Technology and Innovation News Updates

This is how you ‘Stencil’ 2D Materials for Next-Gen Electronics

Thursday, November 2 2017

This is how you ‘Stencil’ 2D Materials for Next-Gen Electronics

This is how you ‘Stencil’ 2D Materials for Next-Gen Electronics This is how you ‘Stencil’ 2D Materials for Next-Gen Electronics November 2, 2017 67 Two discoveries could provide a simple and effective way to “stencil” high-quality 2D materials in precise locations and overcome a barrier to their use in next-generation electronics. In 2004, the discovery of a way to isolate a single atomic layer of carbon—graphene —opened a new world of 2D materials with properties not necessarily found in the familiar 3D world. Among these materials are a large group of elements—transition metals—that fall in the middle of the periodic table. When atoms of certain transition metals, for instance, molybdenum, are layered between two layers of atoms from the chalcogenide elements, such as sulfur or selenium, the result is a three-layer sandwich called a transition metal dichalcogenide. TMDs have created tremendous interest among materials scientists because of their potential for new types of electronics, optoelectronics, and computation. “What we have focused on in this paper is the ability to make these materials over large areas of a substrate in precisely the places we want them,” says Joshua Robinson, associate professor of materials science and engineering at Penn State. “These materials are of interest for a variety of next-generation electronics, not necessarily to replace silicon, but to augment current technologies and ultimately to bring new chip functionality to silicon that we never had before.” In order to integrate TMDs with silicon in transistors, chip companies will need to have a method to place the atoms precisely where they are needed. That method has not been available until now. In their 2D Materials paper, Robinson and his group demonstrate, for the first time, a simple method for making precise patterns of two-dimensional materials using techniques familiar to any nanotechnology lab. “It turns out the process is straightforward,” Robinson explains. “We spin photoresist on the sample in the cleanroom, as if we are going to start making a device. It can be any of a number of polymers that are used in nanofabrication. We then expose it to ultraviolet light in the desired areas, and we develop it like a photograph. Where the polymer was exposed to light, it washes away, and we then clean the surface further with standard plasma-etching processes. The 2D materials will only grow in the areas that have been cleaned.” A second simple discovery described in this work that could help advance the field of TMD research involves overcoming the strong effect a substrate has on the 2D materials grown on top of the substrate. In this case, molybdenum disulfide, a highly studied semiconductor TMD, grew on a sapphire substrate using typical powder-based deposition techniques. This resulted in the properties of the sapphire/molybdenum disulfide interface controlling the desired properties of the molybdenum disulfide, making it unsuitable for device fabrication. “We needed to decouple the effects of the substrate on the 2D layer without transferring the layers of the sapphire,” says Robinson, “and so we simply tried dunking the as-grown material into liquid nitrogen and pulling it out into the air to ‘crack’ the interface. It turned out that was enough to separate the molybdenum disulfide from the sapphire and get closer to the intrinsic performance of the molybdenum disulfide.” The process is gentle enough to weaken the bonds connecting the 2D material to the substrate without completely setting it free. The exact mechanism for loosening the bonds is still under investigation, because of the complexity of this “simple process,” says Robinson. The two materials shrink at different rates, which could cause them to pop apart, but it could also be due to the bubbling of the liquid nitrogen as it turns into gas, or even contact with water vapor in the air that forms ice on the sample. “We’re still working on understanding the exact mechanism, but we know that it works really well, at least with molybdenum disulfide,” Robinson says. Robinson is co-director of the Center for Atomically Thin Multifunctional Coatings and the Center for Two-Dimensional and Layered Materials, and director of user programs for the Penn State 2D Crystal Consortium, all part of the Penn State Materials Research Institute. Support for the work came from the Center for Low Energy Systems Technology, one of six Semiconductor Research STARnet centers of the Semiconductor Research Corporation; the Defense Threat Reduction Agency; and the National Science Foundation.

Light + Building 2018 is About Digital, Reductionist, Refined Lighting for the Modern World

Thursday, November 2 2017

Light + Building 2018 is About Digital, Reductionist, Refined Lighting for the Modern World

Light + Building 2018 is About Digital, Reductionist, Refined Lighting for the... Light + Building 2018 is About Digital, Reductionist, Refined Lighting for the Modern World November 2, 2017 62 The changeover to LEDs over the past few year’s marks one of the biggest ever shifts in the history of lighting design. Because of the gradual introduction of the ban on tungsten lamps, manufacturers and designers have been forced, in a comparatively short time, to adapt their lighting concepts, not only in terms of the technology but in terms of form, too. After a few years of ‘transition’, LEDs have become a well-established standard; and creative new approaches are now emerging from this new perspective on light and lighting that would have been unthinkable up until a few years ago. As a result, designers and manufacturers are no longer focusing so much on the luminaire itself in the design process, but rather, in a smart, experimental and modern way, on what is most important: the light itself. Light over luminaire ‘Form follows function’ – this historical design maxim is gaining new significance in the face of today’s technical possibilities, combined with currents in modern society and design. Whilst, until a few years ago, lighting design was still concerned with devising the most decorative models possible to create sculptural accents in the home, luminaires can now be seen to be receding into the background. Lamps have, in the main, become minimalistic in form and severely reductionist in design, with color and materials adapted to the credo of restraint. Lighting itself, on the other hand, has achieved more powerful effects than ever – through colour, directional streams, and reflections or the creation of artistic shadows. This continues a trend in which the light is no longer directed in streams or from a visible source, but appears as rays at the edges of objects or bathes the lamp itself in various colour sequences. The body of the lamp, be it in the form of a delicate tube, of reflective surfaces built up in a modular fashion or made of transparent glass, serves principally as a ‘housing’ for the technical essentials, as well as a physical component across which light becomes visible in a huge diversity of facets. Interplay of opposites: organic or geometrical The visualisation of light is a trend which will undoubtedly continue in the coming years. Nevertheless, lamps remain, as they have always been, decorative objects, too, and their design a reflection of the times. Rather as in the field of furnishings, lighting design concerns itself with the interplay of opposites: natural materials such as wood, bronze, glass or paper are paired with the latest lighting technology, which is often hidden in a variety of archetypal lamp shapes and types. Quality, naturalness and a pleasant lighting effect are at the forefront of concerns. In what is, actually, only an apparent contrast to this, the trend for formally severe geometry continues. In times, when straight lines and comfort are no longer contradictory but are combined as a matter of course, reductionist, geometrically shaped lamps create modern, restrained accents in living spaces. Always with an additional functionality: digital and flexible The digital society of the future will make new demands on light and lighting: flexibility, individuality and digital control are equally relevant to lamp design. As a result, there are already a large number of lamp types that are integrated into the building-automation system or can be controlled via an app. Whether they are digitally networked or a stand-alone solution: their design, that key factor for success, is increasingly determined by additional functionality. There are hardly any lamps now that do not offer some unique ‘benefit’: some are digitally networked, others provide coloured light; some are sophisticated constructions with weights that keep the lamp balanced; there are those with touch sensitivity or a charging function; others offer a high degree of flexibility through individually movable modules; and there are handy little rechargeable lamps, that provide spontaneous lighting anywhere. An exciting future This modern use of the interplay of light, its reflections and the shadows it casts, and the use of translucent materials and experimental lighting are still all just in their infancy. Designers and technicians are increasingly involved in the development of organic lighting diodes (abbreviated to OLED) and also in the use of light as a medium for digital applications and data transmission. The society of the future will depend increasingly on a digital lifestyle and, as is already the case with the smartphone today, the technical complexity in lamp design will become increasingly invisible. What matters first and foremost is functionality, the impact of the lighting and self-explanatory individuality in use. We have, therefore, an exciting time ahead of us – for in the process of this development, the role of design will, increasingly, be to respond appropriately to people’s emotional need for comfort, creativity, and aesthetics. And Light + Building 2018, too, will be focussing on presenting the latest design trends in the lighting market. The spectrum of products at the world’s leading trade fair in its field covers, amongst other things, designer lamps in a whole range of styles, technical luminaires and lamps of all sorts and kinds and for all applications, together with a large selection of technical lighting components and accessories, and including outside and street lighting. They are all to be found in halls one (Trendspot Design) to six and ten, as well as in the Forum. The exhibitors’ design excellence and expertise will be on display in Frankfurt am Main from 18 to 23 March 2018.

Will Atomic Scale Moiré Patterns Push Electronic Boundaries

Thursday, November 2 2017

Will Atomic Scale Moiré Patterns Push Electronic Boundaries

Will Atomic Scale Moiré Patterns Push Electronic Boundaries Will Atomic Scale Moiré Patterns Push Electronic Boundaries November 2, 2017 33 Moiré patterns occur on displays when the pixelation is at almost the same scale as a photographed pattern or when two thin layers of a material with a periodic structure – like sheer fabrics – are placed on top of each other slightly askew. At the macro scale, Moirés are optical phenomena that do not form tangible objects. However, researchers at the University of Illinois say that when these patterns occur at the atomic level, arrangements of electrons are locked into place by atomic forces to form nanoscale wires capable of transmitting electricity. For decades, the team said, physicists have observed microscope images of atomic arrangements of 2D thin films and recognized them as dislocations. But Professor Harley Johnson’s group is the first to note that these are also common Moiré patterns. Prof Johnson said: “2D materials – thin films engineered to be of single-atom thickness – create Moiré patterns when stacked on top of each other and are skewed, stretched, compressed or twisted. The Moiré emerges as atoms form linear areas of high electron density. The resulting lines create what is essentially an extremely thin wire.” By manipulating the orientation of stacked layers of 2D thin films, such as graphene, wires of single-atom thickness can be assembled, building the foundation to write nanocircuitry. This has the potential to produce the quickest transmitting wires and circuits possible, the researchers said. “There is always the question of how to connect to a circuit that small,” Prof Johnson continued. “There is still a lot of work to be done in finding ways to stitch together 2D materials in a way that could produce a device.” In the meantime, Prof Johnson’s group is focusing on types of devices that can be made using moire engineering. “Being able to engineer the Moiré pattern itself is a path to new lightweight and less-intrusive devices that could have applications in the biomedical and space industries,” he concluded. “The possibilities are limited only by the imagination of engineers.”

Renesas’s ‘New Energy Vehicle Solution Center’ to Drive Chinese New Energy Vehicle Market

Thursday, November 2 2017

Renesas’s ‘New Energy Vehicle Solution Center’ to Drive Chinese New Energy Vehicle Market

Renesas’s ‘New Energy Vehicle Solution Center’ to Drive Chinese New Energy Vehicle... Renesas’s ‘New Energy Vehicle Solution Center’ to Drive Chinese New Energy Vehicle Market November 2, 2017 45 Renesas Electronics Corporation, a premier supplier of advanced semiconductor solutions, on October 31, 2017, announced it will establish a “New Energy Vehicle Solution Center” on November 1, 2017, directly under the China Business Unit to accelerate engagement with the Chinese new energy vehicle (NEV) market. With the announcements by the governments of Britain and France of policies aimed at prohibiting the manufacture and sale of gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles by 2040, the trend away from gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles and toward electric vehicles (EVs), and plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHVs) is gathering pace. China has positioned EVs, PHVs, and fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) as “NEVs” and considers this sector to be a strategic national industry. The Chinese government has announced a policy aimed at expanding production and sales of new energy vehicles to 2 million units annually by 2020 and increasing the share of total automobiles produced and sold accounted for by new energy vehicles to more than 20 percent by 2025. To accelerate this effort and to expand the transition into NEV, the Chinese government has also announced its plan to implement a credit-score program from 2018, which make carmakers that manufacture or import NEVs obliged to obtain a NEV score, which is linked to the average amount of fuel consumption and the proportion of the number of NEVs they import. Under these regulations, China is expected to drive the adoption of NEVs worldwide. Renesas recognizes that China is now the world’s largest market for new energy vehicles and an advanced market for new energy vehicle development. As such, Renesas will establish the new organization in order to actively engage in local innovation and market opportunities and to reflect these insights in the planning and development of solutions as well as the formulation and implementation of plans for cultivating new business. The new organization will work in an agile, flexible manner to advance Renesas’ efforts in the Chinese market and will operate directly under the China Business Unit, which was set up in March 2017 with the aim of unifying in a single business unit sales, marketing, design and development, and manufacturing functions for the Chinese market. In November 2015 Renesas announced a strategic partnership with National Electric Vehicle Sweden (NEVS), a Swedish company in which the Chinese government holds a majority investment, and in May 2017 Renesas announced a strategic partnership with Great Wall Motors, China’s largest manufacturer of SUVs and pick-up trucks. The new organization will play a key role in promoting these strategic partnerships, thereby accelerating the development of solutions for the Chinese new energy vehicle market and contributing to the expansion of the market overall. Outline of New Organization Name: New Energy Vehicle Solution Center Center Director: Tomoru Sato (President, Renesas Semiconductor Design (Beijing) Co., Ltd.) Business activities: Development of semiconductor solutions for use in new energy vehicles for China

Renesas Electronics Expands 3D Graphics Cluster Market to Entry-Class Cars with R-Car D3 System-on-Chip

Thursday, November 2 2017

Renesas Electronics Expands 3D Graphics Cluster Market to Entry-Class Cars with R-Car D3 System-on-Chip

Renesas Electronics Expands 3D Graphics Cluster Market to Entry-Class Cars with R-Car... Renesas Electronics Expands 3D Graphics Cluster Market to Entry-Class Cars with R-Car D3 System-on-Chip R-Car D3 Delivers High-Performance Graphic Capabilities and Significantly Reduced System Development Cost, and Enables Scalability from High-End to Entry-Class Vehicles November 2, 2017 47 Renesas Electronics Corporation, a premier supplier of advanced semiconductor solutions, on October 31, 2017, announced its high-performance R-Car D3 automotive infotainment system system-on-chip (SoC), designed to expand the use of 3D graphics instrument clusters (3D clusters) that support 3D graphics displays in entry-class cars. The R-Car D3 achieves both high-performance graphic capabilities and contributes to significant reduction in overall system development cost. The new SoC includes a high-performance 3D graphics core that enables a high-quality 3D display and lower system costs equivalent to the bill of materials (BOM) costs of developing with 2D graphics instrument clusters (2D clusters). By adopting the R-Car D3, system developers can re-use their 3D graphics development assets, including software and graphics designs from high-end vehicles that adopt high-performance R-Car H3 or R-Car M3 SoCs to entry-level cars. This scalability enables development of easy-to-use and high visibility entry cluster 3D graphics at approximately the same level cost as the existing 2D clusters. In addition, Renesas collaborates with industry-leading partners in the instrument cluster field to further reduce development steps and costs. “Full graphics cluster systems equipped with a large thin filter transistor panel are expected to become mainstream for future vehicles, which will require high-definition 3D graphics display at a high speed to accurately convey information to the driver,” said Toshiaki Ichihashi, Managing Officer, Engineering Headquarters, Nippon Seiki Co., Ltd. “We are excited that the R-Car D3 will respond to this need as well as reduce BOM costs.” “For more than a decade, automotive OEMs and Tier 1s have relied on BlackBerry QNX® to deliver world-class software solutions for infotainment, telematics, and instrument cluster systems,” said Grant Courville, senior director of product management at BlackBerry QNX. “The combination of the new R-Car D3 SoC and BlackBerry’s ISO 26262 ASIL B-certified QNX Platform for Instrument Clusters will enable our customers to confidently deliver state-of-the-art, safety-certified digital clusters rapidly to the market.” “The safe and secure INTEGRITYreal-time operating system is widely used for automotive in-vehicle infotainment and instrument clusters in productions programs around the globe. Our support for the R-Car D3 builds on years of successful partnership with Renesas and their other R-Car devices, providing the customer with certified automotive safety, time-saving development tools, and optional virtualization for Linux” said Matt Slager, Director of Asia-Pacific Business Development at Green Hills Software. “We see this third-generation R-Car D3 as a valuable addition to the R-Car Family of SoCs, enabling customers to easily migrate and reuse existing R-Car and INTEGRITY software assets for faster time to market for their next-generation integrated cockpit designs.” “For practical implementation of autonomous driving, the instrument cluster needs to instantly, accurately, and safely report a wide variety of information to the driver. The Renesas R-Car D3, which provides powerful graphics capabilities and critical functional safety features for instrument clusters, is expected to revolutionize the 3D cluster user experience,” said Lynwood Stanley, Vice President of Global Engineering Services at Altia. “Altia is using our DeepScreen code generator, which optimizes the HMI code, for the Renesas R-Car with the goal to deliver the highest-performance embedded HMIs to the market.” “For instrument clusters based on large-scale LCD displays, the market is expected to grow rapidly in the future, and it would be a great benefit to the customer to be able to implement such instrument clusters at a low BOM cost,” said Rock Yang, Vice President at Thundersoft. “As one of the leading provider of UI/UE and OS technology, we at Thundersoft provide both software system integration and our HMI tool “Kanzi” for the R-Car including the new R-Car D3. We believe we can work with Renesas to drive the R-Car solutions market.” The increasing number of connections between the instrument cluster and the various sensors and control devices allows more information about the vehicle and its surroundings to be captured and displayed on the instrument cluster. However, this increases the need for improved visibility from a safety point of view. Currently, entry-class vehicles feature mostly 7- to 10-inch liquid crystal displays (LCDs) that support mainly 2D graphics. In the future, advancements in automotive LCDs size, resolution, and prices will support an anticipated explosive demand in 3D clusters to meet the growing need for clearer and highly visible designs on a large screen, particularly in the Chinese market. In the meantime, system developers working with automotive instrument clusters must manage an increasing number of development steps and costs, as 3D clusters for entry-class cars are required to meet both the strict cost and high-performance as existing 2D clusters but with 3D graphics drawing requirements. Renesas developed the R-Car D3 with these functions and performance capabilities in mind, offering developers a reliable, robust 3D clusters solution that is scalable from entry-level to high-end vehicles. Key features of the R-Car D3 High-performance 3D graphics core that enables high-quality 3D display and lower system costs equivalent to that of 2D cluster development The new SoC includes a 3D graphics core that enables high-performance human-machine interface (HMI) and realizes significantly reduced system development cost equivalent to those of existing 2D cluster systems. 3D graphics core that enables high-performance HMI Leveraging one of the latest graphics cores from Imagination Technologies, Inc, the Power VR Series 8XE, the R-Car D3 achieves approximately six times improved drawing performance compared to the existing 3D graphics R-Car D1 SoC. This allows system developers to reuse content created for high-end cars in entry class cars, system designers who had previously been concerned about hardware graphics performance limitations can now create graphics content without concern or limitations. Reduced system costs by approximately 40 percent compared to existing Renesas devices The R-Car D3 adopts the ball grid array (BGA) package, which simplifies the use of printed circuit boards (PCBs). This allows system developers to create 3D clusters using low-cost, four-layer PCBs, reducing the system BOM costs. The Renesas R-Car D3 reference boards, also use four-layer PCBs, and Renesas provides the design data as reference data for system developers to simplify the design of their own systems. In addition, since the new SoC achieves industry-leading level of low power consumption, developers can configure a power supply circuit using a relatively inexpensive discrete power supply regulator. Since a cluster system can be configured with one DDR SDRAM, it is possible to reduce BOM cost by approximately 40 percent compared with 3D cluster systems that include the existing R-Car D1, realizing the total system development cost equivalent to the existing 2D cluster. The automatic memory calibration function of the DDR SDRAM, which is standard in R-Car SoCs, eliminates the need for timing adjustment of data transfer with the SRAM and memory evaluation man-hours requirements. Robust partner ecosystem to streamline development steps Renesas works with several operating system (OS) manufacturers, HMI manufacturers, and system integrators who are leading the instrument cluster field. System developers can take advantage of a wide range of automotive solutions by working with the more than 200 Renesas R-Car Consortium partner companies to further reduce the number of development steps and cost for 3D graphics. In addition, the R-Car D3 uses open GL ES 3.1 for 3D graphics drawing, which enables scalability with third-generation R-Car devices. Furthermore, the new SoC uses the same 2D graphics core as the RH850/D1M microcontroller (MCU) for 2D graphics applications. This assures that users will be able to reuse all their software assets and design content assets development from applications ranging from 2D clusters to high-end 3D clusters. As part of the third-generation R-Car SoC Family, the R-Car D3 supports the ISO 26262 (ASIL-B) automotive functional safety standard, and provides a functional safety support program for implementing safe driving support systems, contributing to the realization of a safe driving experience. Availability Samples of the R-Car D3 are available now. Mass production is scheduled to begin in September 2019 and is expected to reach a volume of 200,000 units per month in September 2020. (Availability is subject to change without notice.)

congatec brings German Industry 4.0 expertise to China

Thursday, November 2 2017

congatec brings German Industry 4.0 expertise to China

congatec brings German Industry 4.0 expertise to China congatec brings German Industry 4.0 expertise to China congatec presents smart manufacturing IT platforms for ‘Made in China 2025’ solutions at CIIF November 2, 2017 63 The Taiwan located subsidiary of congatec – a leading technology company for embedded computer modules, single board computers and embedded design and manufacturing services – is presenting smart manufacturing IT platforms for ‘Made in China 2025’ (MIC 2025) solutions at CIIF, China International Industry Fair (Hall 6.1H, Booth A065) in Shanghai. These instantly deployable computing platforms enable Chinese machine building and manufacturing systems engineers to develop smart, connected manufacturing equipment as well as robotics and intra-logistics devices with situational awareness for collaborative manufacturing. The new congatec MIC 2025 platforms are based on embedded motherboards and single board computers as well as Computer/Server-on-Modules, leveraging open standards that are freely accessible all over the world. With congatec acting as a fabless platform vendor, they can facilitate any logistical requirements for Chinese customers wishing to export their MIC 2025 manufacturing solutions globally. The showcased congatec MIC 2025 computer platforms feature all required interface functionalities and software support for smart connected manufacturing systems – including IIoT based machine control and monitoring as well as maintenance clouds. “congatec brings its German Industry 4.0 and IIoT expertise to the Chinese market with the extensive open standards based MIC 2025 computer platforms. This will help the Chinese economy reach the ‘Made in China 2025’ goals while at the same time fueling our own growth strategies, as high-quality production requires smart manufacturing capabilities and our open standards based embedded computing technologies offer the fundamental building blocks for this intelligence”, explains Becky Lin, Sales Director at congatec China. “We have FAEs and partners in all major economic regions such as Beijing, Shanghai, Shenzhen and Chengdu that are experienced in our IIoT and German Industry 4.0 technology. With the additional support of our experts in Taiwan and the German headquarters, we can competently address all major questions and service demands from local machine building and manufacturing systems engineers.” One of the various MIC 2025 demonstrations at CIIF includes a presentation featuring virtualized COM Express Type 7 Computer-on-Modules based on the new Intel Atom C3000 platform (code name Denverton) and focusing on the real-time capabilities of virtualized industrial server platforms. The installation is tailored for industrial and carrier-grade cloud, edge and fog servers as well as smart real-time controls, robotics and manufacturing cells that need a virtualized environment to cater for various tasks in parallel. Examples are deterministic, hard real-time machine control; IIoT and cloud connectivity; and horizontal real-time communication in Industry 4.0 environments. Additional presentations include multifunctional gateway technologies for smart sensor networks which offer all the fundamental gateway logic off-the-shelf and based on open standard initiatives. The goal is to reduce the engineering effort for the manifold tasks of smart manufacturing gateways, such as converting and analyzing local sensor data, as well as decision making and communication in all vertical and horizontal directions. This presentation is based on congatec’s conga-IoT Gateway and Cloud API for IoT Gateways that has been designed to set the foundation of a standard for building a vendor independent ecosystem for IoT gateway logic within the specifications of the Standardization Group for Embedded Technologies (SGET). TAGS

Ransomware School: Learn Lessons From How Others Fail

Thursday, November 2 2017

Ransomware School: Learn Lessons From How Others Fail

Ransomware , Risk Management , Technology Ransomware School: Learn Lessons From How Others Fail David Stubley of 7 Elements on Identifying Initial Intrusions to Block Repeat Attacks Mathew J. Schwartz ( euroinfosec ) • November 2, 2017 Get Permission David Stubley, CEO, 7 Elements "Are we vulnerable to the attacks that are being reported in the media?" All CEOs and boards of directors should be asking that question of their CISO and internal information security team to ensure they don't suffer the same fate - especially when it comes to ransomware outbreaks, says David Stubley of the consultancy 7 Elements. See Also: How to Scale Your Vendor Risk Management Program All organizations should review recent high-profile attacks to see if they run the same technology as the targeted organizations and ask if attackers did breach their organization, could they access sensitive, unencrypted data, Stubley says (see Disaster Strikes: Here's Your Incident Response Playbook ). In an interview at Information Security Media Group's recent 2017 London Fraud and Breach Prevention Summit , Stubley discusses: Questions CEOs should be asking in light of the latest high-profile attacks; The importance of ascertaining as quickly as possible how attackers infiltrated an organization; How ransomware is often the last phase of a longer intrusion; Attackers' penchant for re-infecting organizations that pay ransoms to demand further payoffs. Stubley is the founder and CEO of 7 Elements, based in Edinburgh, Scotland. He was previously manager of penetration testing services for Royal Bank of Scotland, and he served as a penetration testing project manager for Britain's Ministry of Defense as well as an IP technical security engineer for MCI WorldCom.

10 Facebook coined terms that changed English language forever

Thursday, November 2 2017

10 Facebook coined terms that changed English language forever

10 Facebook coined terms that changed English language forever www.techgig.com | techgig.com Nov 2, 2017, 06.31 PM IST Social media Image Credit Continue reading Long before Facebook made its way into our lives, nobody would even imagine that we could 'friend' or 'unfriend' somebody according to our whims and fancies. We would often share our books or CDs with our friends but we would never 'share' intimate tidbits of our daily lives, such as the time we got up from bed or the moment we felt hungry, with people we've barely known or interacted with. No one can deny the role social media plays to influence our lives; that includes the way we make our daily conversations. Since its birth in 2004, Facebook has incorporated several terms and phrases that have become an inseparable part of our daily lexicon. Most of these are common words but were refitted to give new meanings. Some of them were forgotten but a few have stuck on, finding a place even in dictionaries. Here are 10 such terms that Facebook coined to change way we look at the English language today. Friend In the real world, you may have just a friend or two with whom you share your joys and sorrows on a regular basis, but on Facebook, it's not uncommon to have 683 or 1,024 'friends'. After all, you just 'search' for an acquaintance's name so that you can 'add' him or her and hoard them like poker chips. No problem if he or she is a rarely seen co-worker, a distant relative or a vaguely remembered student from school. It's cool to have lots of 'friends'. Unfriend Okay, so if you have 1,024 'friends' on Facebook, you are also bound to have people who annoy you or whom you simply get tired of. What do you do then? You 'unfriend' him. By adding an 'unfriend' option, Facebook created new shorthand for aborting a friendship or an acquaintance. Isn't it easier to say 'I unfriended Vipul' than 'I'm not going to be friends with Vipul anymore because he irritates me with his daily comments about politics'? No wonder, 'unfriend' was chosen as the 'Word of the Year' by the New Oxford English Dictionary in 2009. Status Before Facebook happened, you would measure a person's social or professional standing by his or her 'status'. Today, your friend's 'status' gives you updates about their thoughts or activities, like how he or she is feeling today or which five-star property he or she has checked into. Suddenly, updating one's status meant more than just moving to a posher neighbourhood or buying a luxury car. Like Your 'friend' has 'posted' a new photo or 'status' and you want to endorse it. No problem, just 'like' it. Do you more than 'like' it? No problem there either, just 'react' to it, whether you 'love' it or find it 'wow'. Since the 'like' button debuted on Facebook in 2009, it has been the subject of much discussion with critics even asking for a 'dislike' button to protest the social networking site's forced cheerfulness. Although this demand was never met, in 2016 however, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg somehow seemed to finally concede that every post cannot be likable by introducing five new 'reactions' as an extension to the 'like' button. Today, the 'like' feature is not just taken as a tool but also as a barometer of one's popularity. So how many 'likes' have you got so far? Share Back in the pre-Facebook era, when our friends wanted to listen to some music that they didn't have, we would share our CDs. Then came Facebook, and we started 'sharing' almost everything under the sun. We did that even we were not too generous. Found somebody's post funny, share it. Read an interesting article, share it. We just had to 'share' it, with everyone and right now! Wall Earlier, we would be discouraged to write or scribble on somebody's boundary wall, but on Facebook, we are not only encouraged but are actually tempted to check on the 'wall' to see what's happening in the world. Although it never really caught on (in 2011, Facebook replaced the Wall with the current Timeline format, which displays updates chronologically), it brought in a new wave of social networking. Comment Earlier, you would comment on any issue or political statement that you felt strongly about. Today, you can do that on almost anything, whether it's your friend's photo or a birthday wish. On Facebook, you can do even with GIFs or on colourful backgrounds. Time to get expressive, isn't it? It's complicated You were 'single' or married, but Facebook gave a new outlet to your predicament if you didn't fall into any of the two statuses. The ambiguous answer 'It's complicated' to Facebook's 'What's your relationship status?' has now become an inseparable part of pop culture, so much so that it inspired a 2009 Hollywood romantic comedy with Meryl Streep. Poke Although this feature is not much used these days, it raised quite a few eyebrows in its early days. Nobody, including Mark Zuckerberg (he thought it would be cool to have a feature without any specific purpose), knew what it was for; some saw it as a flirty invitation to an online chat or a real-world dating adventure. But amazingly, you can still 'poke' somebody on Facebook. Tag Your 'friend' appears in one of the photos or updates that you've posted on Facebook; just 'tag' him or her. If he or she doesn't, well, never mind; you can still 'tag' him or her. After all, you want more people to notice your posts, don't you, even at the cost of being labelled as 'irritating'? Maybe 'tag' is the new way to 'poke'.

Four Operators, A Good Number For India: Sundararajan

Thursday, November 2 2017

Four Operators, A Good Number For India: Sundararajan

“Out of the one-lakh gram panchayats, 83,000 are connected with fibre and electronic equipment are up at the block levels. All the one-lakh villages will be ready by December 31. The service delivery will also start, for which, we have announced BharatNet tariff that is incidentally one-fourth of the average commercial tariff,” said Telecom Secretary, Aruna Sundararajan. Sundararajan, who is also heading the mass project — BharatNet – for connecting all the villages in the country and digitise them to give benefits, in an interview with BusinessLine shared more details on other projects such as Wi-Fi hotspots in villages and how data are going to be a major monetising driving force for the companies. Excerpts: What is the status of the BharatNet project? Is the first phase going to meet the December deadline? Out of the one-lakh gram panchayats, 83,000 are connected with fibre and electronic equipment are up at the block levels. All the one-lakh villages will be ready by December 31. The service delivery will also start, for which, we have announced BharatNet tariff that is incidentally one-fourth of the average commercial tariff. Now, all the service providers have started figuring out which areas they want to deliver services. Services will be delivered in three ways – aerial fibre to the homes (fibre to home); through the telecom towers (by the TSPs), and Wi-Fi hotspots, for which we are putting a separate tender for pan India. The tender will be out hopefully before November 10. Wi-Fi is the main distribution line. We expect that five-lakh Wi-Fi hotspots will be operational by December 2018. So, even though we would not have completed the phase-II of the BharatNet in the rest 1.50 lakh gram panchayats by March 2019, Wi-Fi will still be available for accessing internet and mobile broadband in all the 2.50 lakh gram panchayats. So, we are not actually expecting 2.50 lakh gram panchayats, but somewhere around 5-6 lakh Wi-Fi hotspots pan India by December next year. We have around 38,000 Wi-Fi hotspots already in the country. The budget already sanctioned for this project is Rs 3,600 crore. DoT had issued mobile virtual network operator (MVNO) policy. What is the status? How many MVNOs have been launched so far? We have launched MVNO on May 31, 2016. Presently, we have 106 MVNO licences. There are provisions, but they have to work out and see which TSP they are partnering with. With only few operators left do you think MVNO makes sense? India is a huge market for data and we have still not tapped even a few. Even now, our internet penetration in rural areas is fairly modest. There is a huge scope for growth even in urban areas. Everything is going to be on the internet. What you are seeing now is a dynamic mark, so this is going to play out something which you and I cannot foresee today. The bigger question is how to monetise data while talking about data protection/ privacy, etc. What is your comment? Increasingly, whether we like it or not, we are going to see the monetisation of data and that is why we said data is the new oil/ asset. It will be monetised in different ways and indirectly. For example, the social media platforms, they do not have a direct model of monetisation, while there are others who have. This is an emerging space and there will be a set of completely new platforms and players who will emerge on the content side. Everybody will not monetise in the same way so they cannot be regulated on similar models. For instance, the open data policy states that there are certain data which the government wants to make available to people to derive value – as long as it is not infringing privacy. The IMG has said that the reserve price of spectrum should follow international best practices. Will DoT agree to them? The IMG has concluded that there is an interim liquidity stress. Based on representations from the Finance Ministry, banking industry, and others they had done an analysis. They believe this is only an interim and not a long-term permanent phenomenon. The second thing they had said was that although there had been deep erosion in revenues, they were already observing an upward trend in the industry in the revenues of the TSPs. So, we will have to continue to watch the situations. As far as spectrum is concerned, often people say about the high-price perspective. But, it is the TSPs who have clearly driven the prices of spectrum to that level. Now, going forward, what kind of spectrum should be made available for 5G, for the future requirements, etc, in the context of the national telecom policy (NTP), we will take a call keeping in view the recommendations of TRAI, IMG, and others. So, in the NTP, we will be taking a detailed decision. Number of operators are exiting or shutting down, people are losing jobs, and there are only three-four viable operators in the sector. Is this a desirable situation? Will government look at giving new licences to increase competition? I think four players is a good number we have for a market like India. And, there will be other kinds of niche players who would come. For example, has already said that they are going to focus on data services. A lot more specialisation, niche players will start emerging in the market because India is a large market and you cannot really have ‘one size fits all’ kind of service delivery. This is a highly evolving field and it would be premature to say that this is exactly how Indian telecom market and industry will evolve. TRAI already has given a lot of recommendations on the cloud, opening up of internet telephony and all that. So, we will have to continue to evolve and the regulations will continue have to evolve to pace with that. Telecom service providers have been demanding for reduction in levies. Will the government agree? I do not really know what kind of recommendations will come from telecom policy and the stakeholders. Let’s wait and see for it. – The Hindu Business Line Twitter

Police: DDoS Provider Targeted Google, Pokemon, Skype

Thursday, November 2 2017

Police: DDoS Provider Targeted Google, Pokemon, Skype

Police: DDoS Provider Targeted Google, Pokemon, Skype British Man Charged With DDoS Disruptions, Selling Malware and 'Crypters' The Birmingham Magistrates' Court in Birmingham, England. (Photo: Elliott Brown via Flickr/CC) A 21-year-old man appeared in British court this week to face charges related to a number of cybercrime offenses, including helping to disrupt high-profile websites. See Also: Effective Cyber Threat Hunting Requires an Actor and Incident Centric Approach Alex Bessell, from Liverpool, England, was accused of earning more than $700,000 (£530,000) since 2011 by selling malware as well as "crypters" that are designed to repack malware to better evade anti-virus software scanners. Bessell has also been accused of infecting and controlling more than 9,000 "zombie" PCs and using them "to orchestrate distributed denial-of-service attacks on firms like Skype, Pokemon and Google in an attempt to crash their online operations," according to police. After he appeared in court on Monday, a judge ruled that Bessell's case would be transferred to crown court, where he's due to appear later this month. In England, most cases begin in magistrates' court, but more serious cases often get transferred to crown court. DDoS Charges Bessell faces 11 charges, including unauthorized access to computers, impairing the operation of computers, making and supplying malware and money laundering, law enforcement officials say. The charges were filed following an investigation conducted by cybercrime detectives at the Regional Organized Crime Unit, or ROCU, for England's West Midlands region, based in Birmingham. While the list of charges against Bessell released by police do not explicitly accuse him of functioning as a DDoS-as-a-service provider, that is often how DDoS disruption capabilities get monetized (see FBI to DDoS Victims: Please Come Forward ). Web Business: Aiobuy Police say Bessell has also been accused of "setting up the web business 'Aiobuy'" as well as making false statements to Companies House, which is the United Kingdom's registrar of companies. On March 20, 2015, Bessell incorporated "Aiobuy" via Companies House. But after receiving a warning in June 2016, the company was dissolved in August 2016 via a "compulsory strike-off." Unlike a voluntary strike-off, in which a company's directors typically will apply to Companies House to close down their company, a compulsory strike-off means it has been initiated by authorities, perhaps because a firm has not paid its taxes or other creditors. It's not clear just what services Aiobuy might have offered or if the firm helped Bessell amass his alleged earnings. But in March 2015, a new user with the handle "AlexTM" announced to the Bitcoin Forum site's project development section the launch of "an autobuy service called aio-buy" at the "aiobuy.net" domain. Post on March 15, 2011, by "AlexTM" to Bitcoin Forum announcing the launch of "an autobuy service called aio-buy." "What this website does is allow you to sell your product, no matter what it is. We enable you to sell files that will be sent to the customer after he has made his purchase, .netseal programs that will also be sold automatically, the code and download link will be sent to the client after he purchases. We also allow you to sell your codes, [so] once the customer purchases he gets sent one of the codes or logins you have added to my system," AlexTM posted. On May 29, 2015, meanwhile, a user with the handle "AlexTM" posted to a hacker-focused social network called Hack Forums announcing that an instant payment notification feature had been added to Aiobuy (see 13 Scenes from an Irish Cybercrime Conference ). Hack Forums post by "AlexTM" on May 29, 2015, announcing the addition of an instant payment notification feature to Aiobuy. In a potential clue as to the money laundering charges filed against Bessell, by May 2016, AlexTM claimed to have processed more than $5 million in transactions via the Bitcoin Forum. AlexTM claimed in a Bitcoin Forum post on May 17, 2016, to have processed more than $5 million in transactions via the AIO-Buy service. Service: DefensiveServers.com Advertisment for DefenseServers.com posted to Hack Forums. AlexTM's Hack Forums biography also listed "DefensiveServers.com" as being one of his sites. The holder of that domain name's registration has been obscured via a domain-privacy site. But a post to Hack Forums dated Aug. 25, 2015, lists the site as providing shared hosting, VPN and reverse proxies among its services and also lists multiple testimonials. One reads: "Alex is a nice person and I love his services. I defnitely [sic] recommend dealing with him."

How dating apps are revealing your personal data to criminals

Thursday, November 2 2017

How dating apps are revealing your personal data to criminals

How dating apps are revealing your personal data to criminals www.techgig.com | techgig.com Nov 2, 2017, 03.41 PM IST Mobile Technologies Image Credit Continue reading While a large number of youngsters use dating applications to find a date or a friend, a new research cautions about the vulnerability of these applications as they are prone to hacks which can reveal your identity and other crucial personal details. A study conducted by global cyber security company, Kaspersky Lab has revealed that many dating applications do not handle the sensitive data of users with sufficient protection. "That's no reason not to use such services. You simply need to understand the issues and, where possible, minimize the risks," says Kaspersky Lab. Experts also reveal that users share information with others very easily while online dating, with about 25 percent of the users sharing their full name publicly on their profile. The experts analysed nine most popular mobile online dating apps including Tinder, Bumble, OkCupid, Badoo, Mamba, Zoosk, Happn, WeChat, Paktor and revealed the main threats for users. The researchers also identified that four out of nine applications they analysed permit potential criminals to figure out your real identity behind a nickname based on data furnished by users themselves. By using this information cyber criminals can reach your social media accounts to figure out your real names. "We informed the developers in advance about all the vulnerabilities detected and by the time this text was released some had already been fixed and others were slated for correction in the near future. However, not every developer promised to patch all of the flaws," say experts. The experts also found that eight of the nine Android based applications were offering too much information to cyber criminals. Tinder is unsafe "If someone wants to know your whereabouts, six of the nine apps will lend a hand. Only OkCupid, Bumble and Badoo keep user location data under lock and key. All of the other apps indicate the distance between you and the person you're interested in. By moving around and logging data about the distance between the two of you, it's easy to determine the exact location of the 'prey'," warned the researchers. Rimit

Aadhaar is a threat to national security: Subramanian Swamy

Thursday, November 2 2017

Aadhaar is a threat to national security: Subramanian Swamy

Leadership Image Credit Continue reading Subramanian Swamy, the BJP leader is planning to write a PMO explaining how Aadhaar compulsion is a threat to the national security. Swamy believes that SC will soon strike down the Aadhaar system. The department of telecommunication (DoT) is working with UIDAI and telecom operators to publish a comprehensive guideline for linking Aadhaar. Supreme Court recently published an order requiring at the telecoms to verify existing mobile subscribers through Aadhaar-based KYC by February 2018. Customers are facing a lot of challenges due to the mandatory linking of mobile phones with Aadhaar. Cybercrime experts believe that Aadhaar has led to the number of cyber frauds. According to the cyber crime cell, there is a new trend in cybercrime activities. Cybercriminals are using Aadhaar card linking scam for to get access to the individual bank accounts. Cybercriminals are mostly targeting the people in mid-to-old age group. The Aadhaar linking scam has been exploited by the fraudsters around the country. These fraudsters pretend to be a representative from a bank and ask the details of the debit card number, passwords, and bank account details. The threat of getting the card deactivated makes the customers share the details with the telecaller. According to the cyber crime cell at Pune police, the department has helped in recovering Rs 60 lakh so far from cases related to Aadhaar fraud. The conviction rate in Aadhaar related cases is very low. On the other hand, UIDAI is still pushing the users to link Aadhaar card with bank accounts and telecom operators. Swamy's tweet comes after the Supreme court's notice on a petition challenging the mandatory linking of Aadhaar. Subramanian Swamy's tweet reads, "I am writing a letter soon to PM detailing how compulsory Aadhar is a threat to our national security. SC will I am sure strike it down." - Rajat Kabade