Entertainment news Updates

ESAF kicks off operations in Mumbai| Plans to open 145 new branches

Wednesday, November 22 2017

ESAF kicks off operations in Mumbai| Plans to open 145 new branches

ESAF Small Finance Bank, the first bank from Kerala to win a banking license since independence, is all set to open its first branch in the metro city of Mumbai, on Nov 22, 2017. With an aim to build a pan India presence, ESAF bank will open 145 new banking outlets by March next year. Speaking at a press conference organised, Mr. K. Paul Thomas, Managing Director and CEO, ESAF Small Finance Bank said, “the banking outlet at Mumbai, Andheri East is the 60th outlet opened by ESAF, since it started operations in March this year. He also said that ESAF has presence in Maharashtra since 2004, with 33 micro banking outlets, especially in the Vidharbha region.” Currently, ESAF Small Finance Bank has 370 banking outlets including the 60 new retail banking outlets covering 10 states in India. In the coming months, the bank plans to open more number of outlets in the states where we already have presence and will be soon expanding to the North East as well. “We need to brand as a pan India bank and hence we have decided to open branches in all metro cities in India. A few more branches are coming in Mumbai soon along with other metros like Chennai, Bangalore, Hyderabad and Delhi, followed by Calcutta”, Mr. Thomas added. So far, the bank has crossed Rs 1000 crore deposit within seven months of operations. It hopes to garner a total of Rs 2500 crore deposit by the end of this fiscal. At the end of the second quarter, ESAF has a cumulative business of over 6,000 crore. The bank offers a host of modern banking services like ATMs, Debit Card, Safe Deposit Lockers, Internet banking, mobile banking, SMS banking, RTGS, NEFT and CTS etc. The door step delivery services, SKYPE facility at branches and Hrudaya Deposit Scheme are some of the exclusive features offered by ESAF Small Finance Bank.

A Series About Teens Who Turn Into Animals Taught Me How to Be Human

Tuesday, November 21 2017

A Series About Teens Who Turn Into Animals Taught Me How to Be Human

Author of the story collection Subcortical. www.leeconell.com Nov 21 A Series About Teens Who Turn Into Animals Taught Me How to Be Human How the ‘Animorphs’ books eased my transition into adulthood From the cover of Animorphs #27 Novel Gazing is Electric Literature’s personal essay series about the way reading shapes our lives. This time, we asked : What book was your feminist awakening? W hen I was nine years old, my best friend Max moved away. We had spent almost every day of elementary school together during recess and after school, making up new worlds and telling stories, even though as we got older our boy-girl friendship was something other kids sometimes teased us about. After Max moved, I still went to visit him every couple of months in New Jersey, and on one visit he showed me the book he was reading, part of a new series he was obsessed with. On the cover was a pretty blond girl — the kind of girl you might see advertising Coca-Cola or teeth-whitening chewing gum — turning into a grizzly bear. There were five versions of the girl. In the first she looked normal, totally human. In the next version, her arms and face thickened, rounded, and her face became newly hirsute. Behind that version, the girl’s face became covered in fur, and her open mouth showed sharp teeth. In the fourth, her blond hair had faded into her fur-covered torso, and her teeth had turned weapon. In the fifth image, she had gone total grizzly, covered in fur and growling. “Weird cover,” I said. “She’s an Animorph,” Max said. Then he explained the precipitating incident of the Animorphs series: A group of middle schoolers find a dying alien in a parking lot at night. The alien warns them that the Yeerks, a species of mind-controlling slugs, have begun to infect the human race. Someone you love might be controlled by a slug that has crawled into their mind and you wouldn’t even know it. The dying alien gives the kids the power to morph — to change into animals — and they begin a secret guerilla war against the Yeerks. The book Max was reading now was Animorphs #7, The Stranger . It was a lot of information to absorb. So I focused on the cover, the girl changing into a bear. That same year I’d been given one of those you-are-on-the-precipice-of-puberty books. I’d seen other books or pamphlets too, during doctor’s visits or in other kids’ bookshelves. It seemed there was a whole genre of writing readying me for puberty, educational books in which someone inevitability asked, “What is happening to me?” The question always sounded like the thing someone in a horror movie would say the second before they werewolfed hard. In the what-is-happening-to-me book I’d been given, one page showed all the stages in a girl’s transformation to woman. On the left side of the page, a drawing of a naked seven year old girl. Next to that image, a drawing of the same girl at ten, her hips rounding out. Another around thirteen, with breasts and a dark patch of pubic hair. Another around nineteen, all curves and huge dark nipples. Before my eyes, a naked girl morphed into a naked woman. That undeniable change seemed echoed on the cover of Animorphs #7, which I stared at for a while. In my mind’s eye I saw a farrago of girls going through puberty and girls turning into grizzly bears. In my mind’s eye I saw a farrago of girls going through puberty and girls turning into grizzly bears. I guarantee you this: Never once did I actually think, “Oh my god, I am on the verge of animorphing into puberty.” But the cover stuck with me enough that I convinced my mom to buy Animorphs #7 for me at the next Scholastic book sale ($3.99). I opened the book with some part of my brain expecting a science fiction story, and some deeper part of my brain hoping for the guide the what-is-happening-to-me book failed to be. I didn’t just need a guide to puberty. Since Max had moved away, I had an increasing sense that I was failing to morph socially. I tried to ingratiate myself into a group of girls in my class at school, mostly on the basis that I was a girl and supposed to hang out with other girls. They were not not nice to me. Still, there was a certain gap. I lived in Manhattan, but my dad was our building’s super and our apartment in the basement was rent-free. It wasn’t that we couldn’t get by, but we certainly didn’t have what many of these girls came equipped with: country homes, designer clothes, an impressive range of extracurriculars. I did my best to make up the difference by doing well in school and smiling hard at everyone. It worked okay. One of the girls had invited me to her birthday party, which, she informed me, would also be a makeup party. Making up for what? Ha-ha-ha-ha, she said, and I blushed, and she said there would be lipstick, mascara, other things, plus a fancy camera. We would each have our photographs taken in our lipstick and mascara and other things, and the photographs would be printed in sepia tones and placed for us in a golden frame and we would get to take the photo and the frame home that very same day. At my own birthday party that year, my parents had suggested we all take the Staten Island Ferry back and forth a couple of times. It was free. The makeup party sounded like it could be fun, and I definitely didn’t want to be left out, so I agreed to go. The day of the party I wore my hair down and put on a shirt I deemed “tastefully tie-dyed.” But once I got there, I quickly became terrified. Everyone put on so much makeup they looked like glamorous clowns, or children competing at a beauty pageant. Now these girls I knew stared sultrily into the camera like strangers. They batted their eyes, they posed in feather boas. I sat there unsure of myself, unready to be a part of whatever territory these girls sashayed toward. I sat there unsure of myself, unready to be a part of whatever territory these girls sashayed toward. In the end, I only put on a little makeup, a bit of blush and lipstick. In the glamour shot from that day, I am smiling but I am not showing my teeth, which the students at the NYU College of Dentistry would soon try desperately to straighten out. Everyone else’s photographs looked cutely silly (or sometimes cutely creepy) in their subjects’ attempts to seem adult. My photograph, with its sepia tint and closed-lip smile, resembled the old-fashioned daguerreotype a movie might display on a mantle to set up the presence of a child ghost. I looked pale and uncomfortable and the blush on my cheeks seemed to hint at an oncoming nineteenth-century-style Little-Women -ish death from scarlet fever. I had failed at the makeup party. Animorphs #7, the first Animorphs I ever read, is narrated by Rachel, the blond female Animorph who likes shopping and gymnastics. She is also the most ruthless and reckless warrior of the Animorphs, which later becomes a key character arc. In #7, there are only hints at her ferocity. The book opens with Rachel wanting to scare an elephant trainer into ceasing to use his cattle prod to control his circus elephants. So she sneaks into the elephant pen at night and morphs into an elephant herself. “People say I’m pretty,” Rachel confides in the reader. “I don’t know and I really don’t care. But I’ll tell you one thing — no one who has ever seen me morph into an elephant ever used the word pretty to describe it.” There is a real grossness to all descriptions of the morphing process, a grossness that helps them seem less like fiction. “I felt the teeth in the front of my mouth run together,” Rachel narrates as she turns into an elephant, “and then begin to grow and grow into long, spear-length tusks. It’s a creepy sensation, by the way. Not painful, but definitely creepy.” Not painful but definitely creepy. This felt refreshingly truthful. In the what-is-happening-to-mebooks, the process of turning from a girl into a woman was often described as beautiful. Natural. Normal. But nothing about that process seemed normal to me. And a fair amount seemed unsettling. I liked how Animorphs described the morphing as awkward, and a little disgusting. It reminded me of the in-between space the girls had been in at the make-up party. The process of turning from a girl into a woman was often described as beautiful. Natural. Normal. But nothing about that process seemed normal to me. Once Rachel turns into an elephant, she roars an elephant’s trumpeting roar, and the trainer comes running. She waits until he’s all the way in the pen, and then she grabs him around the waist with her trunk, lifts him up and, using the Animorphs’ gift of thought-speak (they can think right into someone’s mind while in a morph, sort of like a psychic form of texting), claims to be from the International Elephant Police. She tells the trainer there have been some complaints about him and that he must stop using the cattle prod to control his elephants. If he doesn’t, she will come back and destroy him. The trainer acquiesces to her demands and she tosses him twenty feet away, where he lands safely (so says the narration) on a tent. I was exhilarated. Here a pretty girl had shed her pretty girl-ness, morphed into an elephant, ordered a man to stop his wrongdoings, and succeeded. She had changed — awkwardly and disgustingly — into something more powerful. She had been listened to by someone who in most cases would be the more powerful male adult. I was told that films like this exploited young women, but for me, it didn’t feel degrading—it felt familiar electricliterature.com Later in the book, Rachel and the other Animorphs morph into cockroaches in order to spy on the Yeerks. This was more familiar to me than the whole elephant thing. In our basement apartment, we were always dealing with cockroaches. After Rachel turns into a cockroach, she finds the cockroach brain is full of fear. “When you first morph into an animal, it is almost always a struggle to adjust to its particular instincts,” she says. This, too, made sense to me. When you turned into some other form, you were faced with new demands, both internal and external. Certainly I’d felt this at the makeup party — my desire to run and to fit in, my desire to appear attractive but not necessarily womanly. But only a few pages later Rachel has grappled with much of the cockroach’s fear. She admits it’s pretty cool how, in the roach form, she can run straight up most walls. Rachel’s ability to shift forms didn’t just make her powerful, but expanded her perceptions of the world. Animorphs #7began to offer me a whole new world of different transformations a person could undergo. It wasn’t that I actually believed I would turn into an elephant or a cockroach. I simply appreciated the beauty of being offered an escape from the relentless narrative of a single transformation: girl to woman. In Animorphs, things could be funkier than that. You could change in other ways. You could change into something more powerful, or something more fearful, and all these changes could lead you to ultimately morph into someone who was more empathetic. You could change into something more powerful, or something more fearful, and all these changes could lead you to ultimately morph into someone who was more empathetic. I’d love to say the lessons I learned from Animorphs had an immediate effect on me. I’d love to say I went to another makeup party post- Animorphs #7 and that I was blissfully empowered. I’d love to say that I put on makeup so I looked like some kind of formidable beast, that I smiled huge at the camera, fiercely toothed and fiercely clawed. I’d love to say that when I put on makeup, I put aside my insecurities about myself around these girls with their above-ground apartments and extracurricular well-roundedness, and just embraced who I was and who I might be. But nope. I went on to avoid those kinds of parties like the Yeerks themselves might be in attendance. Instead of more makeup parties, I let myself become deeply obsessed with a book series. I spent hours and hours analyzing Animorphs online with total strangers and, when the Animorphs TV show came out on Nickelodeon, ranting against all the inaccuracies of the television show. In a way, rather than obviously transforming me, Animorphs  — to use another animal metaphor — provided for me a kind of cocoon, a safe space where I could hang out and think about what kind of animal I might want to turn into, or at least what kind of metamorphoses I might want to write about. Even more essentially, inside the cocoon of the series, I saw stories could help you grow in ways that felt more interesting than the growth offered by the what-is-happening-to-me books. Stories could be an escape, yeah, but they also could briefly “morph” you into the mind of somebody else, expanding your sense of the world. When I write stories now — even when I write stories about my past self — there is always that sense, however fleeting, of transformation. Of hanging out in some other creature’s headspace. At the end of the story, I morph back into myself, only I’m changed. I’ve been some other thing, something the what’s-happening-to-me books could never have predicted. But Animorphs in some way predicted these shifts for me, these expansive moments that were the result of hurtling into and out of puberty — that were the result of encroaching adulthood. A new form, the series had hinted, might give you the ability to look harder not just at the shape of your own experience, but also at the shapes of other lives.

Chief Justice Mohit Shah Made an Offer of Rs 100 Crore to My Brother for a Favourable Judgment in the Sohrabuddin Case: Late Judge Loya’s Sister

Tuesday, November 21 2017

Chief Justice Mohit Shah Made an Offer of Rs 100 Crore to My Brother for a Favourable Judgment in the Sohrabuddin Case: Late Judge Loya’s Sister

By Niranjan Takle | 21 Brijgopal Harkishan Loya, the judge presiding over the CBI special court in Mumbai, died sometime between the night of 30 November and the early morning of 1 December 2014, while on a trip to Nagpur. At the time of his death, he was hearing the Sohrabuddin case, in which the prime accused was the Bharatiya Janata Party president Amit Shah. The media reported at the time that Loya had died of a heart attack. But my investigations 2017 raised disturbing questions about the death—including questions regarding the condition of his his family. Among those I spoke to was one of Loya’s sisters, Anuradha Biyani, a medical doctor based in Dhule, Maharashtra. Biyani made an explosive claim to me: Loya, she said, confided to her that Mohit Shah, then the chief justice of the Bombay High Court, had offered him a bribe of Rs 100 crore in return for a favourable judgment. She said Loya had told her this some weeks before he died, when the family gathered for Diwali at their ancestral home in Gategaon. Loya’s father Harkishan also told me that his son had told him he had offers to deliver a favourable judgment in exchange for money and a house in Mumbai. Brijgopal Harkishan Loya was appointed to the special CBI court in June 2014, after his predecessor, JT Utpat, was transferred within weeks of reprimanding Amit Shah for seeking an exemption from appearing in court. According to a February 2015 report in Outlook , “During the CBI court’s hearings that Utpat presided over for this one year, or even after, court records suggest Amit Shah had never turned up even once—including on the final day of discharge. Shah’s counsel apparently made oral submissions for exempting him from personal appearance on grounds ranging from him being ‘a diabetic and hence unable to move’ to the more blase: ‘he is busy in Delhi.’” The Outlook report continued: “On June 6, 2014, Utpat had made his displeasure known to Shah’s counsel and, while allowing exemption for that day, ordered Shah’s presence on June 20. But he didn’t show up again. According to media reports, Utpat told Shah’s counsel, ‘Every time you are seeking exemption without giving any reason.’” Utpat, the story noted, “fixed the next hearing for June 26. But on 25th, he was transferred to Pune.” This was in violation of a September 2012 Supreme Court order, that the Sohrabuddin trial “should be conducted from beginning to end by the same officer.” Loya had at first appeared well disposed towards Shah’s request that he be exempted from personally appearing in court. As Outlook noted, “Utpat’s successor Loya was indulgent, waiving Shah’s personal appearance on each date.” But this apparent indulgence may just have been a matter of procedure. According to the Outlook story, “significantly, one of his last notings stated that Shah was being exempted from personal appearance ‘till the framing of charges.’ Loya had clearly not harboured the thought of dropping charges against Shah even when he appeared to be gentle on him.” According to the lawyer Mihir Desai, who represented Sohrabuddin’s brother Rubabuddin—the complainant in the case—Loya was keen on scrutinising the entire chargesheet, which ran to more than 10,000 pages, and on examining the evidence and witnesses carefully. “The case was sensitive and important, and it was going to create and decide the reputation of Mr Loya as a judge,” Desai said. “But the pressure was certainly mounting.” a niece of Loya’s who stayed with his family in Mumbai while studying in the city, told me about the extent of the pressure she witnessed her uncle facing. “When he was coming from the court, he was like, ‘ bahut tension hai ,’” she said. “Stress. It’s a very big case. How to deal with it. Everyone is involved with it.” Nupur said it was a question of “political values.” Desai told me, “The courtroom always used to be extremely tense. The defence lawyers used to insist on discharging Amit Shah of all the charges, while we were demanding for the transcripts of the calls, submitted as evidence by the CBI, to be provided in English.” He pointed out that neither Loya nor the complainant understood Gujarati, the language on the tapes. But the defence lawyers, Desai said, repeatedly brushed aside the demands for transcripts in English, and insisted that Shah’s discharge petition be heard. Desai added that his junior lawyers often noticed unknown, suspicious-looking people inside the courtroom, whispering and staring at the complainant’s lawyers in an intimidating manner. Desai recounted that during a hearing on 31 October, Loya asked why Shah was absent. His lawyers pointed out that he had been exempted from appearance by Loya himself. Loya remarked that the exemption applied only when Shah was not in the state. That day, he said, Shah was in Mumbai to attend the swearing-in of the new BJP-led government in Maharashtra, and was only 1.5 kilometres away from the court. He instructed Shah’s counsel to ensure his appearance when he was in the state, and set the next hearing for 15 December. Anuradha Biyani told me that Loya confided in her that Mohit Shah, who served as the chief justice of the Bombay High Court between June 2010 and September 2015, offered Loya a bribe of Rs 100 crore for a favourable judgment. According to her, Mohit Shah “would call him late at night to meet in civil dress and pressure him to issue the judgment as soon as possible and to ensure that it is a positive judgment.” According to Biyani, “My brother was offered a bribe of 100 crore in return for a favourable judgment. Mohit Shah, the chief justice, made the offer himself.” She added that Mohit Shah told her brother that if “the judgment is delivered before 30 December, it won’t be under focus at all because at the same time, there was going to be another explosive story which would ensure that people would not take notice of this.” Loya’s father Harkishan also told me that his son had confided in him about bribe offers. “Yes, he was offered money,” Harkishan said. “Do you want a house in Mumbai, how much land do you want, how much money do you want, he used to tell us this. This was an offer.” But, he added, his son refused to succumb to the offers. “He told me I am going to turn in my resignation or get a transfer,” Harkishan said. “I will move to my village and do farming.” I contacted Mohit Shah and Amit Shah for their responses to the family’s claims. At the time this story was published, they had not responded. The story will be updated if and when they reply. After Loya’s death, MB Gosavi was appointed to the Sohrabuddin case. Gosavi began hearing the case on 15 December 2014. “He heard the defence lawyers argue for three days to discharge Amit Shah of all the charges, while the CBI, the prosecuting agency, argued for 15 minutes,” Mihir Desai said. “He concluded the hearing on 17 December and reserved his order.” On 30 December, around one month after Loya’s death, Gosavi upheld the defence’s argument that the CBI had political motives for implicating the accused. With that, he discharged Amit Shah. The same day, news of MS Dhoni’s retirement from test cricket dominated television screens across the country. As Biyani recounted, “There was just a ticker at the bottom which said, ‘Amit Shah not guilty. Amit Shah not guilty.’” Mohit Shah visited the grieving family only around two and half months after Loya’s death. From Loya’s family, I obtained a copy of a letter that they said Anuj, Loya’s son, wrote to his family on the day of the then chief justice’s visit. It is dated 18 February 2015—80 days after Loya’s death. Anuj wrote, “I fear that these politicians can harm any person from my family and I am also not powerful enough to fight with them.” He also wrote, referring to Mohit Shah, “I asked him to set up an enquiry commission for dad’s death. I fear that to stop us from doing anything against them, they can harm anyone of our family members. There is threat to our lives.” Anuj wrote twice in the letter that “if anything happens to me or my family, chief justice Mohit Shah and others involved in the conspiracy will be responsible.” When I met him in November 2016, Loya’s father Harkishan said, “I am 85 and I am not scared of death now. I want justice too, but I am extremely scared for the life of my daughters and grandchildren.” He had tears in his eyes as he spoke, and his gaze went often to the garlanded photograph of Loya hanging on the wall of the ancestral home. Niranjan Takle is an electronics engineer by training and a journalist by choice. He has worked for CNN-IBN and The Week , among other organisations.

(Video) The Testimonies of the Late Judge BH Loya’s Family, Which Raise Disturbing Questions Regarding His Death

Tuesday, November 21 2017

(Video) The Testimonies of the Late Judge BH Loya’s Family, Which Raise Disturbing Questions Regarding His Death

By The Caravan | 21 In June 2014, Brijgopal Harkishan Loya was appointed the judge in the special CBI court in Mumbai. The court was hearing the Sohrabuddin case, in which the Bharatiya Janata Party president Amit Shah was the prime accused. Loya died on the intervening night between 30 November and 1 December 2014. The media reported that the judge died of a heart attack. Loya’s family did not speak to the media after his death. In November 2016, Loya’s niece, approached the journalist Niranjan Takle. Over several meetings 2017, Takle spoke to her mother, Anuradha Biyani, who is Loya’s sister and a medical doctor in government service; another of Loya’s sisters, Sarita Mandhane; and Loya’s father, Harkishan. From these accounts, deeply disturbing questions emerged about Loya’s death: questions about inconsistencies in the reported account of the death; about the procedures followed after the judge died; and about the condition of his the family. The family also described the pressures and inducements Loya faced while presiding over the Sohrabuddin trial. According to Biyani, Loya confided in her that Mohit Shah, then the chief justice of the Bombay High Court offered Loya “a bribe of 100 crore in return for a favourable judgement.” Though Loya’s family asked for an inquiry commission to probe his death, none was ever set up. Read Takle’s report on the disturbing death here . Read Takle’s report on the pressures Loya faced while presiding over the Sohrabuddin trial here .

APEC khawmpuiah President Trump-an New Zealand PM hai lo

Monday, November 20 2017

APEC khawmpuiah President Trump-an New Zealand PM hai lo

APEC khawmpuiah President Trump-an New Zealand PM hai lo By 25 views Kar hmasa-a APEC khawmpui-ah khan US President Donald Trump chuan New Zeland PM thar, Jacinda Ardern chu Canada PM, Justin Trudeau-a nupui emaw a ti nia sawi chu thu dik lo niin Ardern hian a sawi. Trudeau hian ram dang hruaitute nen a inhmelhriattir laiin, Trump chuan Ardern hi Trudeau-a nupui emaw a ti niin media miten an theh darh nasa hle a, mahse Ardern chuan Trump hi mi dangin an lo hre sual nia sawiin, media miten an thehdarh hma pawhin a chhung leh \hiante bulah pawh a lo sawi chhawng daih tawh niin a sawi a ni.

Thazual 10 (Fakna) 21st Nov 2017: Tun kar chart-ah R.Lalrinmawii (Arini) pakhatna a ni

Monday, November 20 2017

Thazual 10 (Fakna) 21st Nov 2017: Tun kar chart-ah R.Lalrinmawii (Arini) pakhatna a ni

Chanchinthar dah dan hi A mal te te hian a tha A hlawm zelin a tha (Tualchhung zawng hmun khatah, ram chhung leh ram pawn pawh hmun khatah)

Dr. Jagannathrao G. Hegde honored with IEBF Excellence Award

Tuesday, November 21 2017

Dr. Jagannathrao G. Hegde honored with IEBF Excellence Award

Dr. Jagannathrao G. Hegde, a dental surgeon, a social worker, an educationist, a sports administrator and patron and a cultural activist and former Sheriff of Mumbai has been honored with the prestigious IEBF Excellence Award in Health Category by The Indo European Business Forum (IEBF). The ceremony took place at The House of Lords (UK Parliament), Westminster, London. Dr. Jagannathrao G. Hegde noted citizen of Mumbai has been actively and extensively involved for over five decades in serving the society and has received numerous awards and honors for his dedication to the cause of humanity. On expressing his gratitude Dr. Hegde said , “I am honored to receive this award from IEBF which is a prestigious global platform. Throughout my life I have been serving the needy and will continue my good deed towards them. I am pleased that my efforts are recognized and will keep doing this work for the welfare of the society.” Some of his noted contributions include; Sheriff of Mumbai (2004-2006) where he coined the slogan of ‘ Green Mumbai, Healthy Mumbai and Clean Mumbai ’. He has been actively organizing annual dental & medical camps and blood donation drives for the poor and needy. He has been the Vice-Chairman for the Central Advisory Board for Child Labor where has helped in the rehabilitation, education and employment of children. He has also been associated with Lions Club, Rotary Club, Siddhivinayak Temple Trust, Shivaji Park Gymkhana where his contribution and good deeds have received great appreciation. A Dental surgeon by profession, he has been the Dental Director of D.Y. Patil College and Hospital, Navi Mumbai in 1990. He has also been the Trustee of National Education Society, Chairman of Ethical Committee of the R.A. Podar College and Hospital, Worli. Dr. Hegde has dedicated his entire life to the welfare of the people; even today he is actively participating in cultural, social and medical events and contributing to the society. His dynamic approach and decisive efforts have resulted in honoring him with many accolades.

GoAir expands operations at Chennai | Inducts four A320 NEOs.

Tuesday, November 21 2017

GoAir expands operations at Chennai | Inducts four A320 NEOs.

GoAir, one of India’s fastest growing airlines, is set to increase its operations with the launch of six all new additional flights in and out of Chennai, for the winter schedule effective from November 23, 2017. The addition of these new daily direct services will bolster GoAir’s offering to Chennai further strengthening the airline’s growing domestic network and significantly enhancing connectivity for passengers. The induction of new A320 NEOs will see GoAir’s fleet strength touch to 31 aircraft. To commensurate its twelve successful years in the domestic skies, GoAir has also announced an exciting anniversary fare offer starting from Rs 1212 plus taxes on all new sectors. Booking period will be from November 18 to 21, 2017 for the travel period from November 24, 2017 to October 28, 2018. The special fares will be valid only for individual bookings for travel on direct flights on GoAir network. Available on a first come-first serve basis, bookings for travel can be made across all channels Speaking about the network expansion Jeh Wadia, Managing Director, GoAir said “The induction of four new aircraft will cater to the enhanced seasonal demand whilst offering flexibility to customers with more flight options to choose from. It is our constant endeavor to provide more flexibility of choice for our customers and offer them seamless connectivity, hassle free and affordable flying experience.” Tickets for the flights are now open and can be booked through the company website, www.Goair.in or online travel portals, GoAir Call Centre, airport ticketing offices, through travel agents and GoAir App that is available on both Apple iOS and Google Android. Passengers will be required to download the latest version of the App to be able to make the bookings.

Untitled (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dz27Fd90rLs)

Saturday, November 25 2017

Untitled (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dz27Fd90rLs)

Rating is available when the video has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on Nov 2, 2017 Celebrate Your #NextVictory with Mumm Champagne and Usain Bolt, visit www.mumm.co/nextvictory Category

Naseeruddin Shah: Is our faith so small that it gets endangered by a movie?

Sunday, November 26 2017

Naseeruddin Shah: Is our faith so small that it gets endangered by a movie?

Naseeruddin Shah: Is our faith so small that it gets endangered by a movie? Rachana Dubey Film bans, censorship and death threats — the veteran actor says it like it is! | TNN | Nov 26, 2017, 01:00 IST Naseeruddin Shah Naseeruddin Shah is known to speak his mind. This actor doesn't mince words or thoughts — a rare quality these days. While there's plenty on his mind all the time, right now, he's irked about 'Nude', a Marathi film that features him, and the ire it's facing, owing to its title and supposed content. In a conversation with BT, the actor makes a terse point about how the definition of freedom of speech has changed over the years, and how we have lost our sense of humour with it. Excerpts: 'Nude' was dropped from the list of films that were screened in the Indian Panorama section at the International Film Festival of India (IFFI), which led to an outrage. What do you make of it? It's absurd! The reason they gave, finally, after much begging, is that it's an incomplete film, which is absolute rubbish because several times, films are sent to festivals as work-in-progress copies. I don't think anyone even knows what the film is all about. They've simply recoiled at the mention of the title. I think it's an appropriate title and the film deserves to be seen. It's arbitrary and scary that the government has now decided to assume the role of a censor. What do you think has triggered all this? 'Nude' has not even been seen by the Censor Board, they've just recently passed the trailer. I feel Pahlaj Nihalani was only a mouthpiece. That his reasoning was completely idiotic is a different matter. This is an age of moral policing and prudery. Look at the rising number of young couples being harassed on the roads, or even the way Mithali Raj and Priyanka Chopra were trolled for merely wearing a skirt and a dress. Sania Mirza has been a regular target for these people. We live in scary times. Are these the things we should be getting habituated to? We can't expect the film industry to come out in support of movies like 'S Durga ' and 'Nude', can we? But during the 'Udta Punjab' controversy, sections of the film industry did come out in support of it... (Cuts in) Let's see how many come out in support of 'Padmavati'. No one has spoken yet. Just how thin-skinned have we become that we take offense against just about anything. Is our faith so small that it gets endangered by a movie? Are our beliefs that fragile that the world will start believing a movie, and not what has come down as legend? How insecure are we? Today, when thousands are rising in protest, I wonder how easily our sensibilities can be flamed. What runs across your mind when you hear threats to maim and behead people being made on public platforms? What is frightening is that none of these people have really bothered to see the film. They are just determined to crush anything that has a whiff of an independent sensibility. For God's sake, it's just a movie! That is the trouble with our country. Our audience swallows so much crap because they think that the actors and technicians were out on a holiday while making a movie. I am not a part of 'Padmavati', and neither have I seen it, but I've seen Bhansali's work. He puts his all into the film. Most people who're commenting about Nude also have probably not seen the film. Do you think it's a reactionary syndrome where people act merely on what they hear? It's beyond comprehension for me. Probably, it's just the title in case of Nude. These days, it's difficult to make a small film like Nude without facing issues like money and time crunches. We expect a more enlightened reaction from the government. People believe a film like S Durga is defaming the goddess, as if there is no other girl by that name. There are so many books that mock the Bible and aspects of Christianity. We had also banned Jesus Christ Super Star (a stage musical that faced a ban for about 25 years). We're the protectors of every government's faith, or so it seems, whether they care or not. Some people are convinced that what they are doing — threats of arson and all — is right. They are misguided people. I'm sure we have an equal number of people who feel alienated from this kind of philosophy. Years ago, we could make a film like 'Bombay' with relative ease, although it also had its share of controversies. Do you think one can attempt a film like that today? Today, you can't even shoot the last scene of 'Jaane Bhi Do Yaaro', let alone a film like Bombay. Why? It's because we've clearly lost our sense of humour. What everyone talks about till date is 'Jaane Bhi Do Yaaro's' last scene. You wouldn't be able to shoot it if it were to be made today because of self-censorship, the threat of someone damaging your set, or for that matter, the fear of your film not releasing. Come to think of it: several interesting films have been screened at IFFI, but it was 'S Durga' and 'Nude's' elimination that grabbed headlines. The controversies around the festival have done films like 'S Durga' and 'Nude' some good. Everyone is at least talking about them. People were curious about 'Nude' anyway. It's heartening to see the way the Marathi filmmakers are rallying for the film. And it's not surprising. Neither is the fact that not one filmmaker (from Bollywood) has come forth to speak for 'Padmavati'. Maybe it's difficult to do that. Do you think all these episodes will ever let any filmmaker present an independent interpretation of literature, culture or a popular thought in our movies? At the moment, it seems difficult, though this can't last. These two films ('S Durga' and 'Nude') deserved to be seen internationally. Now, it's to be seen whether they are barred completely from being sent to any film festival. I won't be too surprised if that happens. The definition of freedom of speech has changed. Now, anything dissenting is seen as abuse of freedom of speech. The space for rational debate has shrunk. It's not possible anymore. I posted a statement by Albert Einstein once on a social media page, which had something to do with war. The amount of abuse I got for it was astounding. I can understand what happened when I commented on Rajesh Khanna, he has a fan-following. While I don't take back what I said, I apologised to Dimple Kapadia and her daughter (Twinkle Khanna). These days, you just can't speak. It's scary. Get latest news & live updates on the go on your pc with News App . Download The Times of India news app for your device. RELATED

An Investigation Into Judge Loya’s Death Will Assure Subordinate Court Judges That “They Are Not Orphans”: Retired High Court Justice BH Marlapalle

Saturday, November 25 2017

An Investigation Into Judge Loya’s Death Will Assure Subordinate Court Judges That “They Are Not Orphans”: Retired High Court Justice BH Marlapalle

By The Caravan | 25 November 2017 Previous Next Print | E-mail | Single Page BH Marlapalle, a retired judge of the Bombay High Court, has written to Manjula Chellur, the chief justice of the high court, urging an “investigation by an SIT” into the suspicious circumstances surrounding the death of the judge BH Loya. Marlapalle’s letter is dated 21 November—the day after The Caravan published a series of investigative reports on significant discrepancies between the reported account of Loya’s death, and the accounts of his family. Marlapalle states in his letter that he “firmly” believed that this is a case fit for a probe by a special investigation team “irrespective of its outcome at this point of time.” He notes that the Supreme Court, while interpreting Article 235 of the constitution, has “repeatedly stated that the High Court is the guardian of the subordinate judiciary.” He goes on to state that “ordering an investigation by an SIT by registering this article”—referring to The Caravan ’s reports—“as a PIL petition, will certainly make the subordinate court judges to believe that they are not orphans.” At the time of his death, on the intervening night of 30 November and 1 December 2014, Loya was presiding over a Central Bureau of Investigation court that was hearing the case on the allegedly fake encounter killing of Sohrabuddin. The accused persons in the case included Amit Shah, the president of the Bharatiya Janata Party, and several senior police officers from Gujarat. Marlapalle is not the only retired high court judge to have demanded a probe into the disturbing allegations arising out of his death—on 23 November, AP Shah, a retired chief justice of the Delhi High Court, in an interview to The Wire , also said that the matter should be investigated. Shah said, “I feel it is very necessary that the chief justice of the high court or the chief justice of India himself should look into this material and decide whether to order an enquiry.” “Not enquiring into the allegations made by the family would send a very wrong signal to the judiciary, particularly the lower cadre,” he added. “As it is, in recent times there are several self-inflicted wounds on the judiciary and I feel that such matters should be investigated.” Marlapalle told The Caravan that he had received the “speed-post delivery report” of his letter, which confirmed that the chief justice Chellur had received his letter “on 23rd at 5 o’clock.” He added that he also “sent copies of the letter to the other senior-most five judges” of the Bombay High Court—VK Tahilramani , NH Patil , SS Kemkar , A S Oka , and Anoop V Mohta. He explained that he sent the letter to the other judges “hoping that the administrative judges will collectively think on what needs to be done.” Marlapalle’s letter concludes on a note requesting the chief justice’s “kind and urgent attention to do the needful.” Over the phone, Marlapalle emphasised that he added the word “urgent” because the chief justice Chellur would soon be retiring. On the eve of her sixty-second birthday, Chellur will retire from service on 4 December. More From This Section

Raptors Post-Game: Kyle Lowry - November 22, 2017 - YouTube

Thursday, November 23 2017

Raptors Post-Game: Kyle Lowry - November 22, 2017 - YouTube

The interactive transcript could not be loaded. Loading... Rating is available when the video has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on Nov 22, 2017 Kyle Lowry addresses the media following Toronto's 108-100 road loss against New York on Wednesday night. Category