Buddies, Banarsi Jasoos, School Chalega and Chidiya Khaana. It has taken me long because I've had to battle with the I&B Ministry to get budgets sanctioned. They don't want to acknowledge that the cost of filmmaking has spiralled in the past 20 years. Why is funding becoming an issue when there are government subsidies? We have subsidies, not budgets. The ministry is yet to understand the system I have set up. In the next year, we should be able to start about 12 films. So, I've got things moving. Also, we have organised a children's film festival in Telangana that ends today. After taking over as the I&B Minister, Smriti Irani has been making changes. Have you met her to discuss the working conditions of the CFSI? I have not met Smriti Irani yet. She is too busy. I am surprised that despite an official letter, she hasn't given me an appointment yet. I have also written to the PMO, requesting for money for kids. I mean, hamare paas bacchon ke liye paisa nahi hai to kiske liye hai? Do you think that the condition of the body has worsened over the years? We can restore its lost glory. Every child needs a film that he can enjoy. They don't need saas bahu and brainless dramas. I ask filmmakers, 'If we can spend `300 crore on Bahubali , can't we spend Rs 10 crore on a children's film?' I am fighting a mentality that needs to change. More producers have to come forth and work — they expect a Harry Potter from Hollywood and not even make a Shaktimaan here. Get latest news & live updates on the go on your pc with News App . Download The Times of India news app for your device. RELATED

(full) MARCUS SMART on his mentality without KYRIE IRVING - YouTube

Monday, November 13 2017

(full) MARCUS SMART on his mentality without KYRIE IRVING - YouTube

The interactive transcript could not be loaded. Loading... Rating is available when the video has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on Nov 12, 2017 In the absence of KYRIE IRVING, MARCUS SMART talks his mentality without the star guard and what AL HORFORD brings to the roster. Powered by DRAFT KINGS, use PROMO CODE: CLNS for FREE match play TODAY! For CLNS Media Podcast Studio, go to https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTNM... Follow CLNS Media on Twitter - @CLNSMediaFollow CLNS Media on Facebook - facebook.com/clnsmediaFollow CLNS Media on INSTA - Instagram.com/clnsmediaDownload the FREE CLNS Media mobile app for iOS & GooglePlay Category

(full) JAYLEN BROWN talks the CELTICS' 12-game win-streak - YouTube

Monday, November 13 2017

(full) JAYLEN BROWN talks the CELTICS' 12-game win-streak - YouTube

The interactive transcript could not be loaded. Loading... Rating is available when the video has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on Nov 12, 2017 JAYLEN BROWN discusses the CELTICS' 12-game win-streak, along with mentioning JAYSON TATUM and AL HORFORD. Powered by DRAFT KINGS, use PROMO CODE: CLNS for FREE match play TODAY! For CLNS Media Podcast Studio, go to https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTNM... Follow CLNS Media on Twitter - @CLNSMediaFollow CLNS Media on Facebook - facebook.com/clnsmediaFollow CLNS Media on INSTA - Instagram.com/clnsmediaDownload the FREE CLNS Media mobile app for iOS & GooglePlay Category

(full) BRAD STEVENS on another CELTICS Win w/out KYRIE - YouTube

Monday, November 13 2017

(full) BRAD STEVENS on another CELTICS Win w/out KYRIE - YouTube

The interactive transcript could not be loaded. Loading... Rating is available when the video has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on Nov 12, 2017 (full) BRAD STEVENS on another CELTICS Win w/out KYRIE Powered by DRAFT KINGS, use PROMO CODE: CLNS for FREE match play TODAY! For CLNS Media Podcast Studio, go to https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTNM... Follow CLNS Media on Twitter - @CLNSMediaFollow CLNS Media on Facebook - facebook.com/clnsmediaFollow CLNS Media on INSTA - Instagram.com/clnsmediaDownload the FREE CLNS Media mobile app for iOS & GooglePlay Category

Raptors Post-Game: DeMar DeRozan - November 12, 2017 - YouTube

Monday, November 13 2017

Raptors Post-Game: DeMar DeRozan - November 12, 2017 - YouTube

The interactive transcript could not be loaded. Loading... Rating is available when the video has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on Nov 12, 2017 DeMar DeRozan addresses the media following Toronto's 95-94 road loss against Boston on Sunday. Category

Raptors Post-Game: Kyle Lowry - November 12, 2017 - YouTube

Monday, November 13 2017

Raptors Post-Game: Kyle Lowry - November 12, 2017 - YouTube

The interactive transcript could not be loaded. Loading... Rating is available when the video has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on Nov 12, 2017 Kyle Lowry addresses the media following Toronto's 95-94 road loss against Boston on Sunday. Category

Raptors Post-Game: Dwane Casey - November 12, 2017 - YouTube

Monday, November 13 2017

Raptors Post-Game: Dwane Casey - November 12, 2017 - YouTube

The interactive transcript could not be loaded. Loading... Rating is available when the video has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on Nov 12, 2017 Head coach Dwane Casey addresses the media following Toronto's 95-94 road loss against Boston on Sunday. Category

Home remedies to help you get rid of skin pigmentation

Monday, November 13 2017

Home remedies to help you get rid of skin pigmentation

These simple yet effective home remedies can reduce pigmentation and help you reverse the effects of skin darkening, too | TNN | Nov 13, 2017, 01:00 IST Uneven colour and dark patches on your skin are a result of skin pigmentation which can happen on any part of the body, including the face, neck, arms or legs. The causes are many — hormonal changes, pregnancy, excessive sun exposure, injury or burn marks, stress, or other health issues. These marks, especially on the face, are a major beauty concern but if treated on time, these simple yet effective home remedies can reduce pigmentation and help you reverse the effects of skin darkening , too. Raw potato Most effective when raw, the potato can take care of a host of skin pigmentation problems. Continuos application can even lighten the skin making a marked difference to the pigmented area. Potatoes are full of starch and natural enzymes which help to exfoliate the skin and remove dead cells. They also have niacin, which belongs to the Vitamin B complex group and is a skin-lightening agent. How to use it For easy application, just slice a small potato into two. To make it moist, add few drops of water on the sliced surface and rub it all over the pigmented area. Take a new slice once the older one goes dry. You can also grate a raw potato, sqeeuze the juice from it and apply it on areas affected by pigmentation. Keep it for half an hour and then rinse with lukewarm water. Do this everyday for a month to see the difference. Lemon Lemon has natural antioxidants in the form of Vitamin C as well as citric acid which reduces pigmentation, and removes dead cells to produce fresh new skin cells and gives you a glowing skin. How to use it Squeeze some fresh lemon juice and use cotton to apply it directly on the affected area. After keeping it on for 15-20 minutes, rinse off with water. Do this twice a day for a few months to see the difference. In case of sensitive skin, it is advisable to dilute the juice with few drops of water. Papaya The enzyme 'papain' in papaya is an excellent exfoliating agent which helps to make new cells for a spotless skin. Papaya also contains antioxidants and phyto nutrients that help you retain your young skin and make it glow further. How to use it Grate the papaya to extract fresh juice from it and apply it on the pigmented area. You can also add aloe vera gel, honey and milk to the papaya mix and use it as a paste. Daily application will give you results in a month. Aloe vera Aloe Vera is a miracle plant when it comes to skin treatments. The gel present in the leaves of the plant can remove dead cells and regenerate new skin cells. How to use it Just apply the gel on the affected area before going to bed and leave it overnight. Rinse off the next morning and you will see positive results in few weeks. If you are using it in the day, add little honey to the gel and apply. Leave for 10-15 minutes and rinse off with lukewarm water. Turmeric With its bleaching properties, turmeric can rid you of pigmented skin and also keep it free of infection due to its anti-inflammatory properties. The presence of curcumin, an antioxidant helps fight off the damage from the sun to the skin. How to use it Make a paste of turmeric powder, almond oil, milk, lemon juice and honey and apply it as a mask on the pigmented area. After 10-15 minutes wash off with lukewarm water. You can do this 2-3 times a week for effective results. B anana This tasty fruit has essential nutrients to keep the skin young, fresh and moisturised. How to use it Mash 1/4th of a ripe, peeled banana and add 1 tbs of fresh milk and 1/2 tsp of honey to make a paste. Apply it on the affected area and let it dry. Wash it off with luke warm water and repeat the procedure daily. Get latest news & live updates on the go on your pc with News App . Download The Times of India news app for your device. RELATED

THAZUAL 10 (FAKNA) 6th November 2017: Tun kar chart-ah One In Christ pakhatna an ni

Monday, November 13 2017

THAZUAL 10 (FAKNA) 6th November 2017: Tun kar chart-ah One In Christ pakhatna an ni

Zonet Website Thar Hi Eng Nge I Ngaihdan? A tha ka ti A tha ka ti lo Sawi tur ka hre lo

Book Review: The Buddha of the Brothel by Kris Advaya

Monday, November 13 2017

Book Review: The Buddha of the Brothel by Kris Advaya

Price: Rs. 299/- When Kris made a trip to India to study Ayurvedic massage, he never thought he would find love, adventure, and heartbreak. Traumatised by the loss of his friend and army abuses, Kris came to India practicing meditation and chastity, but both efforts were turned head over heels when he caught sight of Radha, a sex worker in Pune’s notorious red-light district. Before he knew it, Kris was wrapped up in the world of pimps and crime lords, losing his hold on the life he had been pursuing and all the dreams of stability he had once built in his head. To be with the woman who had stolen his heart away, a life-altering decision awaited. A true story, The Buddha of the Brothel is a poignant look into the world of godmen, spiritual seekers, and the men and women whose lives are ruled by the sex market and its overlords. Advaya’s account, written in refreshingly sparkling prose, is by turns anguished, humorous, hopeful, and bewildered, as he wades through a world he had never expected to encounter. Sure to appeal to readers of Gregory Roberts’s Shantaram with its less than glittering setting, this is a literary memoir that opens readers’ eyes and minds and will not let go easily of their imaginations. About the Author Kris Advaya emerged from the void in Yugoslavia in the spring of 1976. After crawling his way through a stint in the military, and already multilingual, he spent five years studying French, Russian, and literature at the University of Ljubljana. Always artistic, he spent most of these years writing songs and abusing an electric guitar while playing with his alternative rock band. Soon afterwards, life took him to India and its enticing ways, and he’s been trying to cure himself of nomadism ever since. Let me be honest here, when I read the title of the book and the blurb my first impression was that it was part noir and part fiction. But the quirky title, along with the strikingly beautiful cover had me at the first glimpse and I had to read this one. I am so glad I did, without allowing my first impressions impact my overall opinion about the book. This book is part memoir, part travelogue, part romance, part biography - all put together so nicely, that when you finish reading it you have the satisfaction of having finished a wonderful read. For starters, the most impressive part of the book is that it no way shows India in poor light as a country, which otherwise is a common complaint I have while reading books on India by foreign authors. On the contrary , the author looks as inquisitive as me while describing all that he sees in the country. While it is interesting to note that the experiences mentioned there are scary to some extent, the author has used liberal doses of satire to make the moments light. Coming to the writing, well it just flows. Wacky, gripping, poignant and evocative in the perfect doses this book makes for an immersing read. I could very well believe it if someone told me this was fiction. Like the title suggests, there is quite a bit of spirituality also in those pages and no it doesn't sound preachy or boring at all. There is not a single dull moment in the whole book. It is like being on a roll with one adventure after the another to witness. The narrative is so descriptive that it feels as if you are watching a movie. The scenes unfold before your eyes as the characters take over your senses with their story. In those pages, a very different India comes alive. One that we live in no doubt, but seldom observe, like the author did. There were certain nuances brought out so beautifully that it filled me with pride. Though there are certain aspects of the plot that took me by surprise, there were many portions which left me beaming.A book that I really loved reading till the last word. to all , irrespective of your preferences in reading , this book is one that should not be missed at all! Foodie Verdict This book is like Russian Omelette- Full of surprises, you don't know what the next bite has to offer!

Vox Media's The Verge Staffs Up Culture Coverage | Media - AdAge

Sunday, November 19 2017

Vox Media's The Verge Staffs Up Culture Coverage | Media - AdAge

- Read additional free articles each month - Comment on articles and featured creative work - Get our curated newsletters delivered to your inbox Register Now By registering you agree to our privacy policy , terms & conditions and to receive occasional emails from Ad Age. You may unsubscribe at any time. Are you a print subscriber? Activate your account . Vox Media's The Verge Staffs Up Culture Coverage Tech Site Hires Editor From Music Mag The Fader By Tim Peterson . Published on March 24, 2014 . Don't call it a tech blog. Vox Media 's The Verge may be best known for its Apple event liveblogs and product design deep-dives, but the site has also reviewed films like "Divergent" and reported on the U.S. military's toxic burn pits . Now The Verge has staffed up a new editor as it looks to go from a tech news site to a popular culture publication for people who grew up on the internet. Having spent the last three years as editor-in-chief of music and cultural magazine The Fader, Matthew Schnipper has joined The Verge as its deputy managing editor to oversee long-form feature writing and culture coverage. "Our features have been a place where we put an enormous amount of focus. I had a hand in running features and longform, but I wanted somebody with real-world experience to take over some of that and expand it," The Verge's editor-in-chief Joshua Topolsky said. The Verge counts more than 40 employees on the editorial and operations side. It attracted 7.9 million U.S. unique visitors across desktop, smartphone and tablet browsers in February, according to comScore. The Verge's feature stories have earned the respect of media types for their content as well as novel presentation. A recent longread on tech brand devotees called "Fanboys" looks different on an iPhone than it does on an Android phone to underscore the thesis. "We were the first publication within the company to do longform. And that longform, by the way, predates [The New York Times' Pulitzer-winning feature] ' Snow Fall ' by like a year…. And in my opinion, 'Snow Fall' probably wouldn't have existed without what we started doing at The Verge," Mr. Topolsky said, noting that few online publishers were publishing "longform at scale" at the time of the site's November 2011 launch. In addition to differentiating The Verge from its perceived competition like AOL 's TechCrunch or Gawker's Gizmodo, the site uses its feature stories to stake a claim on new topics considered of interest to its audience but maybe not enough for constant coverage. For example, The Verge doesn't regularly report on architecture, but that didn't preclude it from examining the world's oldest subway tunnel . Now Mr. Schnipper will use the article format to expand The Verge's culture coverage in hopes of solidifying the site as not just another tech blog, like how Rolling Stone became more than a music magazine. "We consider [longform] to be the frontlines of our battle for expanding what we do and telling bigger, better stories. The longform stuff is on the frontlines of that and helps to shape where we're going and how big the stories can be and what kinds of stories we're particularly interested in," Mr. Topolsky said. Most Popular

Why India’s Commitment to Nuclear Disarmament is “Merely Rhetorical”

Saturday, November 18 2017

Why India’s Commitment to Nuclear Disarmament is “Merely Rhetorical”

By Urvashi Sarkar | 18 October 2017, the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), a coalition of non-governmental organisations across 100 countries , was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The award recognised ICAN’s role in bringing about the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons—the world’s first multilateral legally-binding instrument on nuclear disarmament in 20 years. All nine nuclear-weapon states, including India, refrained from participating in the treaty negotiations. While India, China and Pakistan abstained from voting on the United Nations General Assembly resolution that established the mandate for nations to negotiate the treaty, five nuclear countries—United States, United Kingdom, Russia, France, and Israel—voted against the resolution. The Indian government issued a statement explaining its abstention from the resolution on the day after the vote, in October last year. After claiming that “India attaches the highest priority to nuclear disarmament,” the statement noted that India was “not convinced” that the proposed negotiations could address the “longstanding expectation of the international community for a comprehensive instrument on nuclear disarmament.” The ICAN website notes that although India “regularly declares its support for the prohibition and elimination of nuclear weapons, its true commitment to nuclear disarmament remains in serious doubt.” India periodically supports calls for nuclear disarmament, but these assertions are contradicted by its continued possession of nuclear weapons and efforts to upgrade nuclear capabilities. For instance, during the Cold War, the then prime minister Jawaharlal Nehru made frequent appeals for disarmament to the United States and the Soviet Union. But later, in 1974, the Congress government led by Indira Gandhi conducted India’s first “peaceful nuclear explosion.” Again, in 1988, the then prime minister Rajiv Gandhi addressed the UN General Assembly in a seminal speech calling for an end to all nuclear testing . A decade later, the government led by Atal Bihari Vajpayee conducted a second round of tests and declared to the world that “India is now a nuclear weapons state.” That year, consistent with India’s contradictory statements on disarmament and weaponising, George Fernandes, the then defence minister, stated that the tests enabled India to “pursue, with credibility and greater conviction, our long-term campaign to rid the world of nuclear weapons.” Since then, India has made several statements in support of disarmament—for instance, at the 2010 Nuclear Security Summit, the former prime minister Manmohan Singh stated that “India has maintained an impeccable non-proliferation record, of which we are proud.” Simultaneously, India also continued to develop nuclear weapons. According to ICAN’s website, India possesses 110–120 of the nearly 15,000 nuclear warheads among the nine nuclear-weapon states in the world. As a result, civil-society organisations and individuals are sceptical of India’s commitment to disarmament. Tim Wright, the Asia-Pacific director of ICAN, addressed India’s refusal to sign the treaty prohibiting nuclear weapons, in an email. “ICAN has repeatedly urged the Indian government to sign the treaty. However, it has refused to do so, based on its misguided belief that nuclear weapons bring security,” Wright wrote. “India’s support for nuclear disarmament is, it seems, merely rhetorical.” Closer home, Indian civil-society groups, such as the Coalition for Nuclear Disarmament and Peace (CNDP)—a network of more than 200 Indian organisations against nuclear weapons—expressed similar concerns. Sukla Sen, a member of CNDP, said the organisation had made attempts to lobby the Indian government to sign the treaty, but with no success. “Some international peace activists were initially hopeful of India’s participation in the nuclear weapons ban treaty negotiations,” Sen told me. “For example, the nuclear-policy expert Alice Slater was hopeful that if India and Pakistan were properly lobbied, they would participate.” He added, “CNDP was not similarly optimistic and we communicated our apprehensions.” There appeared to be divided opinions on whether there had been a change in the nature of response under the present government led by Narendra Modi and the Bharatiya Janata Party. Wright told me, “We have discerned no difference in India’s policy on nuclear disarmament under prime ministers Narendra Modi and Manmohan Singh.” He added, “Neither leader has shown serious commitment to this cause.” Sen, on the other hand, told me that it had been more difficult to lobby with the BJP government. He said, “There is no channel of communication with the current regime. We made informal contact with government officials at seminars, but that was it.” According to Sen, the Congress was more open to communicating—he recalled that individuals such as Mani Shankar Aiyar had spoken up for the cause on several occasions. In 1988, Rajiv Gandhi proposed an action plan to the UN, for a world free of nuclear weapons. Decades later, in 2010, the former prime minister Manmohan Singh constituted an informal group , headed by Aiyar, to take the plan forward. “The group, among other things, recommended that India should pursue the matter bilaterally with various states,” Sen told me. “But this was not done, either multilaterally or bilaterally.” Arun Mitra, the senior vice president of the Indian Doctors for Peace and Development (IDPD), which also works closely with ICAN, told me that the difference is more starkly visible in the ground-level opposition to India’s nuclear tests by its citizens. “Nearly two lakh people had gathered for a peace march in Delhi in the mid 1980s opposing the nuclear arms race around the globe,” Mitra said. “Currently, we just cannot get similar numbers.” According to Mitra, this was a result of a complacency that had set in after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1990. He said, “People felt that since a unipolar world had emerged, the arms race of the Cold War era was over. But the future would throw up fresh complexities and new power centres. It was wrong to think that the arms race had ended.” Mitra appeared critical of the present BJP-led government’s discourse on disarmament. He said that the question of disarmament does not receive adequate attention, whereas “non-issues” appeared to dominate the political discourse under the BJP government. But he did give much credit to the Congress government either. “Even the previous government went ahead with the India-US civilian nuclear deal in the face of opposition,” he added. Mitra told me that the IDPD, CNDP and a host of other organisations plan to hold an international conference in Delhi, in 2018, which would seek to revive civil society action to pressurise the government towards disarmament. “We will invite trade unions, labour organisations and women’s groups. There is a need to rejuvenate the peace movement,” Mitra said. This is not the first time that the Indian government has stayed away from global disarmament efforts—successive Indian governments have refused to be part international treaties in the past as well. India has refused to be a signatory to the Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT) on the grounds that it is discriminates against states that tested nuclear weapons after 1967. In 1996, India refused to sign to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), which proposes to ban all future nuclear tests , also on the grounds that it was discriminatory towards countries that had not conducted nuclear tests at the time. With regard to India’s quest for membership of the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG)—a group of nuclear supplier countries that seek to prevent nuclear proliferation by controlling the export of materials used for developing nuclear weapons—in an opinion piece published in DNA India, the late political analyst and journalist Praful Bidwai had noted that despite initially opposing the NSG as unjust and arbitrary, India now seeks to be a member. Though China has ensured that India’s bid to gain membership to the group has been unsuccessful , it did not prevent India from gaining a unique waiver from the NSG in 2008, which permitted other countries to provide nuclear fuel, materials and technology to India. However, India has also consistently made the right noises on nuclear disarmament by periodically supporting it at the UN Conference on Disarmament, which was established in 1979 as the single multilateral negotiating forum of the international community for disarmament. In recent times, the Indian government has condemned North Korea’s nuclear tests, and in June 2016, India became is a member of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR), which seeks to limit the proliferation of missile weaponry and technology by limiting their exports. India is, however, simultaneously expanding its nuclear arsenal. According to a 2017 factsheet on trends in world nuclear forces , released by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute—an independent international institute that carries out research on issues surrounding conflict and arms control—“India is gradually expanding the size of its nuclear weapon stockpile as well as its infrastructure for producing nuclear warheads.” The factsheet noted that its stockpile had increased from 2016, when it had 110–120 warheads, to 120–130 in 2017. Even as a broad section of civil society has expressed disappointment about India’s refusal to sign the treaty, national security analyst Bharat Karnad, a research professor at the think tank Centre for Policy Research, feels otherwise. Over email, Karnad, who was a member of India’s first National Security Advisory Board, wrote that India’s decision not to support the non-proliferation treaty may have “conditioned the Modi government’s response.” “The Nobel Peace Prize to ICAN falls in the same category as that given to US President Barack Obama—a reward for good intentions,” he wrote. “ICAN might succeed in disarmament efforts, perhaps in a fantasy world.” According to Karnad,there is no contradiction between India’s possession of nuclear weapons and its repeated calls for disarmament. “From Nehru’s days, India has championed not just nuclear disarmament, but nuclear and general disarmament, including of conventional military.” He noted that in 1956, Krishna Menon, Nehru’s foreign policy advisor, “had warned in the UN that unless the then nuclear weapons powers disarmed fully, India would feel compelled to acquire these weapons.” He continued, “They didn’t pay heed, and India belatedly produced these weapons.” Urvashi Sarkar is an independent journalist based in Delhi and Mumbai.