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Wednesday, January 17 2018

Government of Tripura: Allocation of Revenue (including Relief Rehabilitation & Disaster Management)

Home » Tripura » You are reading » Government of Tripura: Allocation of Revenue (including Relief Rehabilitation & Disaster Management) Government of Tripura: Allocation of Revenue (including Relief Rehabilitation & Disaster Management) GOVERNMENT OF TRIPURA GENERAL ADMINISTRATION (PERSONEL & TRAINING) DEPARTMENT No.F.6(2)-GA(P&T)/99: Dated, Agartala, the 11th January, 2018. NOTIFICATION In the interest of public service, the Governor is pleased to order as follows with immediate effect and until further orders : i) Allocation of Revenue (including Relief Rehabilitation & Disaster Management) Department to Shri Yatendra Kumar, lAS, Secretary to the Govt. of Tripura vide SI. No. (ii) of this Department Notification of even number dated 10th January, 2018 s hereby cancelled. He will continue to hold the charges of Food, Civ Supplies & Consumer Affairs and Agriculture Departments. ii) Shri Manoj Kumar, IAS, Principle Secretary, Govt. of Tripura, Urban Development, Tourism and Power Departments will also hold the charge of Revenue (including Relief RE abilitation & Disaster Management) Department, in addition. He is relieved from the charge of Tourism Department iii) Shri Manik Lal Dey, IAS, Secretary / Govt. of Tripura, Animal Resources Development, Information & Cultu al Affairs, Minorities Welfare and OBC Welfare Departments will also hole the charge of Tourism Department, in addition. By order of the Governor, ( R. P. Datta) Additional Secretary to the Government of Tripura. Copy to :- 1. Secretary to the Governor, Tripura, Rajbhavan, A.gartala. 2. Principal Secretary to the Chief Minister, Tripun , Agartala . 3. Offices of all Ministers, Tripura , Agartala. 4. All Principal Secretaries / Secretaries / Special ecretaries, Tripura, Agartala . 5. PPS to the Chief Secretary, Tripura , Agartala. 6. Accountant General (A &E) / (Audit, Report Sec ion), Tripura , Agartala . 7. Finance (Estt. Br.) / GA (SA) / GA (C&C) / GA(I R) / Home / Revenue Deptt. , Agartala. 8. Director, Land Records & Settlement / RR & Di ~ aster ManagemenWigilance, Agartala. 9. Director, IT, Indranagar, Agartala with request t( upload the same in the State Portal. 10. Treasury Officer, Agartala Treasury No.1 & II , West Tripura. 11 . Confidential Section, 0/0. the Chief Secretary,Tripura. 12. Manager, Govt. Press, Agartala for publication. 13. Shri Sushil Kumar, lAS, Principal Secretary, Govt. of Tripura. 14. Dr. Rakesh Sarwal, lAS, Principal Secretary, Govt. of Tripura. 15. Shri Manoj Kumar, lAS, Principal Secretary, Govt. of Tripura . 16. Shri Yatendra Kumar, lAS, Secretary, Govt. of Tripura. 17. Shri Manik Lal Dey, lAS, Secretary, Govt. of Tirpura . 18.Personal files / Guard file.

Wednesday, January 17 2018

Filling up the post of stenographer Grade-I, on deputation in Goa Human Rights Commission

Home » Goa » You are reading » Filling up the post of stenographer Grade-I, on deputation in Goa Human Rights Commission Filling up the post of stenographer Grade-I, on deputation in Goa Human Rights Commission CIRCULAR Dated: 02/01/2018. Sub: Filling up the post of stenographer Grade-I, on deputation in Goa Human Rights Commission It has been decided to fill up one post of Stenographer Grade-I, in the pay Scale Rs.9300-34800-4200, by transfer on deputation initially for a period of one year in Goa Human Rights commission. stenographer Grade-I/stenographer Grade-II with minimum two years and 5 years of regular service respectively may apply for the post. The services of the incumbent on deputation shall be regulated as per the standard terms and conditions on deputation contained in Government of Goa, Department of Personnel, O.M. No.13/4/74-PER dated 20/11/2013, as amended from time to time. It is, therefore, requested to circulate the vacancy amongst eligible Stenographers of your Department and forward the application of willing candidates duly recommended and firm commitment to relieve him/her, in case selected by the Goa Human Rights Commission, along with vigilance clearance certificate and photocopies of their A.C.Rs for the preceding two years on or before 22/02/2018 to this office for selection. (Shashikant C. Bhamaikar)

Wednesday, January 17 2018

Out of time: The fragile temporality of Carillion’s accumulation model | SPERI

17 January 2018 Out of time: The fragile temporality of Carillion’s accumulation model Carillion is the epitome of the modern financialized firm and its liquidation tells us much about risk in this phase of financialization Adam Leaver, Professor in Accounting and Society, Sheffield University Management School Look anywhere on Carillion’s website and we see metaphors for its supposed tangibility and strength, from the way it advertises its Tarmac Group heritage to its list of construction achievements which in fact precede its inception . The website projects an image of a company steeped in all things concrete and solid. However, as Carillion moves into liquidation it is evident it was anything but. By 2016 Carillion’s tangible fixed assets were just 3.3% and stocks 1.8% of its total assets. Much of its balance sheet was instead made up of intangibles (37.7% of total assets), of which almost all was goodwill (35.5% of total assets) (Figure 1). The value of that goodwill depended on Carillion continuing as a going concern, which is not now an option. Creditors now want their money back, but Carillion do not have assets which can be sold to make them whole. Carillion is the very epitome of the modern financialized firm and its liquidation tells us much about risk in this phase of financialization. The Carillion financialization story is not one of distributional struggles between stakeholders in linear time, where dividends and share buybacks come at the expense of either wages, employment or investment in a zero-sum way. Employment and average labour costs actually rose between 2012 and 2016. Carillion’s financialization story is about how firms manipulate their balance sheet to intervene in the temporalities of income and obligation; and how this may create unanticipated inter-temporal tensions. This view of financialization owes more to critical accounting than political economy. Critical accountants such as Hines (1988); Hopwood (1986); McSweeney (2000); Morgan (1988); Robson (1982, 1984) have long argued that accounting is a process which constitutes financial reality by inscribing a particular temporality or temporalities. Processes like discounting or depreciation are future-oriented and require the inscription of particular time periods. The assessment of goodwill under International Financial Reporting Standards rules are a case in point. At one level, goodwill is simply the difference between the market value and book value of a firm recorded at the point of acquisition. But this difference in price is supposed to reflect both an assumption about the future income streams likely to accrue to the holder of the underlying assets and the future discount rate to acknowledge the many factors that could affect the future-present value of that income (such as the future costs of capital). When a future emerges that looks very different to that inscribed in the balance sheet, whether through unanticipated risks, a cost of capital increase, or a change to cashflow assumptions, it is expected that those goodwill assets are impaired in the accounts. Goodwill therefore no longer needs to be amortised (gradually expensed) on an annual basis and is instead subject to periodic impairment assessments. Goodwill therefore forms a larger part of large firm assets on average than they did before the accounting change. Many firms have levered up against that larger asset base; Carillion is not unique in that regard. But levering up against your goodwill is a dangerous inter-temporal gamble. If goodwill is supposed to capture the present value of discounted future cashflows of underlying assets, debt is a claim on the future cashflows of the firm (its liability identity), but also allows firms to bring cash forward into the present (its asset identity) which can then be put to use for a number of purposes. The difficult temporal balancing act for a firm is to make sure that the present costs of its future liabilities can be met from the income generated by its underlying assets. And this is where firms like Carillion come unstuck. It over-estimated the future income generating capacity of its assets (contracts) and this encouraged it to do a number of silly things to keep things going for the stock market and senior management. First, Carillion borrowed against its assets (intangible or otherwise) and paid out dividends to placate shareholders and trigger board bonuses: for the period 2012-2016 Carillion paid out £394m in dividends . Although it will not have been audited as such, this looks a lot like a firm paying dividends out of debt – aping the dividend recap practices of the private equity sector. In 2016 for example it paid out more cash in dividends (£78.9m) than it received in net cash flows from operating activities (£73.3m). This ultimately eroded shareholder funds as a percentage of total liabilities, which fell from 26.2% in 2012 to 16.5% in 2016. Second Carillion took on more short-term liabilities, leading to problems of maturity mismatch. Current liabilities to total liabilities (including shareholder funds) rose from 43.8% in 2012 to 50% in 2016 (Figure 2) – although some of this is accountable for by the erosion of shareholder funds. Third, despite being faced with underperforming contracts, Carillion did not impair its goodwill, but instead tried to grow its way out of a crisis by bidding for more and more new contracts to generate income to pay next year’s creditors, who had lent on an increasingly short-term basis. This sounds suspiciously like a lawful Ponzi scheme , as Matthew Vincent points out. If Robert Peston’s conversation with a cabinet minister are also to be believed, Whitehall officials gave Carillion over £1bn of contracts knowing their financial position was precarious, effectively making taxpayers a kind of Ponzi scheme investor of last resort. With the NHS under serious financial pressure, this largesse towards a company whose chairman is a Tory party advisor and donor is surely a scandal in waiting. The push to win contracts to pay back its short term creditors led to top line growth but margin collapse. Their Earnings Before Interest and Taxes (EBIT) margin fell from 5.34% to 4.09% between 2012 and 2016. The recent failure of a number of PFI contracts was the perfect storm and the firm went under. There are so many lessons to take from the Carillion debacle. For financialization scholars it tells us about the modern financialized firm: the prevailing emphasis on present-ist distributional struggles between workers or investment and shareholders misses the point that these are not zero-sum trade-offs when companies borrow to finance investment or distributions. A more central financialized tendency is for firms to manipulate their balance sheets to play with the temporalities of income and obligation. The primary tension that arises is one between claims made today and those who wish to claim tomorrow; between distributions in the present and the claims of pension fund beneficiaries in the future. Or to put it another way: the firm is a portal (moving income through space and time), collateralised by an activity, working for elite advantage. That advantage includes abusing limited liability privileges to use the firm as a repository for ri

Hezbollah accuses Israel of Sidon bombing - The Jerusalem Post

Friday, January 19 2018

Hezbollah accuses Israel of Sidon bombing - The Jerusalem Post

Hezbollah accuses Israel of Sidon bombing > By REUTERS January 19, 2018 17:52 "The bomb that targeted a Hamas member in Sidon is a dangerous beginning and it is not possible to be silent about it." 1 minute read. Share on facebook Share on twitter Lebanese policemen are seen next to a damaged car in Sidon, southern Lebanon. (REUTERS/Ali Hashisho). (photo credit: REUTERS/ALI HASHISHO) BEIRUT - The leader of Lebanon's Hezbollah on Friday accused Israel of a bomb attack that wounded a member of the Palestinian group Hamas in the Lebanese city of Sidon, calling it an act of aggression.The Israeli military said it does not comment on foreign reports. The bomb blast injured the Hamas member on Sunday , destroying his car as he was about to get in."The bomb that targeted a Hamas member in Sidon is a dangerous beginning and it is not possible to be silent about it," said Nasrallah, leader of the Iran-backed Shi'ite Hezbollah.In a televised address, he said "all indications" pointed to Israel.The target, Mohamed Hamdan, was not a publicly known Hamas figure in Lebanon. A statement from Hamas, the Islamist group that controls Gaza, confirmed he was a member of the group, without detailing his role.Al-Manar television, run by the Lebanese political and military group Hezbollah, described Hamdan as an important figure in Hamas, adding that he appeared to have a security role and was being tracked by Israel.A leader of the Palestinian Fatah movement in Lebanon said Hamdan was involved in operations in Israel. "The incident has Israeli fingerprints," Mounir al-Maqdah, the Fatah official, told Reuters.Israeli Intelligence Minister Israel Katz had told Army Radio earlier this week that "if Israel had been involved, it would not have ended with a lightly wounded." Share on facebook

Sunday, January 21 2018

Maharashtra State government employees to participate in run

Home » Maharashtra » You are reading » Maharashtra State to participate in run Maharashtra State to participate in run 2018-01-21T17:00:58+00:00 Maharashtra No Comment Maharashtra State to participate in run More than 150 government officers and employees will participate in the marathon on Sunday to spread the social message of “no honking”. Urban development department’s (UDD) principal secretary Nitin Karir, water resources department’s principal secretary I.S. Chahal and several other will be participating in the marathon. A group of 10 have been taking part in various marathons for a few years. “We practice every day at Mahalakshmi racecourse. We have been taking part in the marathon and various similar competitions for a long time. We are going to run the full marathon this time,” Sanjay Ingle, deputy secretary of industries department said. This will be his second full marathon. Around 15 to 20 officials will be participating in half marathon this year. More than 100 will be taking part in the dream run. “The officials will be carrying a message of no honking during the marathon in the backdrop of growing noise pollution in the state and especially in cities. The transport department has supported the campaign of no honking. This is to bring public awareness among the citizens,” Mr Ingle said. http://www.stategovernmentnews.in/maharashtra-state-government-employees-participate-run/ 2018-01-21T17:00:25+00:00 admin Maharashtra Maharashtra State Government Employees,Maharashtra state government news Maharashtra State to participate in run More than 150 government officers and employees will participate in the marathon on Sunday to spread the social message of “no honking”. Urban development department's (UDD) principal secretary Nitin Karir, water resources department's principal secretary I.S. Chahal and several other ...

Sunday, January 21 2018

Bihar government’s human chain against dowry system and child marriage a ‘super flop’: Opposition

Home » Bihar » You are reading » Bihar government’s human chain against dowry system and child marriage a ‘super flop’: Opposition Bihar government’s human chain against dowry system and child marriage a ‘super flop’: Opposition 2018-01-21T17:03:29+00:00 Bihar No Comment Bihar government’s human chain against dowry system and child marriage a ‘super flop’: Opposition PATNA: Bihar’s two main opposition parties -RJD and Congress – on Sunday said that the state government’s much-trumpeted human chain against dowry system and child marriage turned out to be “super flop” as participation of common people could not be seen anywhere across the state. “Only school children who were called by opening their institutions despite being Sunday, their teachers and a section of state were seen standing in the human chain that remained broken here and there. Common people didn’t turn up anywhere to participate in the chain. Participation of common villagers could not be seen anywhere,” RJD’s state president Ram Chandra Purbey said, adding, “The non-participation of common people shows that CM Nitish Kumar has lost peoples’ faith.” Congress spokesperson and former MLA Harkhu Jha said, unlike previous year’s human chain in favour of liquor ban; this year’s human chain turned out to be a “Government roadshow” as only and school children were seen in the today’s chain. “Participation of common people was very negligible. There was lack of enthusiasm even in the ruling parties’ workers who turned up in very less number,” Jha said. Congress spokesperson said the last year’s human chain in support of prohibition was a grand success mainly because of the participation of RJD and Congress. RJD and Congress, being the part of the grand alliance government, had supported human chain in 2017, but the two parties boycotted the chain this year. “CM Nitish Kumar should have convened an all-party meeting and seek support of RJD and Congress. We are not opposed to the government in its campaign against dowry system and child marriage. Had Nitish Kumar convened an all-party meeting and sought our support, the two parties might have considered,” Jha said. Terming the today’s event as “Apradh chain” (crime chain), RJD spokesperson Mrityunjay Tiwari said the JD(U)-BJP coalition government led by Nitish has failed on all fronts specially on the issue of controlling serious crimes like murder, loot, road robberies and bank dacoities. “The today’s human chain was the state government’s attempt to divert people’s attention from its failures,” Tiwari said. Congress national media panellist Prem Chandra Mishra asked the state government to come out with a white paper on the human chain with details of expenditures. http://www.stategovernmentnews.in/bihar-governments-human-chain-dowry-system-child-marriage-super-flop-opposition/ 2018-01-21T17:03:04+00:00 admin Bihar Bihar Government,Bihar State Government News Bihar government's human chain against dowry system and child marriage a 'super flop': Opposition PATNA: Bihar's two main opposition parties -RJD and Congress - on Sunday said that the state government's much-trumpeted human chain against dowry system and child marriage turned out to be 'super flop' as participation of common...

Uber CEO:

Tuesday, January 23 2018

Uber CEO: "Business is actually surprisingly good" - Axios

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Persuasive proof that America is full of racist and selfish people - Vox

Tuesday, January 23 2018

Persuasive proof that America is full of racist and selfish people - Vox

Persuasive proof that America is full of racist and selfish people What millions of Google searches reveal about our national psyche. Flipboard Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images “Google is a digital truth serum,” Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, author of Everybody Lies , told me in a recent interview. “People tell Google things that they don't tell to possibly anybody else, things they might not tell to family members, friends, anonymous surveys, or doctors.” Stephens-Davidowitz was working on a PhD in economics at Harvard when he became obsessed with Google Trends, a tool that tracks how frequently searches are made in a given area over a given time period. He spent five years combing through this data. The idea was that you could get far better real-time information about what people are thinking by looking at Google Trends data than you could through polls or some other survey device. It turns out he was right. As a barometer of our national consciousness, Google is as accurate (and predictive) as it gets. In 2016, when the Republican primaries were just beginning, most pundits and pollsters did not believe Trump could win. After all, he had insulted veterans, women, minorities, and countless other constituencies. But Stephens-Davidowitz saw clues in his Google research that suggested Trump was far more serious than many supposed. Searches containing racist epithets and jokes were spiking across the country during Trump’s primary run, and not merely in the South but in upstate New York, Western Pennsylvania, Eastern Ohio, rural Illinois, West Virginia, and industrial Michigan. Stephens-Davidowitz saw in the Google Trends data a racially polarized electorate, and one primed to respond to the ethno-nationalist rhetoric of Trump. There were earlier signs, too. On Obama’s 2008election night, Stephens-Davidowitz found that “one in every hundred Google searches that included the word ‘Obama’ also included ‘KKK’” or the n-word. Searches for racist websites like Stormfront also spiked. “There was a darkness and hatred that was hidden from traditional sources,” Stephens-Davidowitz says. “Those searches are hard to reconcile with a society in which racism is a small factor.” Racial attitudes are just one of the many interesting discoveries in Stephens-Davidowitz’s research. He also explores the disconnect between our social media lives and our actual lives, between what we talk about publicly and what we think about privately. I spoke with him about the book and why he thinks Google Trends is "the most important data set ever collected on the human psyche." I also ask him about his most startling finding, which is that America is experiencing a crisis of self-induced abortions in places where access to abortion clinics is sparse. Our lightly edited conversation follows. Sean Illing You refer to Google as a digital truth serum. What does it tell us about ourselves? Seth Stephens-Davidowitz People tell Google things that they don't tell to possibly anybody else, things they might not tell to family members, friends, anonymous surveys, doctors. People feel very comfortable confessing things to Google. In general, Google tells us that people are different than they present themselves. One way they're different, I have to say, is that they’re nastier and meaner than they often present themselves. I've done a lot of research on racism, for example, and I was shocked by how frequently people make racist searches, particularly for jokes mocking African Americans. This concealed ugliness can predict a lot of behaviors, particularly in the political realm. Sean Illing Speaking of politics, you believed way back in early 2016 that Trump was a serious candidate. You were looking at Google search activity, saw a spike in racist and misogynistic searches, and thought that was a sign of things to come. Seth Stephens-Davidowitz Yeah, I did say that I thought Trump was going to win very, very early, but I'm not sure if that was based purely on the data or just because I'm a total pessimist. I always have been fairly pessimistic about this kind of thing. Sean Illing Welcome to the club. Seth Stephens-Davidowitz I'm always predicting horrible things are going to happen, with or without data. But I think there were definitely some clues on the internet that Trump should have been taken more seriously than other people were taking him. Sean Illing What were you seeing exactly? Seth Stephens-Davidowitz The first thing was that the level of racism in this country was a lot higher than I had realized. I think a lot of people thought that Trump would be done as soon as he started saying all these racially charged things. I think when you look at this internet data, you see the demand for this type of material. I mean, I had even been studying white nationalist sites like Stormfront for a long time, long before most people knew about it, and still I was shocked by how widespread the appeal of these sites were. Sean Illing This is what we should’ve been paying attention to, not these outdated polling methods. Seth Stephens-Davidowitz You can't really predict using surveys who's going to turn out in an election because everybody says they're going to vote, nobody wants to admit that they have no intention of voting. But you can predict who's going to vote based on their Google searches. People search how to vote, or where to vote, or polling places weeks before an election and that predicts that turnout will be high. In this election, you saw very, very clearly in the data that there was a huge decrease in these searches in cities with enormous African-American populations, for example. It was very clear in the Google search data that black turnout was going to be way down in 2016, and that was one of the reasons Clinton did so much worse than the polls predicted. Sean Illing The political utility of this data is obvious, but it seems like there’s no limit to what we can learn about ourselves. In the book, you call it "the most important data set ever collected on the human psyche." Seth Stephens-Davidowitz I think the only real competition is Facebook, and I don't think that's as interesting a data set because people are so much less honest on Facebook. People are really, really honest on Google, so they tell Google things that they don't tell anybody else. They search for answers to questions they won’t ask anyone else. I've found this over the past few years: Take any subject area and look at Google searches and you can find something new and interesting and surprising that we didn't know. Whether it's hatred or abortion or child abuse or political views or pregnancy or anxiety or depression. Pretty much every time I turn to Google data, there's something there that is interesting. Sean Illing I guess polls are still useful, but search histories are a much better way to get a sense of what people are thinking about controversial or personal subjects. Seth Stephens-Davidowitz Yeah, and those are the most interesting things. Sean Illing No doubt. Seth Stephens-Davidowitz They are also often the most important. One of the studies I talk about in the book is a study of Islamophobia. It's not really Islamophobia, it's like Islamo-rage, or something like that. It’s essentially people with horrifically violent thoughts toward Muslim Americans. People search things like “kill Muslims” or “I hate Muslims” or “Muslims are evil.” These people are basically maniacs and you can actually see minute-by-minute when these searches rise and when these searches fall. What’s interesting about this is that we’re talking about a relatively small group of maniacs. The average American does not search “kill Muslims” or “I hate Muslims”; it's a small group but it's also an important group because these types of people can create a lot of problems. They are the ones who tend to commit hate crimes or even murder Muslims. That’s what I mean when I say you can get insights on topics that are truly important. Sean Illing Let’s zoom back a bit and get a broader sense of the American psyche as revealed by Google. What do Americans fear the most or worry about the most? Seth Stephens-Davidowitz I'd say that one's own body is a pretty big one. If you look at Google AdWords data on bodily insecurity, people who go around looking for ways to lose weight or improve their body, these are almost as popular among men as among women, which is not usually talked about. Twenty percent of searches looking to change one's breasts are from men looking into how to get rid of man boobs. I think male bodily insecurity is not usually talked about but is extremely prevalent. Sean Illing

Tuesday, January 23 2018

GOVERNMENT OF KERALA: Pay Revision 2009 – Subordinate Judiciary – Scale of Pay of Confidential Assistant Grade II – Modified – Orders issued

Home » Kerala » You are reading » GOVERNMENT OF KERALA: Pay Revision 2009 – Subordinate Judiciary – Scale of Pay of Confidential Assistant Grade II – Modified – Orders issued GOVERNMENT OF KERALA Abstract Pay Revision 2009 – Subordinate Judiciary – Scale of Pay of Confidential Assistant Grade II – Modified – Orders issued Finance (Pay Revision Cell- D) Department G.O(P)No. 9/201 8/(2 18)/Fin Dated, Thiruvananthapuram 17.01.2018 Read: 1. Common Judgement dated 02.11.2016 of the Hon’ble High Court of Kerala in WP(c)No. 25946/13, 18546/13, 20197/14 and 29086/14. 2. Order dated 05/01/20 18 of the Hon’ble High Court of Kerala in Contempt Case CC No. 1264/2017 in WP(c)No.25946/13. 3. G.O(P)No. 85/2011/Fin dated 26.02.2011 read with G.O(P)No. 143/2011/Fin dated 30.03.2011. 4. G.O. (Ms) No. 176/12/Home dated 06.07.2012. 5. G.O(P)No. 104/2017(217)/Fin dated 11.08.2017. 6. Letter No.X2-CCC No. 1264/2017 dated 09.01.2018 from the Advocate General, Kerala. ORDER The first National Judicial Pay Commission (Justice Shetty Commission) made recommendations for the improvement of pay and service conditions of the Non-Judicial Staff of Subordinate Judiciary. The Hon’ble Supreme Court vide Order dated 07.10.2009, directed the Hon’ble High Court to ensure that all the recommendations of Shetty Commission have been implemented in the State with effect from 01.04.2003. As part of implementation of the Order of Apex Court, enhanced scales of pay to the posts of Sheristadar, Confidential Assistant Grade – I, Confidential Assistant Grade – II and Process Server were sanctioned with effect from 01.04.2003 as per Government Order read as (4) above. 2. As per Government Order read as 5″ paper above Government have modified the scales of pay of posts of Confidential Assistant Grade – I, Confidential Assistant Grade -II and Process Server in Pay Revision 2009 in compliance of judgement of Hon’ble High Court in WP(c)No. 25946/13, 18546/13, 20197/14 and 29086/14, granting corresponding revision to the pay scale recommended by Shetty Commission and sanctioned as per Government Order read as (4) above. The Advocate General vide letter read as (6) above has advised Government that on perusal of the extract of Shetty Commission Report the Single Judge found that the scale of pay applicable to Confidential Assistant is 4000-6090 (pay scale applicable to UDC). According to the report, whatever scale is applicable to the post of UDC is to be extended to the Confidential Assistants Grade -II also. The Hon’ble Division bench of the Hon’ble High Court is also of the view that Confidential Assistant Grade II is entitled for the scale of pay of UD Clerk in view of specific recommendation by Shetty Commission. Hence the Advocate General has opined that the judgement of the learned Single Bench and the Hon’ble Division Bench read as (2) above are to be complied with by giving effect to the direction of the Hon’ble Supreme Court in its Order dated 16.03.2015. 3. Government have examined the matter in detail and are pleased to modify the scale of pay of the posts of Confidential Assistant Grade – II at par with the Scale of Pay of Upper Division Clerks in Pay Revision 2009 as follows: Name of Category

General Holidays sanctioned by the Karnataka Government for the year 2018

Wednesday, January 24 2018

General Holidays sanctioned by the Karnataka Government for the year 2018

Home » Karnataka » You are reading » General Holidays sanctioned by the Karnataka Government for the year 2018 General Holidays sanctioned by the Karnataka Government for the year 2018 GOVERNMENT OF KARNATAKA Vidhana Soudh, Bengaluru, dated: 14.11.2017 The following list of the General Holidays sanctioned by the Government for the year 2018 is published for general information. All Second Saturdays, Sundays and the following days Note: 1. This Notification does not include Chandramana Ugadi (18.03.2018) which falls on Sunday and Dr.Ambedkar Jayanthi (14.04.2018) which falls on Second Saturday. 2. Government Offices will be closed through out the State on General Holidays. However, Heads of Department should make necessary arrangements for the discharge of urgent works. 3. If any of the Holidays for the festivals of Muslim Fraternity notified above does not fall on the date notified, Muslim Fraternity in Government Service may be granted holiday on the date of observance in view of the holidays already notified. 4. Local Holiday is declared for Kodagu District only on account of Huttari Festival on 24.11.2018 Saturday. General Holiday is not declared for Kodagu District for Tulasankramana, as it falls on Central Holiday on account of Mahanavami,Ayudha Pooja( 18.10.2018) 5. Separate list of Holidays will be published by the Commissioner of Public Instructions for the Education Department. 6. In addition to the General Holidays the State Government Employees may utilize any of the Restricted Holidays published in Annexure to certification-1, not exceeding two days during the year 2018 with prior permission from the authority who is authorized to sanctioned Casual Leave http://www.stategovernmentnews.in/general-holidays-sanctioned-karnataka-government-year-2018/ 2018-01-24T16:35:41+00:00 admin Karnataka Kerala government General Holidays,Kerala government holiday list 2018,Kerala State Government employees,Kerala State Government News General Holidays sanctioned by the Karnataka Government for the year 2018 GOVERNMENT OF KARNATAKA NO.DPAR 29 HHL 2017 Karnataka Government Secretary Vidhana Soudh, Bengaluru, dated: 14.11.2017 The following list of the General Holidays sanctioned by the Government for the year 2018 is published for general information. All Second Saturdays, Sundays and the following days Note: 1. This Notification... admin [email protected] Administrator State Government Employees News Kerala government General Holidays , Kerala government holiday list 2018 , Kerala State Government employees , Kerala State Government News Related Posts

Wednesday, January 24 2018

Firms’ supply chains: what does this mean for future trade policy? – UK in a changing Europe

Firms’ supply chains: what does this mean for future trade policy? Summary We often think of exports and imports as things made in one country and consumed in another – I export cars to you and import socks you’ve made. In fact, the majority of UK exports and imports are now made up of goods or services that are themselves inputs into production – I export engines to your car factory and import cotton to make into socks. This sort of trade is particularly important for understanding the UK’s trade with the EU. Over half of the UK’s imports from the EU are of such intermediate goods and services, as are nearly 70% of our exports to the EU. These shares have also been growing over time. This pattern of interdependence is crucial for understanding trade policy. Outside the single market and customs union, UK trade would still be affected not only by the trade deals it strikes with other countries but also by the trade deals the EU has with third parties. Moreover, in such an interdependent world, multilateral trade agreements are much more valuable than bilateral ones. As a result, even if the UK decides to make its own way in striking future trade deals, it will still pay to coordinate its efforts with others – including the EU. Peter Levell, a Senior Research Economist at IFS and author of this analysis, said: “Over half of the UK’s imports from the EU are goods and services that are used as inputs in domestic industries – as are nearly 70% of our exports to the EU. This pattern of interdependence is crucial for understanding the UK’s future trade policy. Outside the single market and customs union, UK trade would still be affected not only by the trade deals it strikes with other countries but also by the trade deals the EU has with third parties. Moreover, in such an interdependent world, multilateral trade agreements are more valuable than bilateral ones.” Full version Globalisation, and the accompanying internalisation of firms’ supply chains that has occurred over recent decades, have changed the way we should think about trade flows and in particular the UK’s trade with the EU. It is increasingly the case that countries’ exports embody imports from abroad, whether in the form of imported raw materials, components or business services. Supply chains play a particularly important role in UK-EU trade. Not only is the EU the UK’s largest source of imports (accounting for 54% of the total in 2016), but a majority of these imports now take the form of intermediate goods and services. These are goods or services that add to the value of a product which firms then sell either for further processing or for final consumption. Tin used to produce a can is an intermediate good. A tin of beans sold to a supermarket for sale to consumers is not. Nearly 70% of the UK’s exports to the EU take the form of intermediate inputs to production of other goods and services. The relative importance of the EU in the UK’s trade thus largely reflects the role UK industries play in EU-wide supply chains. Figure 1 shows the importance of intermediate goods and services in the UK’s trade with EU and non-EU countries, and how this has changed over time, using figures calculated from the World Input-Output Database. The share of goods and services imported from the EU that are used in the production of UK goods and services rose from 51% in 2000 to 56% in 2014. The remainder was made up of goods and services intended for final consumption. The share of intermediate inputs in imports from the EU is similar to (in fact slightly lower than) their share in imports from the rest of the world. However, intermediate goods and services tend to be more important in the UK’s exports to the EU than in its exports to other destinations. The share of the EU’s imports from the UK that were intermediate goods and services was 69% in 2014 (having increased from 61% in 2000). In total, 9.3% of the UK’s inputs are sourced from the EU. However, the degree to which different UK industries make use of inputs imported from the EU varies greatly (Figure 2). They are most important for UK manufacturers, who obtain 16% of their inputs from the EU, followed by healthcare and agriculture, which obtain 13% and 11% of their inputs from the EU respectively. Inputs from the EU are, perhaps unsurprisingly, less important for service industries such as real estate. Within the manufacturing sector, the industries that make most use of EU inputs are motor vehicles, pharmaceuticals, chemicals and electronics – incidentally, industries which also tend to export relatively more of their output to the EU. Looking instead at the importance of UK inputs for industries in the rest of the EU, the first thing to note is that the UK is a much less important source of inputs for the EU than vice versa. For example, manufacturing firms in the rest of the EU only obtain 1.5% of their inputs from the UK. One industry in which UK inputs are noticeably more important than others, however, is financial intermediation: 3.3% of inputs to the rest of the EU’s financial intermediation sector come from the UK. The total proportion of the EU’s inputs sourced from the UK is 1.4%. These facts have a number of immediate implications for the way the UK should think about its future trade policy, in terms of its trading agreements with the EU and with the rest of the world. 1) The increasingly interconnected nature of global trade means that a country’s imports and exports cannot be treated as independent quantities. A successful exporting country will also need to be open to imports. Exports embed imports, and so greater access to imports can boost the competitiveness and export performance of domestic firms. For example, according to the OECD TiVA database, 9.5% of the value-added embedded in the UK’s gross exports in 2011 was produced in the EU and a further 13.5% was produced in the rest of the world. These figures represented increases from values of 8.2% and 9.6% respectively in 2000. As a result, UK firms’ access to imports as well as export markets is an increasingly important consideration for future trade policy. The UK should take this into account before taking actions that would introduce or maintain tariffs or other trade barriers on its imports from the EU or third countries. 2) Demand for the exports of UK industry depends not only on the export access of UK-based firms but also on the export access of firms they supply. Since the UK is a relatively important supplier to EU firms, the trade deals the EU signs will continue to have relevance for the UK in the coming years, whether or not the UK leaves the customs union. This includes, of course, the access the EU has to the UK market. 3) The importance of international trading networks means that bilateral trade deals will tend to be of less value than multilateral deals. This is partly because of the importance of rules of origin requirements, which can create a complex ‘spaghetti bowl’ of overlapping agreements which firms involved in international supply chains must navigate in order to benefit from bilateral trade agreements. For example, in the EU-Korea free trade agreement, a good exported from the EU is deemed to have ‘originated’ in the EU only if less than 45% of the value of inputs has been imported from outside Korea or the EU. At present, UK imports from other EU countries therefore do not count as ‘foreign’ when determining a product’s origin and so do not limit firms’ ability to sell their goods to Korea. Equally, EU firms can freely use components manufactured in the UK. Outside the EU, the UK may well be considered a third party in such trade agreements and hence EU firms may not be able to use too many UK components in exports to Korea. Since foreign components are an important input for UK manufacturers, many firms may not be able to benefit from bilateral deals the UK signs unless the UK can get its partners to agree to less restrictive rules of origin requirements (and there may be a price to pay for this). The more countries that are included in each deal, the less of a problem this will be. A final question is whether the current importance of inputs from the EU is likely to change following Brexit. If the EU’s own tariffs exclude competition from the rest of the world, then selective post-Brexit tariff reductions on imported goods could help to improve the competitiveness of UK firms. This effect is likely to be small though. First, tariffs on the sort of intermediate goods the UK purchases from the EU (and indeed the rest of the world) already tend to be lower on average than those levied on goods used for final consumption – about 4% on intermediate goods compared with nearly 10% on goods imported for final consumption. These figures would be even lower if we took into account services inputs that essentially attract no tariff. Second, tariff reductions will not prevent the introduction of non-tariff barriers such as customs checks that would follow if the UK left the EU’s customs union and single market. These are especially important considerations for industries that value timeliness and flexibility in their supply chains (such as the car industry), and would be difficult to negotiate away in deals with third countries. By Peter Levell, Brexit co-investigator at The UK in a Changing Europe and senior research economist at the Institute for Fiscal Studies. You can read the original article here. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this analysis post are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the UK in a Changing Europe initiative.

Thursday, January 25 2018

How a Twentysomething Eagle Scout Became One of Donald Trump’s Top Trade Hands

Photo Illustration by Elizabeth Brockway/The Daily Beast On my honor, I will do my best... How a Twentysomething Eagle Scout Became One of Donald Trump’s Top Trade Hands As the Trump administration goes about revamping trade policy, a leading staffer comes under fire for his thin qualifications. 01.25.18 5:09 AM ET Photo Illustration by Elizabeth Brockway/The Daily Beast As the Trump administration tees up a slew of highly aggressive new trade policies that could upend economic relations on several continents, experts outside the government and on the Hill are concerned over the team leading the charge. More than a year into this presidency, the office at the USTR remains severely understaffed. The agency, technically a division of the White House, remains without a permanent deputy trade representative in key regions such as China and the Western Hemisphere. The Senate has yet to confirm ambassador to the World Trade Organization. But beyond who is not there, it’s who is that has raised alarm. Robert Lighthizer, the U.S. Trade Representative, is relying on a small group of relatively unseasoned officials to advance a complex agenda, including renegotiating landmark free trade deals and cracking down on allegedly unfair practices by China, Mexico, and other major global economic partners. None have drawn more scrutiny and attention within the trade policy community than G. Payne Griffin, Lighthizer’s deputy chief of staff. Few, if anyone, in trade circles knew of Griffin prior to his appointment by Lighthizer. That’s because, prior to his appointment by Lighthizer, Griffin was not in trade circles. Griffin attended American University where, by all accounts, he was an exemplary student. He graduated with a bachelors in economics and political science in 2014 and made the Dean’s List. His first job out of college was as a staff assistant for Rep. Spencer Bachus (R-AL). By January 2015, he was a legislative correspondent for Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL), a job that typically involves corresponding with constituents and helping senior staff craft policy. Typically, a stint as an LC lends itself to higher-ranking jobs within a congressional office. But in Griffin’s case, those next steps were skipped. Sessions was the first and most prominent Senate endorser of then presidential candidate Donald Trump, which meant that once Trump won the election, he had heavy influence over staffing the administration. In September 2016, a month before the campaign ended, Griffin was placed on the Trump presidential transition team’s “landing team” at the office of the United States Trade Representative. Shortly thereafter, Griffin—not even three years out of college—was appointed deputy chief of staff at USTR, one of the more powerful perches in U.S. trade policy. As part of the resume he submitted to the USTR—a resume obtained by the progressive watchdog group American Oversight and sent to The Daily Beast—he noted among his leadership skills that he was an Eagle Scout. The work experience portion included his stint as an “executive intern” at the College Republican National Committee. Neither Griffin nor USTR nor the White House returned a request for comment. That Griffin was tapped for the job says more about the Trump administration than it does about Griffin himself. A year into the Trump administration, a high-level leadership vacuum exists at numerous agencies, forcing Trump to rely on young, inexperienced officials to fill important positions in the federal government. As The Washington Post reported , the president is relying on a 24-year-old former campaign staffer to help run the White House’s top drug policy job, despite the staffer’s own dubious professional qualifications. Part of the staffing issues Trump has confronted are of his own making. A good chunk of the GOP’s political professional class has scoffed at joining the administration out of disgust with the president. But in the case of trade policy, the difficulties also have to do with the unorthodox agenda that Trump has pushed. That agenda has occasionally aligned the Trump administration with some of its most vehement critics. Progressive trade policy reform advocates and liberal Democrats in Congress have found Lighthizer to be far more receptive to their concerns than Froman was, and, despite disagreements in other policy areas, Trump’s trade policy preferences to be more in line with their own. Get The Beast In Your Inbox! Daily Digest Start and finish your day with the top stories from The Daily Beast. Cheat Sheet By clicking “Subscribe,” you agree to have read the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy Subscribe Thank You! You are now subscribed to the Daily Digest and Cheat Sheet. We will not share your email with anyone for any reason. “Donald Trump promised the American public he would hire the ‘best people,’ but everywhere you look, he’s filled key jobs with under-qualified and inexperienced political loyalists,” said Austin Evers, executive director of American Oversight. “There are thousands of jobs at stake at the NAFTA negotiating table and you can be sure that Canada and Mexico aren’t sending their B-teams.” Lightheizer has another deputy chief of staff, Pamela Marcus, who led Skadden Arps’ trade practice for 25 years. But those who interact with the office say she is not an active presence on the Hill or other meetings. Griffin, by contrast, has appeared to stake out a major role. He has attended dozens of meetings with senior congressional aides, cabinet secretaries, and foreign government officials, according to internal USTR schedules obtained by journalist Russ Kick through a Freedom of Information Act request. He has flanked Lighthizer at high-level trade negotiation sessions, and was even pictured at the literal negotiating table during high-level discussions with Mexican and Canadian officials over the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement. The only other U.S. officials present were Lighthizer, his general counsel, and the U.S.’s chief NAFTA negotiator. To a person, those who know or have interacted with Griffin say he is capable, smart, and exceedingly kind. Don Fulsom, a professor of his at American University, called him “one of my best students, ever,” noting that Griffin went on to study at the London School of Economics, played a leadership role in the classroom and even took the initiative of constructing a website for the course’s subject matter: a thorough investigation into the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Fulsom had not heard about Griffin’s career trajectory and said he was “astounded at that kind of rise.” But, he added. “I don’t doubt that he has a lot of ability and talent. Whether he should be that high is for not me to say.” Prior deputy chief of staffs at USTR have certainly had far more experience. Griffin’s immediate predecessor, Benhaz Kibria, served as an associate at the firm Hogan and Hartson, then as an assistant general counsel at the USTR, and then as trade counsel for the House Ways and Means Committee, before becoming taking on that position. And those who’ve worked with Griffin say it appears he is in over his head. “Everyone says he’s a nice guy, but doesn’t really know much about trade,” said a source familiar with USTR operations. Critics, including some former USTR staffers who declined to go on the record, have worried that the relative inexperience inside USTR—not just Griffin’s specifically—will hamper the agency as it attempts to dramatically reshape U.S. trade policy around the world. “To a large extent, the bureaucracy can operate on autopilot, but that presumes a continuation of a predecessor’s agenda,” explained Scott Lincicome, a trade attorney and policy expert at the libertarian Cato Institute. “When you are trying to go in a radically new direction… staffing matters, and that’s both at the career bureaucrat level and the political appointee level.” Vacancies in senior positions at USTR, and a subsequent reliance on less experienced staff members, can place the U.S. at a disadvantage in trade negotiations, Lincicome told The Daily Beast. “Other nations’ top negotiators might not want to negotiate with our underlings,” he said. “They need assurances that the person at the table is speaking for the president, and speaking for the United States. So when you put a low level functionary at the table with a high level negotiator, that negotiator might not be willing to put forth his country’s best offer because he can’t be guaranteed that whatever’s put on the table will remain on the table.” Beyond a potential diplomatic faux pas, trade policy can be extremely complex, especially when dealing with multilateral agreements that involve hundreds of tradeoffs and minutiae often hammered out over years of negotiations. It’s a difficult job for a seasoned veteran, Lincicome said, let alone a relative neophyte. “It’s not an insult,” Lincicome said, “to say that I wouldn’t expect anybody at a junior level to really have a mastery of these complex issues.” READ THIS LIST