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Karnataka government employees seek five-day week at work

Tuesday, January 2 2018

Karnataka government employees seek five-day week at work

Home » Karnataka » You are reading » Karnataka government employees seek five-day week at work admin January 2, 2018 Karnataka government employees seek five-day week at work 2018-01-02T03:27:15+00:00 Karnataka No Comment Karnataka government employees seek five-day week at work Buckling under the work pressure, state government employees have requested the Sixth Pay Commission to grant them a five-day working schedule and also a hike in their pay. Karnataka State Government Employees’Association (KSGES) president BP Manjegowda told Bangalore Mirror that a five-day working schedule was a must as the work load and pressure can be too much to handle otherwise. “As of now, work load has increased on the present employees as about 2.80 lakh posts are lying vacant in various departments of the government. The memorandum has been submitted to the commission two months ago,” he explained. If this demand is granted, Karnataka’s state government employees will not be the first ones in the country to get a five-day work schedule. It is already in force at the Centre and in some states. Manjegowda said that commission chairman MR Srinivasmurthy has assured him that the pros and cons of the memorandum would be studied and a report would be submitted to the government. “We have appealed that the working hours be changed from 10 am to 6 pm instead of 10 am to 5 pm and also cut lunch hours to half-an-hour instead of one hour to compensate for the additional holiday the association has sought,” he said. Srinivasmurthy told BM “various government employees’ associations have submitted several demands to the commission. The commission has time till the end of January 2018 to study the demands and submit a report. http://www.stategovernmentnews.in/karnataka-government-employees-seek-five-day-week-work/ 2018-01-02T03:27:15+00:00 admin Karnataka 6th pay commission,7th pay commission,Karnataka government employees,Karnataka Government News,Karnataka State government employees,Karnataka state government news,KSGES,state government employees Karnataka government employees seek five-day week at work Buckling under the work pressure, state government employees have requested the Sixth Pay Commission to grant them a five-day working schedule and also a hike in their pay. Karnataka State Government Employees'Association (KSGES) president BP Manjegowda told Bangalore Mirror that a five-day working...

The 1991 Soviet internet helped stop a coup and spread a message of freedom.

Monday, January 1 2018

The 1991 Soviet internet helped stop a coup and spread a message of freedom.

The citizen’s guide to the future. Aug. 19 2016 2:17 PM An Act of Courage on the Soviet Internet In 1991, programmers helped stop a coup and spread a message of freedom. Russian President Boris Yeltsin shaking hands with an unidentified tank crew member as supporters turned out to celebrate the collapse of the three-day coup in 1991. Andre Durand/AFP/Getty Images This essay is adapted from The Red Web: The Struggle Between Russia’s Digital Dictators and the New Online Revolutionaries , by Andrei Soldatov and Irina Borogan, published by PublicAffairs. Early in the morning on Aug. 19, 1991, a phone call woke Valery Bardin at home. A journalist friend said he had heard, from Japanese contacts, of an attempted coup against President Mikhail Gorbachev. Advertisement The news about the putsch broke first in the Far East, then rolled westward across the time zones before hitting Moscow. Hours after the announcement was first broadcast in the Far East, it aired on television in Moscow. Valery Bardin was a head of a bunch of programmers of the very first Soviet internet service provider, known then as Demos/Relcom. The first Soviet connection to the global internet was made almost exactly a year before, on Aug. 28, 1990, when programmers at the Kurchatov Institute, the main nuclear research facility in the Soviet Union and home to the team of programmers working with UNIX (the Russian version was known as DEMOS, an acronym for the Russian words meaning “dialogue united mobile operating system”), exchanged emails with a university in Helsinki,. The programmers had already established connections with research centers in Dubna, Serpukhov, and Novosibirsk. Get Future Tense in your inbox. The network used telephone lines, and the bandwidth was extremely narrow—the network was capable only of exchanging simple emails. They named their network Relcom (from English—RELiable COMmunications). The core of the network was based in the Computation Center of the Kurchatov Institute, led by Alexey Soldatov—Andrei’s father. By the summer of 1991, Relcom had a leased line to Helsinki, and the internal Soviet network had reached 70 cities, with more than 400 organizations using it, including universities, research institutes, stock and commodity exchanges, high schools, and government agencies. Advertisement Technically Relcom had two headquarters. There were a few rooms on the third floor at the Computation Center at the Kurchatov Institute, which housed the main server built on the IBM 386 personal computer. Modems at 9,600 bits per second were permanently connected to the international phone line. The other headquarters was located in the nondescript mansion on the Moscow River embankment, with the second floor housing the team of 14 Demos programmers working night and day repairing and improving software and maintaining the network. They also had a backup server and a 9,600-baud modem. Bardin’s first reaction was to check the group’s server from home. There was no connection. He went out to buy cigarettes. On his way he met a friend and colleague from Leningrad (now St. Petersburg), Dmitry Burkov. Together they rushed to the Demos building, knowing there was always someone sitting there, day and night. They saw tanks on the streets of Moscow. Around 7 a.m., on the orders of the defense minister, Dmitry Yazov, who had joined the coup plotters, tank units began moving into the city along parachute regiments in armored troop carriers. Strict censorship was imposed on the news media. State television introduced Gennady Yanayev, a Soviet vice president and gray, unremarkable figure, as the new leader of the country. In fact, Yanayev was given this role only to make the ousting of Gorbachev look more legitimate. The real mastermind was Vladimir Kryuchkov, chairman of the KGB, and the KGB had a prime role in orchestrating the coup. KGB special operations forces were dispatched to Crimea, where Gorbachev was on vacation. The KGB cut off Gorbachev’s personal phone line from his vacation compound, then the local phone lines. He was totally isolated. Advertisement By coincidence, the putsch began on the opening day of a Moscow computer expo. The nascent business of Relcom/Demos had a stand at the show, and some programmers were milling about there. The first thing Bardin did when he arrived at the Demos two-story building was to call the expo and order everyone to return to the office as quickly as possible with their equipment. The network connection had been off because of technical problems, but it was soon restored. As chief of the team based at the Demos building, Bardin took over. That day Alexey Soldatov, head of the Kurchatov office, was far out of town, in Vladikavkaz in the North Caucasus. But after hearing about the putsch and consulting with Bardin, called his people at the Computation Center. To both teams he insisted on one thing: Keep the line open ! Someone at the Computation Center suggested they attempt to print up Yeltsin’s proclamations, but Soldatov was adamant: focus on maintaining the connection—this was vital. Later that day, a guest knocked on the door of the office at the Demos building and said he was a representative of the Yeltsin team. He said he was looking for the commercial offices that had Xerox machines to help them disseminate Yeltsin’s appeals. Bardin told him to forget about Xerox. He explained that they had the computer network connected to all big cities and the West. The Yeltsin man slipped away without another word. Then another Yeltsin envoy appeared at the building and declared authoritatively that they were now all under command of Konstantin Kobets, who had been deputy chief of the Soviet general staff for communications, a Yeltsin supporter, now appointed to lead the resistance. However, Bardin had no idea who Kobets was, and it was the first and last time Bardin heard of Kobets during the three days of the putsch attempt. This second envoy also brought with him some copies of Yeltsin’s statements and asked Bardin to distribute them through the Relcom channels. Advertisement The internet connection to cities outside of Moscow and beyond the borders of the Soviet Union proved extremely important, circulating proclamations from Yeltsin and other democrats around the world. The main channel was a user group, talk.politics.soviet, available on UseNet, one of the first worldwide collections of internet newsgroups built on many different servers, and thus not reliant on just one. It was full of angry and worried messages posted by Westerners. From Moscow, at around 5 p.m. on Aug. 19, Vadim Antonov, the bespectacled 26-year-old senior programmer who had helped Relcom find a name, posted a message: “I’ve seen the tanks with my own eyes. I hope we’ll be able to communicate during the next few days. Communists cannot rape Mother Russia once again!” Westerners sent messages of support to Yeltsin, and by that night in Moscow, or midday in the United States, American support was surging onto the network as more participants from the United States took part. The network soon became overloaded, causing the connection to drop momentarily. Alexey Soldatov, worried and obsessed, was hanging on the phone with Bardin and kept demanding he must d

The Finance 202: Wall Street and Washington have never been further apart - Washington Post: Politics

Thursday, January 4 2018

The Finance 202: Wall Street and Washington have never been further apart - Washington Post: Politics

PowerPost Analysis Analysis Interpretation of the news based on evidence, including data, as well as anticipating how events might unfold based on past events Follow Stories By Tory Newmyer By Tory Newmyer January 5 at 7:49 AM Follow @ToryNewmyer THE TICKER Vincent Pepe, a commodities broker with ICAP Corp., wears a Dow 25,000 hat to work at the New York Stock Exchange on Thursday. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) President Trump wants you to ignore the mess spilling out from behind the White House curtain and focus instead on the surging stock market. Investors on Thursday were happy to oblige, pushing the Dow Jones industrial average past 25,000 as the historic rally extended its run. Amid the ongoing firestorm over Trump’s falling-out with his onetime chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon — along with other bombshells from Michael Wolff’s new inside look at Trump’s administration — the president paused yesterday to cheer the market milestone. See him here, resetting the bar at 30,000: JUST IN: Shortly after the Dow cracked 25K, President Trump said: "So, I guess our new number is 30,000" pic.twitter.com/fRzljkPF7V — CNBC Now (@CNBCnow) January 4, 2018 Here was Trump sounding off on Twitter late Thursday: The Fake News Media barely mentions the fact that the Stock Market just hit another New Record and that business in the U.S. is booming...but the people know! Can you imagine if “O” was president and had these numbers - would be biggest story on earth! Dow now over 25,000. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 5, 2018 And again this morning: Dow goes from 18,589 on November 9, 2016, to 25,075 today, for a new all-time Record. Jumped 1000 points in last 5 weeks, Record fastest 1000 point move in history. This is all about the Make America Great Again agenda! Jobs, Jobs, Jobs. Six trillion dollars in value created! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 5, 2018 The nation’s political and financial capitals have never felt so far apart. Washington is kicking off the new year with a fresh round of Trump-fueled chaos. The president threatened a nuclear strike against North Korea in a Tuesday evening tweet ; issued a statement Wednesday accusing his former campaign manager and chief strategist of having “lost his mind”; and signaled he’s considering bringing libel charges against Wolff on Thursday and demanded the publisher cease and desist further printing of iits distribution. Critics are raising fresh questions about his fitness to serve. On Wall Street, meanwhile, the sky hardly seems the limit. The Wall Street Journal contextualizes the latest record, the fastest 1,000-point gain in the Dow’s history: “The S&P 500’s long-running rally also reached a new landmark Thursday, becoming the greatest bull market in the postwar era. The broad index has more than quadrupled since the bull market began in March 2009, surpassing the tech-fueled rally of the 1990s, according to the research firm Leuthold Group, which excluded dividends from its calculations. The Dow has risen 283% over that same period, according to the WSJ Market Data Group.” Market watchers say that after locking in a massive corporate tax cut that is helping to turbocharge stock prices, there isn’t much news from Washington that can slow the running of the bulls on Wall Street. “I’m more interested in what tomorrow’s employment report will show on the wage front than I am in the tweets coming out of the White House, and the markets feel the same way,” says Ed Yardeni, president of investment advisory firm Yardeni Research. “All the market really cares about is when’s the next recession and what are earnings going to be doing until then,” Yardeni continued. “Right now, the answer seems to be the next recession is still far off and earnings will turn out to be better than they were a year or two ago now that we’ve got some tax cuts. More importantly, the global economy is booming. And the U.S. labor market is very tight but inflation remains very low. That’s a nirvana situation.” Investors weren't so zen last year. On May 17, stocks suffered their worst sell-off in eight months, with the Dow shedding 1.8 percent, as investors absorbed the news that former FBI director James B. Comey had written a memo detailing Trump’s request that he drop an investigation into former national security adviser Michael Flynn. And the market flinched again in August on rumors that Trump's chief economic adviser Gary Cohn was heading for the exits. In both cases, investors feared White House turmoil would derail the administration’s push for fiscal stimulus, primarily from tax cuts. Gary Cohn, Director of the National Economic Council. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post) Passage of the tax package at the end of last year means investors have less to lose from the mess in Washington. “I think the market has, over time, been able to separate the substance from the silliness,” Compass Point’s Isaac Boltansky says. “West Wing squabbles inherently draw D.C.’s attention, but with tax reform finalized, investors are refocusing on fundamentals.” And it’s true that Washington headlines only spooked stocks temporarily, and marginally, last year. Back on Oct. 23, the rally broke another record it has continued to extend since: The S&P 500's longest streak without a 3 percent selloff. Now, investors appear hardier than ever. That prospect could soon be tested, as Cohn looks primed to leave in the near future and the Russia probe — still just a germ when the fact of the Comey memo surfaced in May — draws ever closer to Trump and his top lieutenants. Trump's trade policy poses a potentially graver and more immediate risk. "We don’t know how the NAFTA negotiations are going to land,” Mark Luschini, chief investment strategist at Janney Montgomery Scott, notes, pointing in addition to the possibility of a tit-for-tat trade fight with China. It's arguably the market's last hangup with Trump's leadership. “We’re all obsessed with Trump. We want to see the world through Trump,” Ruchir Sharma, chief global strategist at Morgan Stanley Investment Management in New York, tells The Post's David J. Lynch . “But the effect that politics has on economics is a bit limited because of the very strong institutional structures in the United States, in contrast to the emerging markets . . . where you have to pay more attention to the political noise.” You are reading The Finance 202, our must-read tipsheet on where Wall Street meets Washington. Not a regular subscriber? MARKET MOVERS A trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. (Michael Nagle/Bloomberg) — Thank Boeing. The Post's Allan Sloan : "If you want to know why the Dow soared above 25,000, I’ll give you a one-word answer: Boeing. The aircraft maker is by far the single largest reason that the Dow Jones industrial average, to give the oh-so-popular market indicator its full name, is flying high. Through Dec. 22, Boeing stock was up 95 percent for the year, adding 960 points to the Dow, according to information I got from Howard Silverblatt, senior industry analyst for S&P-Dow Jones Indices. Boeing’s boost to the Dow’s takeoff was more than double that of the second-biggest contributor, Caterpillar, which accounted for 434 points." — When will it end? NYT's James B. Stewart : "It’s probably no surprise that Burton G. Malkiel, the renowned emeritus professor of e

Tamil Nadu Government staff, teachers demand Pongal bonus

Sunday, January 7 2018

Tamil Nadu Government staff, teachers demand Pongal bonus

Home » Tamil Nadu » You are reading » Tamil Nadu Government staff, teachers demand Pongal bonus Tamil Nadu Government staff, teachers demand Pongal bonus Want new pension scheme to go Members of the Joint Action Committee of Tamil Nadu Teachers Organisations and Government Employees Organisations (Jactto-Geo) staged a demonstration to put forward their demands to the State government on Saturday. They are demanding a month’s salary as bonus and scrapping of the Contributory Pension Scheme (CPS). According to S.N. Janardhanan, State executive committee member of Jacttp-Geo, among their main demands was scrapping of CPS and implementation of the Old Pension Scheme. Arrears demanded “The government is yet to pay the arrears of the VII pay commission for 21 months for employees. We want the arrears to be paid immediately. Usually, the government announces bonus for Pongal on January 1 or 2 but no announcement has been made till now. We want a month’s salary to be granted as bonus,” he said. Similarly, pay anomalies in the VII Pay Commission recommendations should be rectified. “All those working on part-time basis, consolidate pay, honorarium and fixed pay should be brought under regular time-scale pay,” he said. The members are demanding that disciplinary action against employees, who had protested, should be withdrawn. Their other main demands were a minimum pension of Rs.9,000 and wage revision for college and university professors. http://www.stategovernmentnews.in/tamil-nadu-government-staff-teachers-demand-pongal-bonus/ 2018-01-07T16:31:10+00:00 admin Tamil Nadu 7th pay commission,Pongal bonus,Tamil Nadu Government staff,TAMIL NADU Government teachers,Tamil Nadu State Government Employees,Tamil Nadu State Government News,Tamilnadu Govt Pongal bonus,VII Pay Commission Tamil Nadu Government staff, teachers demand Pongal bonus Want new pension scheme to go Members of the Joint Action Committee of Tamil Nadu Teachers Organisations and Government Employees Organisations (Jactto-Geo) staged a demonstration to put forward their demands to the State government on Saturday. They are demanding a month’s salary as bonus...

Boris makes headlines – but these overlooked ministers truly endanger the Tories

Monday, January 8 2018

Boris makes headlines – but these overlooked ministers truly endanger the Tories

Boris makes headlines – but these overlooked ministers truly endanger the Tories The haplessness of Chris Grayling, a member of the cabinet since 2012, goes largely unnoticed. Sign up to the Staggers Morning Call email * Print HTML According to Soccernomics – Simon Kuper and Stefan Szymanski’s book on the use of data in football – talent scouts are more likely to recommend blond players than anyone else. Not because they’re better, but simply because they stand out on the pitch and linger in the memory as a result. Does ministerial incompetence follow a similar pattern? The many howlers of Boris Johnson stand out because of his outsized media profile and distinctive blond mop. The haplessness of Chris Grayling, a member of the cabinet since 2012, goes largely unnoticed and unreported, perhaps because he has hardly any public profile and even less hair. Instead, he has cultivated a kind of inconspicuous incompetence. The year he left the Ministry of Justice in 2015, all youth offenders’ centres but one were found to be unsafe. He was shuffled to Leader of the Commons, traditionally regarded as the antechamber between full cabinet rank and the wilderness, then rescued from the scrapheap by Theresa May, who promoted him to Transport Secretary. Transport policy moves at a glacial place and it may be many years before the repercussions of Grayling’s tenure are properly felt. One civil servant describes him as a “placebo-effect minister”: a secretary of state who has little effect on the inner workings of his department and meagre ability to defend his patch from the fiscal constraints imposed by the Treasury. As a cabinet minister, Grayling has been unable to advance his successive departments’ interests in Whitehall or in cabinet. He was an early supporter of May, whose leadership campaign he ran, as well as one of the six Cameron-era cabinet ministers to back a Leave vote. This means that he is safe in the cabinet for the foreseeable future. It is his predecessor at transport, the party chairman Patrick McLoughlin, whose job is most at risk. McLoughlin has achieved something that has eluded every Conservative politician since the Brexit vote: he has united most of his party’s MPs. Unfortunately, he has united them in a belief he should be sacked. Tory backbenchers blame him for the disastrous general election and for the calamitous party conference that followed. At a bad-tempered reception for failed candidates and defeated Conservative MPs, one of their number asked McLoughlin: “I’ve lost my job. Why should you keep yours?” However, when you ask Conservative MPs to lay out the precise charges against McLoughlin, the list is thin. The case for sacking him is that he is nearly 60 and values loyalty highly, which means that he is unlikely to become a difficult backbencher in the way sacked ministers often do. That said, McLoughlin did cost the Conservatives seats in 2017: it’s just the damage was done while he was at Transport, and it was a result of his success there. During McLoughlin’s tenure from 2012-2016, transport spending was used to ease the pain of austerity and keep voters in the Conservative fold. The result was a significant improvement in the condition of England’s rail and road networks: provided that you lived in the Tory-voting south. McLoughlin’s unnoticed success in improving commuter routes into London collided headfirst with a record of failure at the Department for Communities and Local Government. A series of housing ministers came and went in the Cameron era, all with the same private diagnosis of the problem: our restrictive planning laws are a conspiracy of the homeowning classes against the rest. Each, in turn, was frustrated by the need, real or perceived, to keep older Tory voters on side. The result? The number of homeowners aged under 45 has dropped by 904,000 since the Conservatives came to power in 2010. That brings with it a decline in the number of people who are inclined to vote Conservative. In 2017, the Tories led Labour by 22 points among homeowners, but trailed by 17 points among renters. To make matters worse, the section of the homeowning population that tends to vote Labour despite its economic interests – relatively affluent social liberals – is being priced out of its traditional enclaves in England’s great cities. Expensive housing plus solid commuter rail and road links mean these voters are spreading across the south of England. The most eye-catching consequence is the slew of Labour gains in places such as Reading East and Brighton Kemptown on 8 June. A less reported trend is the drip-drip of historic gains by the opposition in council by-elections since then. This suggests that the Tory losses of 2017 were part of a trend: more liberal, culturally-inclined Labour voters are leaving the inner cities and taking their voting habits with them. Conservative MPs from marginal seats are all too aware of the depth of the housing crisis, in part because even an MP’s salary is not sufficient to get on the housing ladder in parts of the South. Communities Secretary Sajid Javid, the latest minister to grapple with the housing crisis, is making the right noises about the problem, and Chancellor Philip Hammond is under pressure to address it in his Budget. But more – and therefore cheaper – houses in southern England are only part of the answer. Improving transport links within the north and Midlands must be prioritised, too. If young graduates can commute easily to work near their families, they won’t have to move in such large numbers to the capital. To change that would require more than a placebo-effect minister. So far, Grayling has not even managed to accomplish the electrification of key rail lines in the north, or increase connections in Wales. The political repercussions of McLoughlin were bad enough for the Tories. But the political consequences of Grayling may be more long-lasting.

Watch: How Europe is greener now than 100 years ago - The Washington Post

Monday, January 8 2018

Watch: How Europe is greener now than 100 years ago - The Washington Post

By Rick Noack By Rick Noack December 4, 2014 Follow @rick_n Within the last 100 years, Europe has experienced two World Wars, the end of communism, the emergence of the European Union and a series of other transformative political and economic developments. A team of scientists has now been able to visualize the impact of historical events in maps that show the growth and decline of settlements, forests and croplands. The map, shown above, is the result of a research project led by Dutch scholar Richard Fuchs from the University of Wageningen. Besides regional political and economic trends, Europe's landscape was shaped by several larger developments of the 20th century, according to Fuchs. The following maps preview some of the affected regions which we will explain and show in detail throughout this post. "More than 100 years ago, timber was used for almost everything: as fuel wood, for metal production, furniture, house construction. Hence, at around 1900 there was hardly any forest areas left in Europe. Especially after World War II, many countries started massive afforestation programs which are still running today," Fuchs told The Washington Post. As a result, Europe's forests grew by a third over the last 100 years. At the same time, cropland decreased due to technological innovations such as motorization, better drainage and irrigation systems: Relatively fewer area was needed to produce the same amount of food. Furthermore, many people migrated from rural to urban areas, or overseas. Fuchs' fascinating conclusion: Forests and settlements grew at the same time and Europe is a much greener continent today than it was 100 years ago. A closer look at different regions and countries reveals Europe's recovery from the deforestation of past centuries. In France, Spain and Italy, reforestation was particularly visible In the southern French region of Vaucluse, entire mountain ranges were de-forested at the beginning of the 20th century, but the country invested heavily to reverse the trend. Meanwhile, agricultural projects in southern Spain transformed once arid, barren areas into profitable agricultural fields or even forests. A similar development was documented in Italy. Former cropland were abandoned due to market competition, urbanization and emigration. Today, many parts of the Apennine Mountains (located on the right side of the map below) are dominated by grasslands and forests again. The end of communism also led to forest growth in eastern Europe In eastern Europe, many forests re-grew after the end of the Soviet Union. Fuchs and his colleagues explain the development with the fact that many privatized agricultural farms were less competitive on the global market. Therefore, farmers abandoned unprofitable cropland. Particularly in Romania and Poland, former cropland was taken back by nature afterward, first turning into grassland and later into forests. In the 1990s, Europe also introduced a Common Agricultural Policy which stated that only highly productive areas should be used as cropland, in order to prevent inefficiency. Hence, fields got continuously bigger to better manage and maintain them with machines. Marginal land, however, was given up. Scandinavian forests recovered to supply other countries To the north of formerly communist Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, Scandinavian countries were able to re-grow most of their forests (and are continuing to do so today) to keep up with timer demand, as they substituted most other suppliers in Europe that had practically used up most of their own wood resources. Elsewhere, re-forestation programs soon had a visible impact, as well... ... as more and more people moved into urban areas What you see here is among of the most populous areas of Europe: London (the growing, red area in the upper part of the picture), Paris (lower left side), and Brussels (in the middle). Although London experienced its most significant population growth in the 19th century, the city's suburbs grew massively in the 20th century and continue to do so. The city of Paris itself actually lost inhabitants over the 20th century due to gentrification and higher rents, but you can clearly see how its suburbs became more and more populous throughout the century. Britain recovered from excessive timber demand, as the Netherlands expanded its forests Both the Netherlands and Britain had empires that relied heavily on the sea and their naval strength. In order to build ships, they needed wood -- and in 1900, only 2 - 3 percent of their territory was still covered with forests. Both countries have since been able to increase their forest area to 10-12 percent, as data from 2010 shows. The Netherlands also pursued another major project, visible on maps: It reclaimed the Zuiderzee bay with dams and drainage systems to gain more land. A closer look at England and Ireland shows that both countries are nevertheless still mainly covered with grassland, while re-forestation has been particularly successful in Scotland. Lazaro Gamio contributed to this post. Close

Eurozone unemployment falls to near 9-year low - Washington Post: World

Monday, January 8 2018

Eurozone unemployment falls to near 9-year low - Washington Post: World

Europe Eurozone unemployment falls to near 9-year low French President Emmanuel Macron, right, and French Foreign Affairs Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian attend a meeting at the start-up incubator Soho3Q, in Beijing, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. (Charles Platiau/Pool Photo via AP) (Associated Press) By Pan Pylas | AP By Pan Pylas | AP January 9 at 6:17 AM LONDON — Unemployment across the 19-country eurozone fell in November to its lowest level in nearly nine years, official figures showed Tuesday, in the latest sign that the currency bloc’s economy picked up further momentum at the end of 2017. Eurostat, the European Union’s statistics agency, said the jobless rate adjusted for seasonal factors fell to 8.7 percent in November from 8.8 percent the previous month. That’s the lowest rate since January 2009, when the eurozone was reeling from a deep recession following the global financial crisis. The agency said the number of unemployed fell by 107,000 during the month, taking the total down to 14.26 million. Unemployment across the region has been falling steadily over the past year as the eurozone recovery has gathered steam — figures later this month are expected to show that economic growth picked up in the fourth quarter, possibly to an impressive 0.8 percent. Though the unemployment rate has been on a downward trend in the eurozone, it remains more than double the U.S. rate of 4.1 percent. That’s largely due to the fact that the recovery since the Great Recession has been far slower in the eurozone because the region also endured a debt crisis that led to many countries, notably Greece, enacting huge budget cuts. The legacy of the debt crisis endures in the divergent unemployment rates across the bloc. Many countries, such as Germany, are enjoying low unemployment rates below 5 percent, while those who were at the forefront of the debt crisis still have double-digit rates of unemployment. Still, even there, there are signs of improvement. Spain’s jobless rate, which in recent years stood at around 25 percent, is now down to 16.7 percent, while Greece’s has been steadily falling, though still high just above 20 percent. The hope among policymakers across the region is that the decline in unemployment will start to lift wages and boost spending, making the recovery self-sustaining and normalizing the eurozone economy following years of crisis. So far, there’s been little evidence that the steady fall in unemployment is doing much to lift average pay rises in the eurozone. However, there are signs from company surveys that falling unemployment could soon start to work its way through into higher wages, which should help inflation get to the European Central Bank’s target rate of just below 2 percent — inflation has been stubbornly below target for years and currently stands at 1.4 percent. How quickly wages pick up is likely to determine when the ECB ends its massive bond-buying stimulus program, which is currently set to last at least through September. “With the percentage of companies mentioning the scarcity of labor as a factor limiting production now at the highest level since the start of the monetary union (in 1999), wage growth should start to pick up,” said Peter Vanden Houte, an economist at ING. Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Close

Monday, January 15 2018

Tamilnadu State Government approved 7th Pay Commission Pay For TN Employees – Press Release

Home » Tamil Nadu » You are reading » approved 7th Pay Commission Pay For TN Employees – Press Release admin January 15, 2018 approved 7th Pay Commission Pay For TN Employees – Press Release 2018-01-15T11:57:47+00:00 Tamil Nadu No Comment approved 7th Pay Commission Pay For TN Employees – Press Release 7th Pay Commission Pay Approved for Employees and Teachers – Press Release issued by says that increase of 2.57 times from the present pay granted at par with Central Government Employees in its press release no: 678 dated 11.10.2017 has stated that based on 7th Pay Commission Committee was constituted by Govt to examine 7th Pay Commission Pay and Allowances granted to Central Government and recommend the pay and allowances that can be implemented to Employees. Now, the recommendations of the said Committee is fully accepted by the Govt. The salient features of decision taken by Govt for granting 7th Pay Commission Pay and allowances are as follows. 1. Pay band and grade pay structure have been removed and replaed with Pay Matrix. 2. All existing employees would get an increase of 2.57 times in their basic Pay received as on 1st January 2016 3. Minimum pay has been incresed from Rs. 6100 to Rs. 15,700 and Maximum pay has been increased to Rs. 2,25,000. approved-7th-pay-commission-pay-tn-employees-press-release/ 2018-01-15T11:57:25+00:00 admin Tamil Nadu 7th CPC Tamil Nadu govt employees,7th pay commission,7th pay commission latest news, Employees approved 7th Pay Commission Pay For TN Employees - Press Release 7th Pay Commission Pay Approved for Employees and Teachers - Press Release issued by says that increase of 2.57 times from the present pay granted at par with Central Government...

Monday, January 15 2018

Tamilnadu State Government Holidays List 2018 – Government of Tamilnadu G.O. Ms. No.937 dated the 7th November 2017

*Applicable only to Commercial Banks and Co-operative Banks in Tamil Nadu holidays-list-2018-government-tamilnadu-g-o-ms-no-937-dated-7th-november-2017/ 2018-01-15T12:03:08+00:00 admin Tamil Nadu Holidays List 2018,TamilNadu State government, News Holidays List 2018 - Government of Tamilnadu G.O. Ms. No.937 dated the 7th November 2017 Holidays List 2018 - TN Govt GO dated 07.11.2017. SI.No Public Holidays Date Day 1. New Year’s Day 01.01.2018 Monday 2. Pongal 14.01.2018 Sunday 3. Thiruvalluvar Day 15.01.2018 Monday 4. Uzhavar Thirunal 16.01.2018 Tuesday 5. Republic Day 26.01.2018 Friday 6. Telugu New Year’s Day 18.03.2018 Sunday 7. Mahaveer Jayanthi 29.03.2018 Thursday 8. Good Friday 30.03.2018 Friday 9. * Annual closing of Accountsfor Commercial Banks & Co-operative Banks 01.04.2018 Sunday 10. Tamil New Year’s Day...

Friday, January 12 2018

Goa State Government – Order – Skill development & entrepreneurship

Date:04 January. 2018 ORDER Approval of the Governnrcnt is hereby conveyed for transfer of plots/land currently in possession of Directorate of Skill Development and Entreprencurship, Government of Goa bcaring Survey No. l28, Sub Division No. 1, admeasuring area of 4073 sq. mts. and bearing. Survey No.172. Sub Division No. 0. admeasuring area of 8382 sq. mts. situated in village Porvorim in Bardez Taluka, North Goa District to Departtrent of Information technology, Government of Goa for purpose of creatirg Start-Up related ecosystem in Goa. This is issued with the concurrence of Finance (Exp) Department, issued vide U.O. No.1400044698 dated 28/11/2017 and approval of cabinet vide decision taken on the items in the XXIVth Cabinet Meeting of the Council of Ministers held on 28/12/2017 as conveyed by GAD vide theiir letter no. 1/150/2017-GAD-11 dated 29/12/2017 By Order and in the name of the Governor of Goa Dircctor of Skill Devclopment and Entrepreneurship&.

Thursday, January 11 2018

Kerala Government Order : Pay Revision 2014 – Chemical Examiner’s Laboratory – Risk allowance Erratum – Orders Issued

Order : Pay Revision 2014 – Chemical Examiner’s Laboratory – Risk allowance Erratum – Orders Issued Kerala Government Order : Pay Revision 2014 – Chemical Examiner’s Laboratory – Risk allowance Erratum Pay Revision 2014 – Chemical Examiner’s Laboratory – Risk allowance Erratum – Orders Issued. FINANCE(ANOMALY (Ms)No.2/20 18/ (91)/Fin 1.G.O.(P)No.7/2016/Fin dated 20.01.2016 2.G.O(Ms)No.210/2017/(49)/Fin dated 28.03.17 above, Government have issued orders revising Pay and Allowances of State Government Employees and Teachers w.e.f. 01.07.2014. As per the Government order read as 2nd above, Government have issued orders sanctioning risk allowance to various categories of employees in Chemical Examiner’s Laboratory at the rates specified therein. It has come to the notice of Government that certain errors have crept in the designations of employees included in the schedule of Risk Allowance ordered vide Government Order read as 2nd above in comparison to the designation included in the schedule of Chemical Examiner’s Laboratories Department in the 101h Pay Revision Order. 2.Governmeflt have examined order that the posts of Junior Chemical Examiner and Joint Scientific Examiner included in the Schedule of Risk Allowance (Annexure X) will be corrected as Joint Chemical Examiner and Junior Scientific Officer respectively. BY ORDER OF THE GOVERNC’Ft G.ASOK KUMAR

Thursday, January 11 2018

Kerala Government – Pay Revision 2014 – Notional Fixation of Pay to Higher Secondary School Principals in the Department of Higher Secondary Education on completion of 15 Years of Service in the post of Higher Secondary School Teacher – Sanctioned – Orders

– Pay Revision 2014 – Notional Fixation of Pay to Higher Secondary School Principals in the Department of Higher Secondary Education on completion of 15 Years of Service in the post of Higher Secondary School Teacher – Sanctioned – Orders Issued Kerala Government – Pay Revision 2014 – Notional Fixation of Pay to Higher Secondary School Principals in the Department of Higher Secondary Education on completion of 15 Years of Service in the post of Higher Secondary School Teacher – Sanctioned Abstract Pay Revision 2014 – Notional Fixation of Pay to Higher Secondary School Principals in the Department of Higher Secondary Education on completion of 15 Years of Service in the post of Higher Secondary School Teacher – Sanctioned – Orders Issued. FINANCE (ANOMALY (P) No. 1/2018/(92)/Fin 1.G.O.(P)No.522/2012/(1 13)/Fin dated 28.09.2012. 2.G.O(P)No.7/2016/Fin dated 20.01.2016. 1 paper above, notional Time Bound Higher Grade fixation as per Rule 28 A Part I KSRs was granted to Principals of Higher Secondary Education on the due date of completion of 8 years of service as Higher Secondary School Teacher and thereafter their pay was fixed in the Principal’s scale on the same date and monetary benefit on that account was granted only w.e.f 01.02.2011. The above order was issued to rectify the junior senior anomaly in the case of Higher Secondary School Teachers who got promotion as Principal before getting first Time Bound Higher Grade promotion. Now it has come to the notice of the Government that the above anomaly will be recurred in the case of Higher Secondary School Teacher who got promotion to the post of Principal before getting 15 years 2nd Time Bound Higher Grade on completion of 15 years of service. 2. Government have examined grant notional Time Bound Higher Grade fixation to Principals of Higher Secondary Education as per Rule 28 A Part I KSRs on the due dates on completion of 15 years of service as Higher Secondary School Teacher and there after their pay will be fixed in the Principal’s scale on the same date. In the case of an officer, who completed 15 years of service prior to 01.02.16, monetary benefit will be admissible only w.e.f 01.02.2016. BY ORDER OF THE GOVERNOR G.ASOK KUMAR