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Thursday, April 26 2018

Dearness Allowance for Karnataka Government Employees from 1.1.2018

Home » Karnataka » You are reading » Dearness Allowance for Karnataka Government Employees from 1.1.2018 admin April 26, 2018 Dearness Allowance for Karnataka Government Employees from 1.1.2018 2018-04-26T08:25:18+00:00 Karnataka No Comment Dearness Allowance for Karnataka Government Employees from 1.1.2018 as per GO No.FD 6 SRP 2018 DEARNESS ALLOWANCE: The Dearness Allowance upto the index level of 276.9 of All India Average Consumer Price Index admissible to Government servants as on 1st July 2017 is merged with the basic pay while structuring the new pay scales (base 2001=100). Hence, the first installment of DA in the revised scales of pay shall be admissible from 1st January 2018. Dearness Allowance payable to Government servants shall be regulated with reference to the Dearness Allowance formula evolved by the Government of India. The Dearness Allowance payable to Government employees in the revised scales of pay shall be calculated with a multiplication factor of 0.944 % for every 1% DA to be sanctioned by the Government of India. It shall be paid twice a year from 1st January and 1st July. The inflation neutralization shall be uniform at 100% at all levels. Dearness Allowance will continue to be shown as a distinct element of remuneration. Source: www.finance.kar.nic.in http://www.stategovernmentnews.in/dearness-allowance-for-karnataka-government-employees-from-1-1-2018/ 2018-04-26T08:25:18+00:00 admin Karnataka DA,Dearness Allowance,Government servants,Karnataka government employees Dearness Allowance for Karnataka Government Employees from 1.1.2018 as per GO No.FD 6 SRP 2018 DEARNESS ALLOWANCE: The Dearness Allowance upto the index level of 276.9 of All India Average Consumer Price Index admissible to Government servants as on 1st July 2017 is merged with the basic pay while structuring the... admin [email protected] Administrator State Government Employees News

Jammu & Kashmir – Civil Services Regulations : Amendment

Thursday, April 26 2018

Jammu & Kashmir – Civil Services Regulations : Amendment

Jammu & Kashmir – Civil Services Regulations : Amendment GOVERNMENT OF JAMMU AND KASHMIR FINANCE DEPARTMENT NOTIFICATION Jammu, the 24th April, 2018. SRO- 194.- In exercise of powers conferred under section 124 of the Constitution of Jammu and Kashmir, the Governor is pleased to direct that the following amendments shall be made in the Jammu and Kashmir Civil Services Regulations, namely: In the said regulations: 1. The following shall be inserted as Note 2 below Article 27(aa) and the existing Note will be re-numbered as Note 1:- Note 2: The term “Basic Pay” w.e.f 01-01-2016 shall mean the pay drawn in the prescribed Level in the Pay Matrix, but does not include any other type of pay like special pay, etc. 2. The following shall be inserted as proviso below Article 32:- Provided that with effect from 01-01-2016, Pay means the pay drawn by a Government servant in the Level of the Pay Matrix as defined in the Jammu & Kashmir Civil Service (Revised) Pay Rules, 2018. 3. The following shall be inserted as Article 240-A (VII) below Article 240-A(VI): 240-A (VII): Notwithstanding anything contained in Article 240-A (VI) with regard to fixation of pension and maximum limit thereof, the amount of superannuation, special, retiring, compensation and invalid pension in respect of Government servants who opt for revised pay levels w.e.f. 01-01-2016 and retire on or after 01-01-2016 and have rendered the minimum qualifying service of 28 years, shall be calculated at 50% of emoluments last drawn subject to a minimum of Rs. 9000 per month (excluding the element of additional pension)and a a maximum up to 50% of the highest pay in the Govt., i.e.Rs.1,12,500. The pension of Government servants, who at the time of retirement have rendered qualifying service of 10 years or more but less than 28 years, will be in such proportion of the maximum admissible pension as the qualifying service rendered by them bears to maximum qualifying service of 28 years. Provided that the amount of superannuation, special, retiring, compensation and invalid pension in respect of Government servants who opt for revised pay levels of 01-01-2016 and retire on or after 28-04-2017 and have rendered the minimum qualifying service of 20 years, shall be calculated at 50% of emoluments last drawn subject to a minimum of ?9000 per month (excluding the element of additional pension) and a maximum up to 50% of the highest pay in the Govt., i.e. n,12,500. The pension of Government servants, who at the time of retirement have rendered qualifying service of 10 years or more but less than 20 years, will be in such proportion of the maximum admissible pension as the qualifying service rendered by them bears to maximum qualifying service of 20 years. Provided further that the Government servants, who have retired on or after 01-01-2016 up to 31-03-2018 in the pre-revised Pay Scales/ Pay Bands, shall be deemed to have actually drawn the emoluments in the revised Pay Levels for determination of Pension. With effect from 01-01-2016, full pension (i.e. pension earned by rendition of not less than the minimum qualifying service prescribed for full pension) of all the pensioners irrespective of date of their retirement shall not be less than 50% of the minimum of the pay applicable in the revised pay levels. The pension shall be sanctioned with reference to total qualifying service for pension rendered by the Government employee. Where pension has been provisionally sanctioned in cases occurring on or after 01-01-2016, the same shall be revised in terms of these rules. In case where the pension has been finally sanctioned under the pre-revised rules and if it happens to be more beneficial than the pension becoming due under this rule, the pension already sanctioned shall not be revised to the disadvantage of the pensioner. 4. The following shall be added as sub-rule (c) below Article 240- BB. In the event of death in harness on or after 01-01-2016, the rates of payment of death Gratuity shall be as under: 5. The following shall be added as Note 8 below Article 240-BB: With effect from 01-01-2016, the maximum limit of the Death-cum-Retirement Gratuity shall be Rs. 20.00 lakh. The ceiling on DCRG will increase by 25% whenever the Dearness Allowance rises by 50% of the basic pay. Provided that the Government employees who have retired/died on 01-01-2016 or may retire/die thereafter, the ‘Emoluments’ for Death¬cum-Retirement Gratuity shall mean basic pay as defined in the Note 2 below Article 27(aa) and dearness allowance as admissible on the date of retirement. Provided that w.e.f 01-01-2016, the term ‘Emoluments’ for the purpose of calculating various pensionery benefits other than ‘Retirement/Death Gratuity’ in respect of Government servants who may retire or die while in service shall mean “Basic Pay” as defined in the Note 2 below Article 27(aa)of these Regulations. In respect of the Government servants, who have elected to continue to draw pay in the pre-revised scale of pay/ Pay Band in terms of Rule 5 of the Jammu and Kashmir Civil Services (Revised Pay) Rules, 2018 and may retire or die while in service on or after 01-01-2016, the pension shall be calculated in accordance with the Rules in force immediately before the commencement of these rules. 6. The following shall be inserted as a proviso Rule 20-(A) in Family Pension -cum-Gratutiy Rules (Schedule XV): Provided that w.e.f 01-01-2016, the term “Basic Pay”, for purpose of family pension rules, shall mean basic pay as defined in the Note 2 below Article 27(aa). 7. The following shall be inserted as proviso 4 below Rule 20(BB) of Family Pension-cum-Gratuity Rules, 1964(Schedule XV): Provided that the family pension in respect of the Govt. servants who may retire or die while in service on or after 01-01-2016 shall be computed at a uniform rate of 30% of Basic Pay in all cases and shall be subject to the minimum of Rs.9000/- PM and maximum of 30% of the highest pay in the Govt. i.e. Rs.1,12,500. However, there will be no change in the rates of enhanced family pension in terms of Rule 20 of these Rules. By the order of Governor of Jammu and Kashmir. S/d,

Pay Matrix Table for Jammu & Kashmir Government Employees

Thursday, April 26 2018

Pay Matrix Table for Jammu & Kashmir Government Employees

Home » Jammu and Kashmir » You are reading » Pay Matrix Table for Jammu & Kashmir Government Employees admin April 26, 2018 Pay Matrix Table for Jammu & Kashmir Government Employees 2018-04-26T16:36:27+00:00 Jammu and Kashmir No Comment Pay Matrix Table for Jammu & Kashmir Government Employees Following the Central Government recommended by the 7th Pay Commission, the Government of Jammu & Kashmir has also accepted the Pay Matrix Table for its employees in Notification issued on 24.4.2018. Pay Matrix Table means a number table with Levels of Pay arranged in vertical cells as assigned to corresponding existing Pay Band and Grade Pay. Level in the Pay Matrix means the Level corresponding to the existing Pay Band and Grade Pay specified in the table. Pay in the level means pay in the appropriate Cell of the Level as specified in the table. Revised Pay Structure in relation to a post means the Pay Matrix and the Levels specified therein corresponding to the existing Pay Band and Grade Pay. Basic Pay in the revised pay structure means the pay drawn in the prescribed Level in the Pay Matrix. http://www.stategovernmentnews.in/pay-matrix-table-for-jammu-kashmir-government-employees/ 2018-04-26T16:36:27+00:00 admin Jammu and Kashmir Jammu and Kashmir,Jammu and Kashmir Govt Employees,JK Government Employees,JK govt employees,Pay Matrix,Pay Matrix Table Pay Matrix Table for Jammu & Kashmir Government Employees Following the Central Government recommended by the 7th Pay Commission, the Government of Jammu & Kashmir has also accepted the Pay Matrix Table for its employees in Notification issued on 24.4.2018. Pay Matrix Table means a number table with Levels of Pay... admin [email protected] Administrator State Government Employees News Jammu and Kashmir , Jammu and Kashmir Govt Employees , JK Government Employees , JK govt employees , Pay Matrix , Pay Matrix Table Related Posts

Tuesday, April 24 2018

The Young and the Restful: Why young Germans have no vision for Europe | European Council on Foreign Relations

+Young German's EU SUMMARY German millennials (those born after 1980) appear to be unambitious about reforming the European Union. Their focus is on safeguarding what has been achieved rather than creating something new. Data from various surveys and interviews indicate that Germans aged between 18 and 29 hold stereotypically German views on European and foreign policy. They maintain a cautious approach to anything related to the military, and a preference for decision-making that involves the whole EU rather smaller groups of member states. Young Germans’ ideal EU would be carefully led by Germany, and focused on European unity, peace, and ecology. It might be more involved in foreign policy, but not militarily. It would also be more welcoming to migrants. In Germany, one of the most striking differences between millennials and other age groups is how little importance they attribute to the Franco-German axis. While 53% of Germans see France as their country’s most important partner in foreign policy, only 31% of those aged between 18 and 29 hold this view. Discontent among young Germans appears to be sufficiently intense for an inspirational new political movement to capture their imaginations, but there is no sign of such a movement forming. INTRODUCTION The young are the future! Or so the world believes. Few tropes are used as regularly in democratic politics as references to the young who will determine – and hopefully save – the world of the future, by coming up with new ideas and visions. This hope is particularly present within the European Union, because the EU has a vision problem. In the early decades of the European project, its architects successfully linked their ideal of a unified Europe to initiatives that had a substantive real-life impact on citizens’ lives, such as borderless travel and a common currency. Through this combination of lofty ambition and real-world projects, they secured support from both idealists and pragmatists. But the system no longer functions as it once did. These practical projects have become a reality – along with several of their unforeseen negative consequences – and the European vision no longer shines as bright. Europe is thus looking to the young for inspiration and a vision of how to develop the project. For this, it particularly needs young people in Germany – the largest, and one of the most pro-European, member states. But unfortunately, as this report shows, young Germans are particularly unlikely to develop visionary new European politics. German millennials are surprisingly conservative and prone to status quo bias. On foreign policy, they hold stereotypically German views – from a cautious approach to anything related to the military, to a preference for keeping the EU together rather than prioritising smaller groups. While discontent among young Germans appears sufficiently intense that an inspirational new political movement could capture their imagination, there is no sign of such a movement forming. Condemned to visionlessness? French President Emmanuel Macron has understood more than anyone else that the EU cannot continue with business as usual but is in need of inspiration. Since his election in May 2017, Macron has restored some enthusiasm for the European project. He has presented his vision for Europe–“L’Europe qui protège”– and concrete proposals to achieve it. But Macron knows he cannot relaunch and reform the EU by himself. He has thus extended a hand to Germany – but, so far, no one on the other side of the Rhine has been willing to take it. [1] This is partly due to domestic political problems. Germany’s September 2017 election led to the longest deadlock in negotiations on a coalition government since 1949. But the country’s relationship with the EU is also more troubled than many outsiders assume, given the constant pro-European rhetoric. It is true that few other countries hold the EU in as high regard. For historical reasons, most Germans have been eager to strengthen the EU and were willing to replace national pride with European patriotism. Germany’s political leadership and education system have given the EU their full support. However, in recent years, amid the financial crisis and discussions about Germany saving Greek pensioners, some Germans have become disillusioned with the European project and begun to express doubt about its future. In the 2017 election, Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) became the first right-wing populist party to enter the German parliament since the Second World War, having won support partly through the use of eurosceptic and anti-euro slogans. The AfD’s presence has already changed the tone in political discussions, while political fragmentation into seven parties in the Bundestag has made government formation difficult (a coalition needs an absolute majority in parliament). [2] Germany therefore has a double imperative to renew the vision of the European project – for Europe’s sake, and for its own. And yet, unfortunately for Macron, Germany is a terrible partner for this task. The country that gave the world the word “leitmotiv” has trouble defining any kind of political leitmotiv for itself, let alone the EU. This is partly by design. Germans take pride in having moved beyond ideology. As former chancellor Helmut Schmidt put it, in a phrase often used in German public discourse: “people who have visions should go see a doctor”. But Schmidt said this sometime in the 1970s, when the horrors of Nazi Germany had occurred recently, and East Germany needed a wall to keep people from escaping the devastating consequences of communist ideology. In other words, Germany’s aversion to political ideologies used to be a sensible choice. Yet it has become a fetish that bans not only ideologies but all kinds of political visions, hampering Germany’s ability to act. This suspicion of ideology has boosted the stability and efficiency of the political system. But it has also inhibited the creation of new ideas. Germany’s two largest centrist parties have led every government since 1949. Radical or revolutionary ideas have been confined to the political fringe. The German Basic Law, the constitution, favours stability and does not limit the number of times a chancellor can be elected – an unusual provision in the Western world. As a result, Germany, for the second time in 35 years, has a chancellor who is set to remain in office for four terms, or 16 years. In the 2017 election campaign and subsequent attempts to form a coalition government, German leaders’ lack of vision was particularly on display. The election slogans were empty: from “for a Germany in which we like to live” (the Christian Democratic Union/Christian Social Union, or CDU/CSU) to “you can want future – or do it” (the Greens). Then there was the especially hollow Social Democratic Party (SPD) poster showing chancellor candidate Martin Schulz next to the slogan “the future needs ideas – and someone who can enforce them”. But the SPD was unable to define what exactly these ideas were, contributing to its election debacle. In the end, Germany got another “Grand Coalition” between the CDU/CSU and the SPD, after negotiations on a proposed “Jamaica coalition”– named for the black, yellow, and green of the Jamaican flag, the party colours of the CDU/CSU, the Free Democratic Party (FDP), and the Greens respectively – came to nothing. In a very German fashion, the Jamaica coalition did not rupture over diverging ideas for Germany’s future, but because the head of the liberal FDP did not feel that there was sufficient trust between the parties. Macron has been acutely aware of this German handicap, picking up on this issue in a January 2017 speech at the Humboldt University of Berlin. There, quoting Jacques Delors, he argued: “‘For Europe, we need a vision and a screwdriver.’” Macron continued, “Unfortunately, we currently have a lot of screwdrivers, but we are still lacking a vision.” [3] Yet he saw light on the horizon – in the form of the next generation. Near the end of his speech, Macron added: “The European construction was initiated by men of experience, instructed by the tragedy of the European civil war. It now relies on young people like you, a generation that knows what a crisis is, that discovers the turmoil of the world and the violence of history.” This may sound like the kind of typical appeal to the young that can be found in almost any political speech. But the reason why Macron’s comment may have been more than the usual empty rhetoric is that, across Europe, disillusioned young people have begun to take politics into their own hands. A German “youthquake”? It started slowly. In summer 2016, the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the EU provided yet another demonstration of the political weakness of my generation: 29% of British voters between the ages of 18 and 24 voted for Brexit – compared to 64% of those over the age of 65. [4] As we know, the old won against the young. [5] A similar dynamic was at play in the US presidential election later that year. [6] But, following these events – and partly because of them – something has started to change in Western politics. In June 2017, when Brexit beneficiary Theresa May called a snap election to cement her position as prime minister, many young people rallied behind Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party, contributing to the Conservative Party’s loss of its parliamentary majority. [7] “Youthquake”– defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people”– became Oxford Dictionaries’ word of 2017, a year that saw the 39-year-old Macron become president of France and a 31-year-old become Austrian chancellor. [8] This trend is continuing in 2018, with US teenagers taking on the federal government over gun control. The internet may have turned millennials (people born after 1980 or thereabouts) into punchlines but, increasingly, the millennial generation is driving political change. [9] But could something similar happen in Germany? Germany has the highest average age – 44 years – of any European country, with 21% of Germans older than 64 and only 13% younger than 15. [10] This has political consequences. In 2013, for the first time, more than half of all registered voters were older than 50. In the current political landscape, a party would be able to become the second strongest faction in parliament merely by winning the votes of all Germans who are 71 or older. In contrast, a party supported only by all voters under the age of 21 would not enter parliament. Unsurprisingly, the baby boomer generation – people born before 1965 – occupies nearly every key executive position. Chancellor Angela Merkel is a baby boomer, as is her erstwhile rival Schulz. In September 2017, the youngest member of the cabinet was 57. The typical member of parliament is just short of his or her 50th birthday; the average party member is even older. And yet there has been some hope of a German youthquake. Few people knew of Kevin Kühnert – head of Jusos (Young Socialists), the youth organisation of the Social Democratic Party (SPD) – before January 2018. The 28-year-old quickly rose to fame by leading his party’s opposition to the coalition deal between the Christian Democratic Union/Christian Social Union (CDU/CSU) and the SPD, coming close to toppling it. Much of the German media initially covered this youth uprising by infantilising Kühnert. For example, journalist Sibylle Krause-Burger wrote: “the baby fat is still there – you can still see the little boy in him.” [11] The wider media generally referred to him as “Kevin”. Meanwhile, older politicians appearing on talk shows addressed him using the informal “du” instead of the formal “Sie”. The Jusos’ movement was dismissed as a “dwarf uprising”– a label Kühnert, who is 1.7 metres tall, cleverly embraced. [12] After being repeatedly asked questions about clearing his political views with his parents or living in a flat share, he tweeted that he would answer them once Merkel had been asked about whether she licked the top of yoghurt pots. [13] In the tweet, Kühnert used the hashtag #diesejungenleute (“these young people”), which quickly began trending as thousands of young Germans shared their stories about being treated dismissively due to their age. A poll revealed that an extraordinary 83% of Germans between the ages of 18 and 29 believed their generation was not sufficiently represented in German politics. [14] On the homepage of its website, Jusos even provide a guide to responding to age-based criticism. [15] As a result of this debate, media coverage of youth politics became more favourable, and political pressure for change began to build. [16] Suddenly, there were calls for an age-balanced cabinet – including from the Junge Union, the CDU/CSU’s youth organisation. Merkel felt compelled to give a cabinet post to the 37-year-old Jens Spahn (incidentally, one of her biggest critics). It looks as though the German millennial generation, having been told all their lives that they were the minority, have begun to embrace that label – and are demanding affirmative action. But what would change if German millennials alone decided on the EU’s future? German millennials Conventional wisdom has it that young voters are more radical than their elders. But German millennials are surprisingly conservative. The conservative CDU/CSU, in government since 2005, gains a larger share of votes from those aged 18-34 (25%) than any other party. And while in the 2017 election both “Volksparteien”– the CDU/CSU and SPD – gained fewer votes than in the previous election, their losses were least severe among young people. The CDU/CSU also has the largest youth organisation of any German party, both in absolute terms (with 109,400 members) and as a proportion of the party (19%). The liberal FDP has the second-highest proportion of young members. Maybe German millennials’ formative experiences can explain this apparent conservatism? Having lived through major events at roughly the same age, members of a single generation have things they understand uniquely well and things they miss. And although people may change their political views as they age, members of a generation share experiences that colour their perspectives. These generational divergences can be observed in polls. For instance, 15% of Germans believe that the United States plays a balanced role in global affairs, the rest are almost evenly split on whether the country engages with the rest of the world too little or too much. But there are important differences between generations. Most of those aged 44 or younger, particularly those between the ages of 30 and 44, believe that the US is too dominant. Of course, this is the generation for whom the 2003 Iraq War (with all its negative consequences) was a major event in their formative years. A 35-year-old German experienced the onset of the war as a 20-year-old – and probably protested against it. For those born during 1980-1985, some of the major events of their teens and early twenties include the Kosovo War, 9/11, and the beginning of the “war on terror”. For those born in 1990 or later, they were the 2003 Iraq War, the financial and euro crisis, and the Arab uprisings and subsequent wars in the Middle East. Significant EU achievements such as the establishment of the Schengen Area and the euro happened so early in millennials’ lives that most took them for granted, being unable to remember the time before they occurred. Hence, young Germans’ apparent conservatism appears to be first and foremost a status quo bias. This fits with the results of the Shell Youth Studies, a series of surveys commissioned to document the attitudes, opinions, and expectations of young Germans. The titles of the last three studies are telling: 1994: “generation cool disinterest”; 2002 “generation cuddle”, and 2010 “generation Biedermeier”. [17] The title of the last study refers to the period between the Congress of Vienna and the European revolutions of 1848, during which the middle class retreated into the security and predictability of the home. “A fear of crisis has become the central youth feeling”, one of the study’s authors argued. [18] One poll, however, suggests that young Germans may yet be good for a few surprises. It seems many young people are voting for status quo parties without real conviction. Despite predominantly casting votes for the CDU/CSU or the SPD, when asked to name the party that best represents their generation’s interests, 23.2% of young people identify the Greens, while 19.5% say Die Linke, 13% the FDP, 11.4% the AfD, 11% the CDU/CSU, and 9.1% the SPD. [19] These inconsistencies suggest that there is substantial political dissatisfaction among young Germans that a new political movement could tap. The speed with which the young took up the issue of what writer Sascha Lobo calls “rampant generation contemptibility” suggests that they have real grievances. [20] That more than two-thirds of young Germans feel they are not represented in politics is worrisome – but it also points to an opening for politicians able to connect with the young. Young Germans’ EU Polls and interviews conducted for this study suggest that there is no one vision of Europe that unites young Germans. While a few German political forces have sweeping visions – such as the FDP Junge Liberale’s federal Europe, and the AfD’s return to the trade-only logic of the European Economic Community – most only have ideas for “screwdrivers”. [21] Like their parents, the young think rather small. The SPD’s youthquake, for instance, did not produce a grand vision; Kühnert’s leitmotiv was “let’s be dwarfs today, so that we can be giants tomorrow”. A s one journalist commented, “not even Helmut Schmidt would have sent him to the doctor” for that type of vision. [22] Still, polls –particularly the Körber Stiftung’s 2017 Berlin Pulse poll, when broken down by age groups – and interviews with young German politicians allow one to find out what Germany’s Europe policy would look like if it was determined by the young. [23] Overall, young Germans remain committed to European integration, with 30% of them regarding Europe as “the only project for the future” and 38% seeing it as “a necessary construction”. Both figures are among the highest in any European country. [24] Yet young Germans are concerned about the EU’s direction. Although they are more likely than other age groups to argue that the EU “is on the right path”, more than half of them worry that the EU is not moving in the right direction. Conception of the EU, allies, and enlargement Sociologists argue that, in their professional lives, German millennials value flat hierarchies and dislike top-down approaches. [25] In European politics, this translates into a preference for collaboration with all EU member states rather than partnerships such as the Franco-German alliance. Similarly, they appear to oppose a division between “core” and “peripheral” EU countries. In fact, one of the most striking differences between millennials and other Germans is how little importance they attribute to the relationship with France. While 53% of Germans see France as their country’s most important partner in foreign policy, only 31% of those aged between 18 and 29 hold this view. This is surprising given the election of Macron, who is popular in Germany, including among the young. At the same time, more than one-third of young Germans could not identify Germany’s most important partner in foreign policy, pointing to a general sense of uncertainty. In Germany, there is much greater support for EU enlargement among the young than any other age group (all age groups, however, oppose Turkish accession). However, though supportive of enlargement, many young politicians interviewed for this report recommended that the EU “take a moment to reform itself” before accepting more members. Millennials actively engaged in German politics generally see internal EU reform as important, with many stating that the organisation can only move forward if it reforms its institutions. Several interviewees suggested that the EU should gradually shift away from decision-making based on unanimity and towards majority voting, including in foreign policy. They also supported a system in which the organisation has more power to reprimand member states that violate its rules. European defence and security Although the overwhelming majority of German millennials have no direct experience with war in Europe, 80% of those aged between 15 and 24 believe that peace on the continent is the EU’s greatest achievement, and efforts to address climate change as the organisation’s second most important accomplishment. [26] Young Germans are relatively supportive of German engagement in international crises – in fact, those aged between 18 and 29 are the only group in which the majority supports more engagement in foreign policy. However, this increased engagement does not include greater military engagement. Although 58% of all Germans like the idea of a European army, less than half of those aged between 18 and 29 hold this view. In the same vein, 21% of German millenials back a decrease in Germany’s defence budget, compared to 12% in the other age groups (the majority advocate no change in spending). Germany’s role in the EU According to many sociologists, in their professional lives, millennials like working in teams. However, when it comes to Germany’s role in the EU, Germans aged between 18 and 29 are relatively supportive of Germany taking on more leadership responsibility. While 46% believe that the country currently strikes a good balance in this area, 39% think it should be more assertive, the largest proportion of any age group. Migration Young Germans are more open to migration than their counterparts in other European countries, with 80% believing it enriches their cultural diversity. [28] Although Germans generally support the establishment of Obergrenze (an upper limit on the number of immigrants allowed into their country), the young reject this idea. The young also have more reservations than other age groups about support for African states that violate human rights to prevent refugees from travelling to Europe. Young Germans’ ideal EU, it appears, would be carefully led by Germany, and focused on European unity, peace, and ecology. It might be more involved in foreign policy, but not militarily. It would also be more welcoming to migrants. It is the ideal of an EU that could afford the luxury of indifference to the outside world. Taken together, the polls paint a picture of young Germans’ views as being almost stereotypically German, as they reject hard choices and are wary of anything military. Their focus is on safeguarding what has been achieved rather than creating something new (interestingly, in a rare agreement, both a young AFD MP and a young Green activist interviewed for this policy brief spoke about preserving the achievements of the enlightenment). Most German millennials regard the EU as a success story, and fear that its achievements may eventually be lost because many take them for granted. Defending the status quo is the common denominator in German millennials’ views. As one of the respondents in a youth study noted, they hope above all that “everything remains as it is”. [27] This may explain why, in Germany, fringe parties, including the AfD and Die Linke, have relatively old memberships and leaders. In contrast, young people are at the forefront of such parties in many other European countries. For instance, a 35-year-old leads a new group rivalling Geert Wilder’s Party for Freedom in the Netherlands, while the head of Italy’s Five Star Movement is 31. Most, if not all, German millennials appear to be unambitious about creating a new vision for the EU. Retaining what they have is largely enough for them. As journalist Simon Kuper notes, “Brexit and Trump have mobilised a generation of young people, taught them that government matters, and shown that not screwing up is a lofty goal”. [29] This may also explain the high support for conservative parties. The philosopher Michael Oakeshott wrote in 1956 that to be conservative “is to prefer the familiar to the unknown, to prefer the tried to the untried, fact to mystery, the actual to the possible, the limited to the unbounded, the near to the distant, the sufficient to the superabundant, the convenient to the perfect, present laughter to utopian bliss”. [29] Kleine Frage / Small question -- Erich Fried Glaubst du

Tuesday, April 24 2018

Kate Osamor: “This world is messed up” | PoliticsHome.com

Posted On: 12th April 2018 The traumatic pictures coming out of Syria have reignited the charged debate about foreign intervention. Labour’s Kate Osamor has been wrestling to try and find the right answer – but believes Bashar al-Assad must be “removed” if found to have carried out a chemical weapons attack on his own people. And as world leaders gather in London for CHOGM, the Shadow International Development Secretary is pushing to make sure human rights remain firmly on the agenda. She talks to Emilio Casalicchio Shadow International Development Secretary Kate Osamor Credit: Paul Heartfield When footage of dead children and babies foaming at the mouth started to spread around the internet on Saturday, Kate Osamor began to cry. The Shadow International Development Secretary says the “awful” images in the aftermath of the chemical weapons attack in Douma, Syria, prompted a key question: “Who could do this?” It’s a question that continues to dog her. As observers pointed the finger at Syrian president Bashar al-Assad, while others countered that the attack was launched by rebel forces fighting the civil war, her resolve at the need for a UN investigation to clear the matter up once and for all was stiffened. “We need independent eyes to go in and for all sides – all leaders or people who are purported to be leaders – to be questioned as to whether they have access to these weapons,” she explains. Osamor insists that the UN has failed to accuse the Syrian government outright of chemical weapons attacks over the past few years (despite a UN/OPCW conclusion in 2016 that official forces used chlorine in three cases and another verdict in 2017 that Sarin was used in Khan Sheikhoun in the north of the country in the deadliest use of the nerve agent in three years). “It isn’t for the want of trying,” she explains. “It’s that evidence that comes out of it can’t be 110%... I genuinely want to know, why are there all these investigations, and when we get to the end we still can’t say ‘it is X, Y and Z’?” Osamor says there must be “something more” as to why Assad has not yet been called out by the global coalition, and demands a fresh probe so she can “hope and pray that we would be able to get to a better result than what we have got”. She calls on the UN investigatory bodies to be transparent about their work to ensure people “have faith” in another investigation and to prevent any counterclaims from troublesome states – like Russia, presumably. Naturally, the poison attack has reignited the debate about foreign intervention, and much soul-searching about why the Commons blocked action against Assad back in 2013. It is unlikely Jeremy Corbyn would ever back a military move against the Syrian government, and Osamor equivocates when asked if intervention can be justified. “I think what we have seen over the years is that when the intervention takes place the outcome sometimes can be even more devastating than the time before the intervention,” she explains. “I don’t know if it outweighs it. I just don’t know.” But on Assad, she quickly adds: “That person needs to be removed. I mean, intervention must take place if evidence comes back that the PM or the president or whoever the leader is, is gassing his own people.” However, she warns: “It’s not as easy as just removing someone. I think that’s what needs to happen. They always seem to abscond, end up in another country... This world is messed up... it’s not easy. But if a leader is killing their own they need to be removed. We don’t keep them there. They need to go. He needs to be removed. But how do you remove someone? I’m saying this almost as a layman, but I know politically you can’t just remove somebody who is elected.” (The Syrian dictator has gained eye-wateringly high majorities in votes branded a sham by the west but “free and fair” by allies). The solution to the quandary, according to Osamor? The UN must “think outside the box” on how to get rid of him, since the “same old same old doesn’t work”. She adds: “Especially when you are dealing with someone who is laughing in the face of democracy.” --- The unsure footing over foreign policy has become the fallback of the Labour frontbench – especially when it comes to the leader himself. Jeremy Corbyn faced criticism for failing to call out Russia in the wake of the Salisbury nerve agent attack, but has spoken out in strong language at the Saudi regime over alleged human rights abuses in Yemen or at Israel when it comes to Palestinian protesters killed in Gaza. It was a discrepancy picked up on when Labour released an unnamed statement in the wake of the Syrian chemical weapons attack, which failed to point the finger at anyone specific, simply saying “anyone responsible” should be brought to justice and calling for “concrete steps on all sides” to start peace talks. Corbyn did follow up a few hours later with a tweet of his own, again fingering "those responsible". As usual, critics of the Labour leader accused him of being soft on Russia and Iran. But Osamor has a radical proposal that could solve the headaches: Corbyn should stop commenting on foreign policy. “First and foremost, he should allow the spokesperson for that department really to respond,” she explains. “If that’s what he’s being assessed on... then he should just let his spokesperson speak because it seems that whatever he says is not good enough – it’s too strong or it’s not strong enough.” She argues his responses to foreign affairs distract from the central issue – the atrocity or despot at hand – and even if his tone and approach were sufficient he would still be called out because of “the relationship he’s had with those countries” in the past. She argues being the party leader rather than the Foreign Secretary or the Prime Minister means he in fact “doesn’t need to” put his two cents in all the time. Corbyn’s foreign policy positions have helped fuel the Labour debate around anti-Semitism, after his associations with the fringes of the Palestinian rights movement left him open to accusations that he is unable or unwilling to call out anti-Jewish racism. As a passionate campaigner on the Israel/Palestine debate herself, Osamor insists Labour must ensure the focus remains on “the state” and how it treats civilians. “It can never be about Jewish people. And once you start doing that, unfortunately, people become anti-Semitic,” she explains. But her own approach to the issue sparked a row in December last year when she backed the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement against Israel on Twitter, as Donald Trump announced the move of the US embassy to Jerusalem. She argued at the time that her intervention was not at odds with Labour policy (which is against blanket boycotts) as BDS targets its action at those companies and institutions “complicit” in the violation of Palestinian human rights – even though Shadow Foreign Secretary Emily Thornberry spoke out against any boycott of products and Deputy Labour Leader Tom Watson said the campaign itself was “morally wrong”. Osamor suggests Watson should do more reading before he comments again. “Sometimes people make statements but then they don’t look about the history around apartheid, around separation, around people living side by side,” she says. She argues the boycott of South African produce between the 1960s and 1980s made a difference to the rights debate in the country. “For me it’s about raising awareness and bringing more people to a place where they understand ‘what can I do to help’,” she says. “And at the end of the day it is choice. It’s up to you what produce you buy.” But she leaves the door open to limiting that choice – at least for the Labour frontbench – and one day adopting a boycott as party policy. “I think we need to get to a place where we start educating everybody and make a decision based on that and then say, ‘this could be an alternative, this could be an option’,” she explains. “I would not say at this point in opposition we should be planning around boycotting without educating a whole generation that have missed out on that and don’t understand what’s going on.” Something Osamor does want to talk about in the present is the way the UK should approach its aid policy. She and Corbyn recently launched a new roadmap, ‘A world for the many not the few’, which radically changes the Labour approach to focus on feminist values and reducing inequality around the world – rather than just poverty. She explains that the Department for International Development should not pull support as nations move from ‘developing’ to ‘middle income’ status with a few high-net-worth individuals, but rather dig in to make sure an element of fairness takes hold for the “long-term”. “Why aren’t we now helping these countries that have individuals who maybe are millionaires who are known on the global stage?” she asks. Meanwhile, the drive around feminism is about working with civil society groups to ensure women “are round the table when it comes to resolving conflict”, she explains. “I am not saying men should not be at the forefront of any change,” she insists. “But I am saying women have a core role in change.” She argues the change in approach to both aspects should feed into tackling the issue of abuse in the aid sector, which came to light with the revelations about Oxfam staff using prostitutes in the wake of the Haiti earthquake. “If inequality is already in the agencies how is that going to reflect in the work they do on the ground?” she asks. “Unfortunately, this scandal has exposed that those people who are at the top have little regard for those who are at the bottom.” Osamor blasts the “status quo” in which “we have white men at the top and we have women, we have minority groups, we have other groups underneath”, and argues a change in the hierarchy and pay structures would empower the vulnerable to speak out about abuse. “What I’m saying is there was no safety net for those people who were in those roles which were not so senior in those organisations,” she explains. --- The next big date in the diary for Osamor is this month’s Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting. A political storm is gathering as campaigners condemn the government for failing to address LGBT rights issues in many of the 53 nations involved. Indeed, Boris Johnson faced a backlash in February for refusing to intervene when Bermuda repealed same-sex marriage. According to campaigner Peter Tatchell, some 37 of the Commonwealth states currently impose anti-gay laws. Osamor says the government should be more vocal around rights issues, as the nations are “potentially going to be our partners after Brexit” – a dream harboured by the likes of Johnson and Liam Fox. But she warns that the UK has to be “mindful” about a “gung-ho” approach to nations where faith serves as a key decision driver. And rather than seeing the UK as an agent for change abroad, she says Britain would do better to be more reflective about how it treats Commonwealth citizens at home. Osamor has cases in her Edmonton constituency, she explains, of people who have lived in the UK for decades but are now being deported because their paperwork is not up to scratch. “We need to look at the way we treat our citizens who have come from the Commonwealth first and foremost before we start lecturing anybody else,” she says. A major item on the CHOGM agenda will be whether or not Prince Charles has the right to become the next leader of the Commonwealth. The meeting is expected to be the last attended by the Queen, and the title is not necessarily hereditary. One person the Prince of Wales cannot count on for support is Kate Osamor. “I don’t particularly think it should be him,” she says. “Not because I have an issue with the royal family. I just don’t think it should be him. I don’t really know what he’s been up to of late. He’s not been that vocal on issues.” On who she would prefer, Osamor refuses to give a name. But she hopes for a “progressive” who will give a voice to those around the Commonwealth who might be at risk in the pursuit of Brexit. “We just need someone who’s level-headed, someone people respect but also someone who thinks outside the box,” she says. If thinking outside the box is on the job description, maybe Osamor herself – with her takes on Syria, her leader speaking on foreign policy, Israeli boycotts, the approach to aid and whether Prince Charles can lead the Commonwealth – should throw her hat into the ring. Contributions from readers There are currently no comments on this article - be the first to comment by logging in or registering for a free account . Associated Organisation The House Magazine is the leading publication for MPs and peers, with content for and about members of both houses of Parliament and contributions from a range of policy experts and political commentators. 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Saturday, April 21 2018

The Union Cabinet on Saturday approved an ordinance to allow courts to award death penalty to those convicted of raping children up to 12 years of age.

Home » General News » You are reading » The Union Cabinet on Saturday approved an ordinance to allow courts to award death penalty to those convicted of raping children up to 12 years of age. admin April 21, 2018 The Union Cabinet on Saturday approved an ordinance to allow courts to award death penalty to those convicted of raping children up to 12 years of age. 2018-04-21T09:42:11+00:00 General News No Comment Union cabinet approves ordinance for death penalty for rape of children The Union Cabinet on Saturday approved an ordinance to allow courts to award death penalty to those convicted of raping children up to 12 years of age. Official sources said here that the criminal law amendment ordinance seeks to amend the Indian Penal Code (IPC), the Evidence Act, the Code of Criminal Procedure (CrPC) and the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences (POCSO) Act to introduce a new provision to sentence convicts of such crimes punishment of death The move comes against the backdrop of the alleged rape and murder of girls in Jammu and Kashmir’s Kathua and Gujarat’s Surat district recently The rape of a minor in Uttar Pradesh’s Unnao district had also outraged the nation The ordinance would be now sent to the President for his approval. PTI http://www.stategovernmentnews.in/the-union-cabinet-on-saturday-approved-an-ordinance-to-allow-courts-to-award-death-penalty-to-those-convicted-of-raping-children-up-to-12-years-of-age/ 2018-04-21T09:42:11+00:00 admin General News Code of Criminal Procedure,death penalty,government ordinanc,Indian Penal Code,POCSO,Protection of Children from Sexual Offences,rape of children,Union Cabinet Union cabinet approves ordinance for death penalty for rape of children The Union Cabinet on Saturday approved an ordinance to allow courts to award death penalty to those convicted of raping children up to 12 years of age. Official sources said here that the criminal law amendment ordinance seeks to amend... admin [email protected] Administrator State Government Employees News

Saturday, April 21 2018

Puducherry Lt Governor asks IAS officers to reach out to the poor

Home » Puducherry » You are reading » Puducherry Lt Governor asks IAS officers to reach out to the poor admin April 21, 2018 Puducherry Lt Governor asks IAS officers to reach out to the poor 2018-04-21T09:44:24+00:00 Puducherry No Comment Puducherry Lt Governor asks IAS officers to reach out to the poor Lt Governor Kiran Bedi today asked bureaucrats here to identify the poorest and backward areas and take facilities to the people at their doorsteps.” “Officers should meet the poorer sections of people at their doorstep through field visits. We cannot expect the people to visit us as that would mean practical hardship,” she said at a function here to mark Civil Services Day. She further said in her experience as Lt Governor of the union territory over the last nearly two years she understood “Puducherry is far better than several places across the country.” Bedi, who herself has been undertaking field visits, said there was no deficiency in resources, rules and policies in the Union Territory. “What is deficient is lack of last-minute connectivity which meant that the officers should spread out far and wide and make improvement in amenities for the common man,” she said. Chief Minister V Narayanasamy, who also felicitated the IAS officers, said a state-level university was under consideration of the government by clubbing arts and science colleges and other state government-run institutions. PTI http://www.stategovernmentnews.in/puducherry-lt-governor-asks-ias-officers-to-reach-out-to-the-poor/ 2018-04-21T09:44:24+00:00 admin Puducherry Kiran Bedi,Puducherry Lt Governor,Puducherry State Government News,PuducherryIAS officers Puducherry Lt Governor asks IAS officers to reach out to the poor Lt Governor Kiran Bedi today asked bureaucrats here to identify the poorest and backward areas and take facilities to the people at their doorsteps.” “Officers should meet the poorer sections of people at their doorstep through field visits. We... admin [email protected] Administrator State Government Employees News

Saturday, April 21 2018

9 new ministers to take oath in Punjab State Government

Home » Punjab » You are reading » 9 new ministers to take oath in Punjab State Government admin April 21, 2018 9 new ministers to take oath in Punjab State Government 2018-04-21T09:46:10+00:00 Punjab No Comment 9 new ministers to take oath in Punjab State Government Nine new cabinet ministers are set to take oath tomorrow in Punjab, after Congress chief Rahul Gandhi approved their names in a meeting with state chief minister Amarinder Singh. The new ministers are Sukhjinder Singh Randhawa, Sukhbinder Singh Sarkaria, Vijay Inder Singla, Bharat Bhushan Ashu, Shyam Sunder Arora, O P Soni, Rana Gurmit Singh Sodhi, Gurpreet Singh Kangar and Balbir Sidhu. Amarinder Singh congratulated them and announced that swearing-in ceremony will take place tomorrow at 6 pm at Punjab Raj Bhawan. “Happy to announce the names of the new Cabinet Ministers … Congratulation to all!,” he said. The state chief minister held a second round of discussion with Rahul Gandhi today before announcing the names. According to sources, their meeting today lasted around an hour. They held a similar meeting yesterday and Amarinder was asked by Rahul Gandhi to provide the seniority list of the MLAs. The expansion has been pending for a long time and many senior MLAs were eyeing a ministerial berth. At present there are nine ministers, including Amarinder Singh, and with nine new ministers, the Punjab government will touch the maximum strength of 15 per cent of the state assembly. PTI http://www.stategovernmentnews.in/9-new-ministers-to-take-oath-in-punjab-state-government/ 2018-04-21T09:46:10+00:00 admin Punjab Punjab 9 new ministers,Punjab Government,Punjab state government,Punjab State Government News 9 new ministers to take oath in Punjab State Government Nine new cabinet ministers are set to take oath tomorrow in Punjab, after Congress chief Rahul Gandhi approved their names in a meeting with state chief minister Amarinder Singh. The new ministers are Sukhjinder Singh Randhawa, Sukhbinder Singh Sarkaria, Vijay Inder... admin [email protected] Administrator State Government Employees News

Saturday, April 21 2018

Revision of Pension and other related benefits to the retired employees of Kerala State Social Welfare Board – Sanctioned – Orders issued

Home » Kerala » You are reading » Revision of Pension and other related benefits to the retired employees of Kerala State Social Welfare Board – Sanctioned – Orders issued Revision of Pension and other related benefits to the retired employees of Kerala State Social Welfare Board – Sanctioned – Orders issued. GOVERNMENT OF KERALA Abstract Revision of Pension and other related benefits to the retired employees of Kerala State Social Welfare Board – Sanctioned – Orders issued. FINANCE (PENSION – B) DEPARTMENT G.O (P) No. 48 /2018/Fin Dated, Thiruvananthapuram, 23.03.2018 Read: 1. G.O (Ms) No. 16/2014/SJD dalted 25.02.2014 . 2. G.O (P) No. 09/20161Fin dated 20.01.2016 3. Letter.No.KSWB1/Estt/Pen.Rev./2015-16/691 dated 02.02.2016 from the Secretary, Kerala State Social Welfare Board, Thiruvananthapuram. ORDER As per the GO read 1st above, sanction was accorded to implement Pension Scheme to the Kerala State Social Welfare Board employees (employees joined upto 31.03.2014) and retired employees with effect from 01.04.1991 with the conditions that all monetary benefits will be extended from 01.04.2010 onwards and Central Social Welfare Board will bear the 50% of financial liability. At Present; 9th pension revision is being implemented in the Board. The Secretary, Kerala State Social Welfare Board vide letter read as 3rd above has requested Government to revise the pension and other related benefits of retired employees of Kerala State Social Welfare Board in accordance with the Government Order read as 2nd above. 2) Government have examined the matter in detail and are pleased to sanction 10th pension revision which has been allowed to state service pensioners, vide G.O read as 2nd above to the retired employees of Kerala State Social Welfare Board on condition stipulated in the order read 1st above. Pensioners / Family pensioners prior to 01 /07/2014 are eligibility to draw the state share ie, 50% in terms of pension arrears from 01.07.2014 to 28.02.2018 on account of revision of pension. By Order of tbe Governor DR.SHARMILA MARY JOSEPH lAS

Saturday, April 21 2018

Pay and Pension Revision 2014 – Payment of Third installment of Arrears – Revised order

Home » Kerala » You are reading » Pay and Pension Revision 2014 – Payment of Third installment of Arrears – Revised order Pay and Pension Revision 2014 – Payment of Third installment of Arrears – Revised order GOVERNMENT OF KERALA Pay and Pension Revision 2014 – Payment of Third Instalment of Arrears – Revised Orders Issued. FINANCE (ANOMALY RECTIFICATION CELL) DEPARTMENT G.O.(P)No.50/2018/Fin Dated,Thiruvananthapuram, 26/03/2018 ORDER As per Government Order read as first above, orders have been issued revising pay and allowances of State Government Employees and Teachers with effect from 01.07.2014, wherein it has been ordered that the amount of arrears on account of pay revision will be paid in cash in four equal instalments on 01.04.2017, 01.10.2017, 01.04.2018 and 01.10.2018 respectively along with interest on the arrears not drawn as on the above dates at the rate admissible to the Provident Fund. In the Circular read as 2nd above, detailed guidelines have been issued on the modalities for the disbursement of arrears. As per the G.O read as 4th and 8th above, revised orders were issued for crediting first and second instalment of arrears along with interest, to the Provident Fund Account of employees. 2. Government are now pleased to order that the third instalment of Pay Revision arrears and interest thereon which fell due for payment on 01.04.2018 will also be credited to the Provident Fund Account of the employees, observing the following guidelines: (1) Interest @ of 7.6% per annum for the period from 01.10.2017 to 31.03.2018 will be admissible for the remaining 50% of the undrawn arrear as on 1.4.2018. The total amount of principal and interest will be credited to the Provident Fund Account of the employees. Punitive actions proposed against the DDOs in the Circular read as 7th paper above will be initiated against DDOs who fail to cred it the third instalment of arrears before 30.06.2018. (2) In the case of va rious categories of employees, arrears will be credited by the respective Drawing and Disbursing Officers as directed in clause 9 in the Circular read as 2nd above. (3) In the case of employees of Local Self Government Institutions, the arrears will be credited to the Provident Fund of employees by the respective Drawing and Disbursing Officers as directed in the Circular read as 3rd above. (4) In the case of employees mentioned under clause 2 in the Circular read as 2nd above, the Drawing and Disbursing Officers should ensure that arrears had been remitted to the Government account before crediting the arrears to the Provident Fund Account. In the cases where the first and second instalments of arrears are yet to be credited for want of remittance by the foreign employer, first, second and third instalment of arrears can be credited to the Provident Fund Account subject to the condition that the foreign employer should have remitted the entire amount of arrea rs and interest thereon to the Government account. (5) ln the case of the following sets of employees, arrears along with interest will be paid in cash: (a) Those, in whose case, it is not obligatory to maintain Provident Fund Account. (b)Part Time Teachers who do not have Provident Fund Account. (c)Those who have retired between 01.07.2014 and 31.03.2018. (d) Those who have opted not to subscribe to the Provident Fund Account during the last one year of their service prior to retirement. (6) In the case of employees who retired after 01.07.2014 and are re-employed in the Government service with fixation of pay under Rule 100 Part III KSRs and draw salary from the Consolidated Fund of the State as on the date scheduled for disbursement of pay revision arrears as provided in the G.O read as 1st above, the third instalment of arrears on pay revision will also be disbursed in cash from the office where the employees are working now as directed in the Circular read as 6th above. (7) In cases where there is balance amount, if any, payable as first and second instalments of pay revision arrears consequent to retrospective pay change in the pre-revised scale after the crediting of the first and second instalment of arrears, such amount and the· interest thereon will also be credited to the Provident Fund Account. 3. It has come to the notice of the Government that inord inate delay on the part of some DDOs has occurred in creditin g the fi rst and second instalments of arrear amount of some employees inspite of strict instructions issued vide Circular read as 7th and G.O read as 8th paper above. In order to ensure strict compliance of the Government direction issued therein, it is ordered that a certificate in the following format from the Controlling Officers will be made compulsory for processing salary of every Drawing and Disbursing Officer from the month of May 2018 onwards. The Chief Project Manager, SPARK will make necessary arrangements for the implementation of this direction. CERTIFICATE (Vide G.O.(P)No.50/2018/ Fin dated 26/ 03/2018) This is to certify that the first and second instalment of pay revision arrears of all employees except chose whose arrears could not be processed either due to technical snag in SPARK or due to non-remittance of amount by the foreign employer, under the DDO specified below, has been credited to the Provident Fund Account or paid in cash before 31.12.2017 in terms of Circular No. 55/ 2017/ Fin dated 18.7.2017 and G. O(P)No.128/ 20 17 /Fin dated 06.10.2017. Name of the DDO :

Saturday, April 21 2018

Reckoning prior Central Govt service of Kerala University employees for pensionary benefits

Home » Kerala » You are reading » Reckoning prior Central Govt service of Kerala University employees for pensionary benefits Reckoning prior Central Govt service of Kerala University employees for pensionary benefits GOVERNMENT OF KERALA Reckoning prior Central Government service of University employees for pensionary benefits – Orders issued. FINANCE (PENSION – B) DEPARTMENT G.O.(P) .No.53/ 2018/FIN Dated, Thiruvananthapuram, 30/ 03/ 2018 Ref: 1. G.O (P) No: 703/ 2002/ Fin dated 12.11.2002 2. G.O (P) No: 651/2003/Fin dated 06.12.2003 3. G.O (P) No: 39/2006/Fin dated 23.01.2006 4. G.O (P) No: 212/2009/Fin dated 03.06.2009 5. G.O (P) No: 608/2010/Fin dated 22.11.2010 6. Representation dated 20.06.2017 received from the Association of Calicut University Teachers ORDER Government vide orders read 1st and 2nd above, have ordered that employees of State Government Departments who left their former service in Central Government / Central Public Sector Undertakings on their own volition for taking up appointments in State Government Departments will be allowed to reckon their prior service for all pensionary benefits along with the service in State Government Departments. Amendment to note 2 under rule 11 Part III KSR has been made by order read 3rd above. As per order read 4th above it was ordered that only the prior service in Central Government shall be reckoned as qualifying service for pensionary benefits and prior service in Central Public Sector Undertakings shall not be reckoned for pensionary benefits. Accordingly amendment to note 2 under rule 11 Part III KSRs has been made by order read 5th above. 2. Association of Calicut University Teachers in their representation read 6th above requested to modify the order read 1st above to the extend that employees of the Universities who left their former service in Central Government/ Central Autonomous Bodies on their own volition be allowed to reckon their prior service for pensionary benefits. 3. Government have examilned; the matter in detail, reckoning of service rendered by State Governmentemployees In Central Autonomous Bodies/ Central Public Sector Unertakings was revoked as per order read 4th above. Accordingly, Government are pleased to order that prior Central Government service rendered before 01.01.2004, by the employees of the Universities in Kerala shall be reckoned as qualifying service for pensionary benefits as approved in the case of State Government employees. However, prior service rendered by the employees of the Universities in Kerala in Central Autonomous Bodies/ Central Public Sector Undertakings shall not be reckoned as qualifying service for pensionary benefits. 4. All Universities in Kerala State shall make suitable amendments to their statutes accordingly. By order of the Governor DR. SHARMILA MARY JOSEPH lAS Secretary Finance (Expenditure) http://www.stategovernmentnews.in/reckoning-prior-central-govt-service-of-kerala-university-employees-for-pensionary-benefits/ 2018-04-21T10:55:37+00:00 admin Kerala Calicut University Teachers,Central Govt service,Government of Kerala,Kerala Government Employees,Kerala State Government News,Kerala University employees,University employees pensionary benefits,University pension employees Reckoning prior Central Govt service of Kerala University employees for pensionary benefits GOVERNMENT OF KERALA Abstract Reckoning prior Central Government service of University employees for pensionary benefits - Orders issued. FINANCE (PENSION - B) DEPARTMENT G.O.(P) .No.53/ 2018/FIN Dated, Thiruvananthapuram, 30/ 03/ 2018 Ref: 1. G.O (P) No: 703/ 2002/ Fin dated 12.11.2002 2. G.O (P)... admin [email protected] Administrator State Government Employees News

Saturday, April 21 2018

Revision of pension and other related benefits consequent on Revision of Pay scales from 01/07/2014

Home » Kerala » You are reading » Revision of pension and other related benefits consequent on Revision of Pay scales from 01/07/2014 Revision of pension and other related benefits consequent on Revision of Pay scales from 01/07/2014 – Modification GOVERNMENT OF KERALA Abstract Pension Revision of pension and other related benefits consequent on Revision of pay scales from 01-07-2014 – Modification – Orders Issued. FINANCE (PENSION – B) DEPARTMENT I. G.O.(p) No. 9/2016/Fin dated 20.01.2016 2. G.O.(P) No. 45/2016/Fin dated 02.04.2016 3. Letter No.PM/2/6-44/Ref-6/1 6-17/414489/935 dated 27.12.2016 from Accountant General (A&E) Kerala,Thiruvananthapuram. ORDER Government vide order read 1 at above, have issued orders revising the pension and other related benefits of State Service Pensioners and Para 2.3 of the order was modified as per Government Order read 2nd above. Government are now pleased to issue the following modifications to last sentence of Para 2.3 mentioned in the Government order 2nd read above as follows: “The above provision is applicable in respect of whom pre-revised pay forms part of average emoluments consequent on availing Leave Without Allowance upto 4 months during the last ten months of service except those who avail LWA under Appendix XIIA, XII B and XII C” 2. Necessary amendments on Note 10 of Rule 63 of KSRs part-lll shall be issued separately. 3. The Govermnent Orders read above stands modified to the above extent. By order of the Governor DR. SHARMlLA MARY JOSEPH IAS Secretary Finance (Expenditure) http://www.stategovernmentnews.in/revision-of-pension-and-other-related-benefits-consequent-on-revision-of-pay-scales-from-01-07-2014/ 2018-04-21T10:55:01+00:00 admin Kerala Government of Kerala,Kerala Government News,Kerala Government Order,kerala govt pay scales,Kerala State Government News,Pension,Pension Revision,Revision of pay scales Revision of pension and other related benefits consequent on Revision of Pay scales from 01/07/2014 - Modification GOVERNMENT OF KERALA Abstract Pension Revision of pension and other related benefits consequent on Revision of pay scales from 01-07-2014 - Modification - Orders Issued. FINANCE (PENSION - B) DEPARTMENT G.O.(P)No.56/2018/FIN Dated, Thiruvananthapuram, 03/041/2018 Read: - I. G.O.(p) No.... admin [email protected] Administrator State Government Employees News