Technology and Innovation News Updates

Watch हिंदु नेताओं का मुख्य कातिल शार्प शूटर हरदीप सिंह शेरा गिरफ़्तार - News/Politics Video Uploaded by - PunjabKesari TV (video id - 749854)

Saturday, November 11 2017

Watch हिंदु नेताओं का मुख्य कातिल शार्प शूटर हरदीप सिंह शेरा गिरफ़्तार - News/Politics Video Uploaded by - PunjabKesari TV (video id - 749854)

Duration : 02:04 Description: पंजाब में हिंदु नेताओं की हत्या के ज़िम्मेदार दोषियों के ख़िलाफ़ लगातार पंजाब पुलिस का शिकंजा कसता जा रहा है ....पुलिस ने इन हत्यायों में शामिल मुख्य आरोपी शार्प -शूटर हरदीप सिंह शेरा को गिरफ़्तार कर लिया है...इससे पहले पुलिस 4 दोषियों को गिरफ़्तार कर चुकी है जिसके बारे में सी.एम. और डी.जी.पी. द्वारा प्रैस कान्फ़्रेंस करके खुलासा किया गया था तो एक आरोपी की जल्द गिरफ़्तारी होने की बात कही गई थी ...उस मुख्य दोषी शेरा को भी पुलिस ने पकड़ लिया है ।Watch हिंदु नेताओं का मुख्य कातिल शार्प शूटर हरदीप सिंह शेरा गिरफ़्तार With HD Quality

Watch खालिस्तान की हिमायत कर फंसे बडूंगर, अकालियों से भी सवाल ! - News/Politics Video Uploaded by - PunjabKesari TV (video id - 749855)

Saturday, November 11 2017

Watch खालिस्तान की हिमायत कर फंसे बडूंगर, अकालियों से भी सवाल ! - News/Politics Video Uploaded by - PunjabKesari TV (video id - 749855)

Duration : 02:52 Description: एस.जी.पी.सी. प्रधान किरपाल सिंह बडूंगर की तरफ से खालिस्तान के हक में मारे गए नारे ने पंजाब की सियासी आबो-हवा गरमा दी है। खालिस्तान का पक्ष लेने के विरोध में पंजाब कांग्रेस के उप प्रधान राज कुमार वेरका ने बडूंगर सहित अकाली दल पर भी निशाना साधा है।Watch खालिस्तान की हिमायत कर फंसे बडूंगर, अकालियों से भी सवाल ! With HD Quality

Watch Trains में हो रही देरी लोगों के लिए बनी मुसीबत - News/Politics Video Uploaded by - PunjabKesari TV (video id - 749856)

Saturday, November 11 2017

Watch Trains में हो रही देरी लोगों के लिए बनी मुसीबत - News/Politics Video Uploaded by - PunjabKesari TV (video id - 749856)

Duration : 02:07 Description: धुंध के कारण फ़िरोज़पुर रेल यातायात काफ़ी प्रभावित हो रही है। जिस कारण फ़िरोज़पुर मंडल की 118 के करीब गाड़ियां लेट हो रही हैं। जिसके चलते यात्रियों को काफ़ी परेशानी का सामना करना पड़ रहा है। यात्रियों का कहना है कि उन को बहुत समय तक गाड़ियों का इंतज़ार करना पड़ रहा है और साथ ही उन्होंने कहा कि विभाग की तरफ से गाड़ियों में हो रही देरी के बारे सूचित भी नहीं किया जा रहा है।Watch Trains में हो रही देरी लोगों के लिए बनी मुसीबत With HD Quality TAGS:

I'm David Heinemeier Hansson, Basecamp CTO, and This Is How I Work

Wednesday, November 15 2017

I'm David Heinemeier Hansson, Basecamp CTO, and This Is How I Work

I'm David Heinemeier Hansson, Basecamp CTO, and This Is How I Work Nick Douglas, Gawker Media Nov 15, 2017, 11.41 PM The culture of Basecamp , the small company behind top-shelf project management software, is famously productive and unfrazzled. David Heinemeier Hansson, aka DHH, is the developer behind Basecamp's eponymous flagship product. He's also the creator of Ruby on Rails , the framework underlying sites like Hulu, Airbnb, GitHub, and early versions of Twitter. In his off hours, he's an international race car driver. We asked him how he works. Location: Right now, Malibu, California. But I also spend time in Marbella, Spain and Chicago. Current gig: CTO @ Basecamp. One word that best describes how you work: Effectively. Current mobile device: iPhone X Current computer: iMac 27" + MacBook 12" First of all, tell us a little about your background and how you got to where you are today: I got my first computer when I was 6. An Amstrad 646. But I was no child computer prodigy. I tried to learn how to program, but failed several times. Although I did end up typing in a few games from the back of magazines. But mostly, I just played other people's games on computers. Advertisement Then as a teenager I ran a warez BBS for pirated Amiga software called Electronic Confusion. I learned all about modems, calling cards, and the fascinating scene of crackers and traders. Fond memories from having my tiny bedroom light up with US Robotics modems with some dude from Holland calling into my modem. It was through this involvement with the Amiga scene that I befriended a bunch of programmers. They were all working in assembler or C to make demos or games, and watching them work, I convinced myself that this was not a profession for me. Pointer arithmetic and vector calculations was not my idea of fun. Then the internet became a thing. I still liked games, so I ended up creating a number of websites for reviewing games. In high school, I started a console review mag called konsollen.dk that ended up having 10 freelance writers and we had thousands of readers. We couldn't afford to buy all the games to review, and the distributors didn't exactly return the calls of a 16-year-old asking for free games. But I ended up befriending a manager at a game store in Copenhagen and he let me borrow all the new games for a week at a time. Advertisement That lead to creating quake3.dk in anticipation of Quake 3. Ran that for years. And then finally I created dailyrush.dk, which dealt with both consoles and PC games. That was a real startup. Created in an incubator. No business plan. Funding. The works. This was in 2000-2001. Working on all these projects forced me to learn PHP. Not because I wanted to become a programmer, but because I wanted new features for my websites. Then in 2001, I wrote Jason Fried of 37signals an email when he asked a PHP question on his blog. He decided to hire me rather than learn how to program. And from there the story went to Basecamp and Ruby on Rails and here we are. Some 15 years later! Take us through a recent workday. It depends on where I'm based. But in Malibu, it means getting up around 7:45, then driving my oldest kid to preschool, then starting working around 9:30am. Advertisement I'm kind of a slow crank. The mornings are for dealing with inbound. All the emails, requests, PRs, chat rooms, blah, blah. Catching up, chiming in, and then, if I'm lucky, getting my own work started around noon or so. That work varies widely. Some days it's all about writing. Jason and I are currently writing a new book called The Calm Company. But if it's not a book, then it's often a new blog post. Or an idea for a talk. Or ideas for Basecamp. There's a lot of writing in my work. Other days it's all about programming. That might be spiking out a new concept for Basecamp. Or it might be extracting code for inclusion in Ruby on Rails. Whatever it is, it's a treat. I love programming. Advertisement But other days still it's tickling the mechanics of running a company of some 56 people at Basecamp. We don't have a lot of layers or support staff at Basecamp. There's no CFO or COO. There are no dedicated managers. So there's just a good amount of company stuff that keeps popping up. I try to solve what I can with as little effort as possible so I can get back to writing and programming. That usually works out for the better. Less policy scar tissue, no interest in endless meetings, no appetite for bulk. What apps, gadgets, or tools can't you live without? My favorite software is all writing environments. I helped Allan shape TextMate 1 way back in 2003, and it's still my preferred text editor for code. You'll have to pry it from my dead cold hands! Advertisement But I also like iA Writer . I do most of my prose writing in that. It's beautiful, it's simple, it's free of distractions. Then there's OS X/iOS Notes. That's where all those loose ideas for new blog posts, book essays, and talks go. I also love photography. My favorite combination is a Leica M camera and a 50mm Summilux lens , and then processing the pictures using Adobe Lightroom and VSCO film presets . I've captured so many priceless memories with that combination. Especially after becoming a father. Kids are a great motivation to hone your photography craft. Advertisement Finally, I like mechanical watches. All sorts, but I have a particular weakness for vintage Daytonas . Looking at a mechanical watch that's still ticking after 40 years is a great reminder to seek longevity. Building simpler things that last longer. Taking care of them. Making them go the distance. What's your workspace setup like? Pretty sparse. My office has just a big white desk, a 27" iMac, a HiRise iPhone cradle , and a glass bottle for water. Yes, I've heard the bullshit about cluttered desks being the hallmark of a brilliant mind. But I like it neat. Clutter isn't calm, and calm is how I click. What's your best time-saving shortcut or life hack? Saying no. I'm always astonished by the tangled web of obligations most people manage to weave for themselves. I say no to almost everything. Then I can commit myself fully to the few things that I do truly choose to do. Advertisement I often get questions about how I'm able to juggle running Basecamp, programming Ruby on Rails, writing books, driving race cars, and bettering my photography. It's always a slightly puzzling question, because there's plenty of time for those things when you don't fill your life with all sorts of other bullshit. How do you keep track of what you have to do? I don't, really. I try not to have a backlog. I'm sorta obsessionally clearing out my inbox. Most emails can be answered as soon as they arrive if you just make a decision and write back briefly. Most people's inbox are overflowing because they waver, so they defer, which just makes the anxiety ever greater. Just make the call, which in my case is mostly "no," then move on. Advertisement The only tracking I generally do is of things that are outside of my control. Like, we just finished building a house. I had to have a system for keeping track of all the vendors, punch lists, and such. Basecamp fit perfectly for that, thankfully! How do you recharge? What do you do when you want to forget about work? I like work. Work is mostly programming and writing. Two of my favorite things to do in life. So I don't need to "forget" about work. Advertisement But I do need to recharge. A great day's work is 4-5 really focused hours that lead to major progress on a project or topic. Then that's it. I've found squeezing the lemon of every last drop is a sour way to live. So I race cars around the world in the World Endurance Championship. Love the feeling of total focus and flow I can tap into when behind the wheel. The exhilaration of speed, g-forces, and that tinge of danger. That'll wipe the mind right clean! I'm also a passionate photographer. It's so satisfying to capture just that perfect moment. Just the right composition in the right light. Getting the colors just so. The expressions. Advertisement And finally, I love to travel with the family. Or well, maybe not the actual traveling part-I don't know how many people love to drag kids onto airplanes-but the experiencing part. Discovering the world with my wife and kids is a real treat. But hey, sometimes it's also just spacing out in front of a show or Instagram. What's your favorite side project? Does Ruby on Rails qualify as a side project? I suppose it does. So that would be it! What are you currently reading, or what's something you'd recommend? Working my way through Debt: The First 5,000 Years . Fascinating history of money, debt, barter, slavery, morality, and all the connections between them. What's the best advice you've ever received? Amor Fati. This interview has been lightly edited. The How I Work series asks heroes, experts, and flat-out productive people to share their shortcuts, workspaces, routines, and more. Have someone you want to see featured, or questions you think we should ask? Email . The How I Work series asks heroes, experts, and flat-out productive people to share their shortcuts, workspaces, routines, and more. Have someone you want to see featured, or questions you think we should ask? Email .

See Salary Ranges and Commute Times with Google's Improved Job Search Tool

Wednesday, November 15 2017

See Salary Ranges and Commute Times with Google's Improved Job Search Tool

See Salary Ranges and Commute Times with Google's Improved Job Search Tool Patrick Lucas Austin, Gawker Media Nov 16, 2017, 12.06 AM Image credit: Leon Neal/ Getty Looking for work is stressful, especially when you think about toggling between the various job sites you'll have to scour for the right gig (not to mention all the attendant resume tweaking ) . To help, Google 's updating its recently launched Google for Jobs service , allowing job seekers to glean more information about potential gigs, and help them narrow down their prospective career opportunities without dealing with tab after tab of identical listings. Image credit: Google The job-hunting service is integrated into Google's search engine, so you can look for gigs in the same seamless way you search for celebrities' ages, or for terminal diseases based on your symptoms (it's just a cold). It also attempts to fill in the blanks on a glaring omission in nearly 85% of all job postings, according to Google : an actual salary. Google's attempting to rectify the error by including either stated or estimated salaries based on both the job title and the reported salary range from sites like Glassdoor, PayScale, and LinkedIn. Advertisement Another important feature: job seekers looking to avoid existentially crushing commutes can now narrow their potential options to particular cities or a particular distance from your home using the updated location filter tool. While job searches often involve visiting multiple job posting sites such as LinkedIn or Monster.com, if Google detects the same job posting in multiple sites, it will let you choose on which site you'd like to apply. A job saving feature is coming "in a couple of weeks" according to Google, and will allow you to save particular job listings and sync them between your devices. Employers looking to add their own job listings to Google's job searching service can follow the company's instructions on making job postings available to its search engine. You can also post your job listing on a list of sites (like LinkedIn, ZipRecruiter, and Glassdoor, among others) already integrated with Google's job searching service to avoid the hassle of integration yourself.

How to Bust Myths, With MythBusters Hosts Brian Louden and Jon Lung

Tuesday, November 14 2017

How to Bust Myths, With MythBusters Hosts Brian Louden and Jon Lung

How to Bust Myths, With MythBusters Hosts Brian Louden and Jon Lung Patrick Lucas Austin, Gawker Media Nov 14, 2017, 07.36 PM IST Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Google+ Linkedin Reddit In this episode we talk movie myths, DIY disasters, and what it takes to troubleshoot a rocket-powered sword with Brian Louden and Jon Lung of Science Channel's Mythbusters , debuting Wednesday, Nov. 15, at 9pm. The seminal science show about disproving (and then destroying) urban legends is back, and its new hosts are ready to weld, behead, and even chainsaw their way to the truth behind the rumors at the heart of every myth. Listen to above or find us in all the usual places where podcasts are served, including Apple Podcasts , Google Play , Spotify , iHeartRadio , Stitcher , and NPR One . Please subscribe, rate, and review! Discussed in This Episode: What exactly constitutes a myth? How Brian and Jon prepared for a career in busting myths What you do (and how it smells) on a body farm The growth of science-friendly YouTube channels The team behind the duo Your teeth might be giving you a headache The difference between a real cadaver and a synthetic one Anything can be a hammer Our Upgrades of the Week Every week we like to let you in on the upgrades we've made in our own lives. This week we talked about giant quiches, starting fresh with a new phone, becoming "knifebros," and finding just the right cup o' joe. Want to Say Hello? Maybe you have a question for us. Maybe you just want to say hi. Whatever it is, we're here for you: Call (347) 687-8109 and leave us a voice mail. We love voice mails! Email your question/comment to .

How to Create Your First Dungeons & Dragons Character

Tuesday, November 14 2017

How to Create Your First Dungeons & Dragons Character

How to Create Your First Dungeons & Dragons Character Nick Douglas, Gawker Media Nov 15, 2017, 01.36 AM IST Photo by Marco Hazard It's a good time to get into Dungeons & Dragons, the role-playing game featured in Stranger Things and the podcast The Adventure Zone . The game has lost its nerdy stigma and is trendy among artsy parents and their kids . But starting out can feel intimidating, with all of the game's books and charts and maps. Even if you've found a dungeon master and fellow players , now you have to create a character. You might be tempted to get really weird with it-I was. But if you plan to stick with this character for a while, you don't want to saddle yourself with someone that you eventually hate to play. Here's how to make a D&D hero that will best introduce you to the game. Pick Your Race and Class Wisely Every character has a race and class. The options can be dizzying. For my first game, I was a tiefling warlock. It was an obscure and complicated character, and I was glad to abandon it after just one session. My next character was a dwarf fighter-much more sustainable. Advertisement Each race comes with different stats and abilities. For example, dwarves can see in utter darkness, but they can't walk as fast as humans or elves. There are over two dozen playable character races in the latest version of D&D, but according to a FiveThirtyEight analysis of some official D&D stats , humans are the most popular race by far, and most characters are either a human, half-elf, or elf. If you're starting out, you should probably try a race you already understand from fiction and mythology: a human, elf, dwarf, gnome, or halfling (a public-domain hobbit). If you pick something exotic like the bird species Aarakocra , you'll spend half your time figuring out what your deal is. And so will your fellow players. That can be fun for a later game, but it's a headache when you're also figuring out how to attack a monster or talk to a shopkeep. Your class is even more important. That's your specialty, which largely determines how you achieve your goals in an adventure. You can theoretically start with any class, but if you choose a less obvious one like druid or warlock, your dungeon master might need to do some extra research to figure out how to use your skills. That can be a pain if they're already busy teaching you the basics of the game. Photo by Thomas Riggs Fighter is the most popular, and an ideal class for starting out. You'll be dealing in direct physical conflict, avoiding complicated magic, and you'll be harder to kill. As gamer Joshua Utterback put it, fighters are fun, diverse, easy, survivable, and important to the group . In a combat session, you'll be making the biggest contribution, with the least pawing through the rulebook. Advertisement Also consider the rogue, a stealthy, dextrous class that's useful in and out of combat, or the barbarian, a more reckless warrior class. If you really want to cast some spells right away, try the cleric instead of the wizard. You'll start out with the ability to heal other players, which will make you popular with the other players and build teamwork, which is crucial in a D&D campaign. Match your class to your race, says Joseph Capehart, RPG coordinator for the game shop Brooklyn Strategist. "Many people step to the table thinking 'How do I fit into this story?' Human fighters and elven wizards are easier to conceptualize and 'fit' into the story." As the FiveThirtyEight chart shows, big brutish races like half-orcs and goliaths tend to be barbarians; elves pick classes related to magic or nature. Even my tiefling warlock makes sense, Capehart says: "Tieflings are creatures with demonic or devilish ancestry, therefore it is easy to conceptualize them selling their soul to a devil or demon." Down the road, of course, you can try more challenging combos. "It's really inspiring for newer players to see their halfling barbarian or tiefling druid party member having a blast at the table," says Capehart. Advertisement You can even use a pre-generated character. Grab an official pre-gen character sheet and you can concentrating on building your character's story. If you build your own, check Geek & Sundry's guides to starting out with each class . Follow the Story, Not the Numbers Capehart applies a story-first philosophy to all parts of character creation: The advice I give everyone when starting out is to follow the story, not the numbers. If they have the time, I suggest they read about the world itself before constructing a character. The official D&D universe of The Forgotten Realms has a ton of lore and information for players to create ideas from. What this does is build a connection between the player and the character. As their character's backstory is crafted, they draw closer to the personality, goals, history, and even the sound of their character. They become more than a piece of paper and some dice. If you enjoy the story you're telling, he says, you'll enjoy the game whether or not the dice roll in your favor. The big advantage of tabletop RPGs is that they can tell complex, free-form stories; lean into that instead of obsessing over which armor will give you the best defensive stats. Advertisement If you expect to use your character for more than one or two sessions, give them some depth. "I fell into a pitfall early on by creating two dimensional characters," says Capehart. He found himself "saying the same things, making the same decisions, and creating flat relationships. I was so bored that I would find myself looking for ways for my characters to die just so I could switch to something else!" Don't let your character stats dictate your story. Just because your intelligence score is low, or your charisma is high, doesn't mean you have to roleplay those attributes all the time. Those stats are more about the skills you test by rolling dice. (Of course, if you want to roleplay your stats, you can!) Photo by Diacritica Try a Different Game While D&D is the oldest RPG and still the most popular, it's not the simplest, especially during combat. And it's oriented toward a certain kind of story, emphasizing dungeon crawls and fights. Plus it's set in a medieval fantasy realm, whereas you might want to play in the modern day, or in a cyberpunk future. Advertisement There are hundreds of roleplaying games in all kinds of genres. Go to your local gaming shop and ask an employee to help you find a game that seems fun for you. But some games, like Shadowrun or Mage, are harder to learn as your very first RPG. Capehart recommends Blades in the Dark , a steampunk urban fantasy game. "While BitD is pretty specific in genre," he says, "it offers great tools for players to hop into the game by laying out a lot of the framework for you." He also likes how the game rewards players for their narrative choices. Advertisement He also recommends FATE Core , a system that adapts to any genre. "It really stresses that the rules should not get in the way of the story, and encourages the Game Master to tell a story with the players vs the temptation to play against them." You'll need to spend more time figuring out your setting and characters, but you'll spend less time doing arithmetic. There are also many homages to D&D to appeal to different strengths. If all the roleplaying and grand quests freak you out, try Dungeon Crawl Classics , which focuses on searching dungeons and killing monsters. If you'd rather interact deeply with other characters, try Dungeon World , which takes more of a collaborative-theater approach. Whatever game you choose, you'll have a better experience if someone in the group is an experienced tabletop gamer. If everyone in your group is new, try playing at your local games store, or looking for a dungeon master on Craigslist or Nextdoor. They'll help you get the feel of the game, and make things a lot more comfortable. Then once you've gotten the hang of it, you can start going crazy.

How to Sign Documents on Whatever Device You've Got

Tuesday, November 14 2017

How to Sign Documents on Whatever Device You've Got

How to Sign Documents on Whatever Device You've Got Patrick Lucas Austin, Gawker Media Nov 15, 2017, 03.26 AM IST Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Google+ Linkedin Reddit Image credit: Sebastien Wiertz/ Flickr Signing and sending PDFs via email is always a pain, especially if you think you need to print it, sign it, scan it, and email it back to someone in a timely manner. But you don't! Using a few apps and built-in software, you can save time, money, and the agony of finding and printing from the correct office printer. iOS: Use Markup Tools for Signatures In the past, you needed a third-party PDF annotation app to add signatures to documents on iOS. Now, the operating system has capable built-in markup tools that let you edit pictures and documents by adding your handwritten signature (in addition to annotations, text, and shapes). Using your iOS device to create your signature will also allow you to sync it across all your Macs running iCloud Drive. 1 / 5 Open your PDF and select the Share tool. Select Save to Files. Select the + and select Signature. Select Add or Remove Signature and hit + to add your signature using your finger. Hit Done to save your signature, then arrange it within your PDF. Tapping your signature will let you drag it around the page and adjust its size. To scroll through your document without leaving accidental lines all over your page, use two fingers to navigate the page. If you're dealing with the PDF inside Apple's Mail app, you can sign it and send it back to your contact without opening Files or leaving the app. macOS: Use Preview (or the Trackpad) Adding a signature from your Mac is pretty simple: You can use either your trackpad or import your actual handwritten signature using your computer's front-facing camera. You'll need to use Apple's Preview app, and a sheet of paper if you're concerned with accuracy. If you've already added a signature on your Mac, and enable iCloud Drive, you'll be able to use that signature inside Apple's Markup tool on your iOS device. 1 / 4 Open your PDF using Apple's Preview app. Click the Toolbox icon, then the Signature icon. Select Create Signature. With the trackpad, select "Click Here to Begin" and draw your signature. Press any key to finish drawing, then select Done or Clear to save or redo your signature. OR: WIth the front-facing camera, write your signature in black ink on a sheet of white paper. Hold your signature in front of the camera until it recognizes and imports your signature (be sure to keep it on or above the blue line). Select done to save the imported signature. Pick your signature, then drag and scale it appropriately in your PDF. Windows 10: Use Acrobat Reader DC Windows 10 users will need a third-party app to get their documents signed. The easiest one is Adobe's Acrobat Reader DC . You can use its free Fill & Sign feature to add and import signatures to PDFs. (Unlike Apple's multiple signature support, Adobe Acrobat Reader DC only lets you store one signature and one initial.) 1 / 3 Open your PDF with Adobe Acrobat Reader DC. On the right-hand side, select Fill & Sign. Select Sign in the Fill & Sign menu. Choose Add Signature or Add Initials. You can use a typed version of your signature (you can choose from four handwritten fonts), draw it with your trackpad, or import your signature from a photo. If you're on a Surface device, you can use your Surface Pen to write your signature in the field. Android: Use Adobe's Fill & Sign App Android users should download the Adobe Fill & Sign app from the Play Store. In addition to adding signatures, the Fill & Sign app lets you add saved personal information, add text to empty fields in the PDF, and checkmarks or x's to checkboxes. 1 / 4 Select your PDF and open using Adobe Fill & Sign. Select the fountain pen icon to create a signature or initials. Use your finger to draw your signature above the blue line. Tap the fountain pen again and select your signature. Drag and scale your signature. Select the share icon to save or share your PDF.

Leave 15 Minutes Early, and Other Morning Routine Tips

Wednesday, November 15 2017

Leave 15 Minutes Early, and Other Morning Routine Tips

Leave 15 Minutes Early, and Other Morning Routine Tips Nick Douglas, Gawker Media Nov 15, 2017, 06.36 PM IST For a full-time writer at a productivity blog, I'm pretty bad at mornings . So when we asked Lifehacker's Facebook fans for their best hacks for making mornings easier , I was excited for the answers. We got some great tips! Popular tricks include a programmable coffeemaker, a repeating alarm, and getting out your clothes overnight. Here are the best tips from the thread. Federico Valentin Duran Fernandez mentally preps the night before: I go to sleep thinking of some interesting task I have to do the next day, and then wake up anticipating said task, which motivates me from bed to bus stop to desk. Ashley Coffman focuses on the day's rewards: When I find it hard to get up and motivated, I think of at least three goods I have to look forward to that day. Sometimes it's as simple as pizza for lunch or a new episode of a favorite show. Ken Dewey sets a series of terrible alarms, but never has to hear them: I have the "Screaming Goat" as my alarm...it is set at fifteen minute increments from 4:30 AM to 6:30 AM...I can normally wake myself up five or ten minutes before the first ear-bone shattering wail. I become fully awake when turning on my alarm app to disable each and every one of the alarms. Kat Bryan also has a multi-alarm system for the family's morning routines: A series of alarms that go off every 30 minutes that I track my morning progress against. Breakfast and dressed in first 30 minutes, then hair and makeup during the next 30 minutes. 30 minutes of play with the child etc. Then a completely different alarm for 10 minutes before I have to leave the house. The ten-minute warning one is a godsend as everyone knows at that point they have 10 minutes to get their act together to meet me at the car. The little one checks his bag, I get last minute instructions from the other adult, I spend 3 minutes frantically searching for my keys etc. =) It works for me. Elizabeth Bush has an alarm right out of a puzzle game: The first alarm won't turn off without scanning a QR code I keep in the bathroom. Then I set a few alarms for while I'm getting ready so I know if I'm at the right place in my routine or if I'm late. PolBob Trembler has an even cooler one: I have an alarm that obligates me to get to a very bright light source. All the LED flashlights are on the other side of the house. If I don't get there in time, my alarm blares even louder in my speakers. And Tamara Kane targets her alarm to a certain household demographic: Meme music to wake my kids up. It's the only thing that works. Steve Heffelfinger gets up on time by getting to sleep on time: Putting the phone down when I get into bed. That's 30-45 mins of sleep I wasn't getting last year. Lisa Raine starts early so she can take it easy: I get up early and leave myself plenty of time to get ready and out the door. I am not a morning person and I *hate* being rushed. Ryan Ferguson found a better way to wake up gradually: Eliminated the snooze button from my life a LONG time ago. It is the devil. Switched to one of those wake up lights that slowly gets brighter-that works pretty well. Ben Hart takes full control of his lighting: Black out shades, cheap wall outlet timer, couple extension cords, and lamps. Doesn't matter if I have to get up at 0400, an artificial dawn at 0330 does wonders. Canberk Hancan, uh, exorcises his demons: Laying on the bed farting my ass off, annihilating every good smell that exists for a while until there is no gas left inside anymore. Then I begin my day in harmony. Diosa Negra found the perfect time for her nightly setup: While cooking dinner the night before, I lay out my outfit for the next morning, prep my tote bag and fix my lunch. Matt Fran doesn't do anything before his morning coffee substitute: I drink a concentrated caffeinated drink before I even roll out of bed. I have one premixed on my nightstand made the night before. Within a couple of minutes I'm charged up and ready for the day. Guido Hulscher has a pretty good one: I hesitate to say it, but... morning sex. Joseph Plata eats a complete breakfast in one bowl: 1-minute oats with a bit of water in the microwave for 1-1/2 minutes, then add a few tablespoons of egg whites, stir, add coffee and chocolate milk, stir, enjoy. Mark May Hem gets outside: I get up 10 minutes earlier and walk outside no matter the weather. My neighborhood is at its best when no one is up. Sean Patrick creates margins to avoid being late: Set a leave time that is 15 minutes before you have to go, and stick to it. You'll of course remember last minute things that cost you time, but you won't be late. Jessica Moore-Lucas starts her day with a show: I get up about 45 minutes before the rest of my family, putter around and listen to podcasts while I wake up. When it's time to get the kids up for school, I've been up long enough that I'm in a better mood so it's only their crabbiness in play, not mine.  Heather Moss has a singalong: I listen to music that I enjoy singing along to. It wakes me up faster than anything else, and puts me in a good mood as I get ready for work. See something missing? Know the name of that cool light-activated alarm? Tell us

What Is Uranium One and Why Is It Suddenly a Big Story?

Wednesday, November 15 2017

What Is Uranium One and Why Is It Suddenly a Big Story?

What Is Uranium One and Why Is It Suddenly a Big Story? Leigh Anderson, Gawker Media Nov 15, 2017, 09.21 PM IST Three-card monty. Picture by Bob K . Sometimes certain words and phrases bubble up in the right-wing word cloud-Jeremiah Wright, birth certificate, Vince Foster, Kenya, Benghazi. The latest to surge to the front is " Uranium One ," the latest story on alleged Clintonian malfeasance to make headlines on both right-wing and mainstream media. A quick primer: A Russian company, Rosatom, acquired a majority stake in Uranium One, a Canadian company with rights to mine U.S. uranium, in 2010, and bought the rest in 2013. As the Associated Press explains : "Because Uranium One had holdings in American uranium mines, which at the time accounted for about 20 percent of America's licensed uranium mining capacity, Rosatom's 2010 purchase had to be approved by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States. That committee, known as CFIUS, is made up of officials from nine federal agencies, including the State Department, which [Secretary] Clinton ran at the time." President Trump , mired in his own Russia scandal, has recently made this an issue, raising questions about some kind of quid pro quo deal, as people associated with Uranium One had donated millions of dollars to the Clinton Foundation. The connection was first noted in a book by Peter Schweizer, who frequently collaborates on films and books with Steve Bannon of Breitbart News. So Why Now? And Is There Anything to This? On Monday, the Justice Department said prosecutors were investigating whether a special prosecutor should be appointed to look into the Uranium One deal and ties to the Clinton Foundation. This appears to be a response to the president's statement that Jeff Sessions, the attorney general, should be investigating the Clintons and the Obama administration. Advertisement This is troubling for several reasons-the first of which is that presidents are not supposed to use their platform to punish political rivals. Secondly, as the Times notes: "Any such investigation would raise questions about the independence of federal investigations under Mr. Trump. Since Watergate, the Justice Department has largely operated independently of political influence on cases related to the president's opponents." The third issue-and this is the kicker-is that the F.B.I. investigated the Clinton Foundation in 2015, and did not uncover enough evidence to mount a case. The story has a strong, strong whiff of distraction-if the media is once more whipped up about Secretary Clinton, perhaps it will devote less air time to Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation of the Trump campaign's alleged ties to Russian in the 2016 election, an investigation that issued its first indictments two weeks ago.

Vodafone May Sell Its Entire Indus Towers Stake To Bharti Infratel

Wednesday, November 15 2017

Vodafone May Sell Its Entire Indus Towers Stake To Bharti Infratel

British telecom major Vodafone is open to exploring opportunities for sale of stake in Indian mobile tower firm Indus Towers — its joint venture with Bharti Airtel and Idea Cellular. If the plan fructifies, it is expected to create more value for the group. "We will explore strategic options, including the full or partial sales of our 42 percent stake in Indus Towers, which could create further value for the group... we are also deleveraging our balance sheet by over USD 8 billion...," Vodafone Group Chief Executive Vittorio Colao said during an analyst and investor conference on Tuesday. Vodafone India has a net debt of USD 8.2 billion. Bharti Airtel's mobile tower arm Bharti Infratel and Vodafone hold 42 percent each in India's largest mobile tower firm Indus Towers and the rest is held by Idea Cellular. Bharti Infratel is looking to acquire partial or full stake in Indus Towers. Colao said Vodafone's interests "are aligned to the ones of Airtel and, if anything, Airtel has been patient in waiting for this deal to happen to then start the formal discussion on what to do with the stake". The Vodafone India and Idea merger agreement, according to Colao, will create opportunities on Indus Towers. "And we will be all aligned in a good monetization solution," Colao said. Vodafone Chief Financial Officer Nick Read said any tower sale proceeds received by Vodafone or Idea Cellular prior to closing of their merger will not affect the valuation of their deal. "Additionally, separating Indus Towers from Vodafone India Ltd as part of the transaction crystallizes the opportunity to explore strategic options to monetize some or all of this valuable asset for the Vodafone group," Read said. About the ongoing merger dynamics with Idea Cellular, Colao said it will make the resultant entity India's largest telecom operator with number 1 or 2 in 21 out of 22 circles in terms of market share. "With over 2,73,000 combined GSM sites and 189,000 3G or 4G sites, we will more than match our largest competitors in the market today," Colao said. He also said the combined entity will have 163 broadband carriers, with more than six carriers in 13 circles, which will allow it to deliver "up to 250 Mbps speeds to customers". Colao expects synergies between the two companies will improve returns on capital from the current levels. According to Read, the Birla group, the promoter of Idea, will have the right to purchase up to 9.5 percent stake in the combined entity from Vodafone during this period at an equity valuation of USD 14.1 billion. "This implies an 80 percent premium relative to the undisturbed share price of Idea. If this right is exercised, Vodafone would receive proceeds up to USD 1.34 billion in cash depending on the forex rate at the time, and the shareholdings for both parties would equalize to approximately 35.5 percent," Read added. – Business Standard Twitter

As RCom Defaults On Dollar Bonds, All Eyes On India’s Debt Recovery Process

Wednesday, November 15 2017

As RCom Defaults On Dollar Bonds, All Eyes On India’s Debt Recovery Process

Debt concerns continue to mount at Reliance Communications with the Anil Ambani-owned telecom operator recently missing interest payments on two outstanding domestic non-convertible debentures and failing to pay a coupon on its 2020 dollar notes. Its default on US dollar bonds is the first by an Indian company in the last 15 months and, according to international creditors and investment analysts, represents an interesting test-case scenario of how useful India’s new insolvency and bankruptcy code could be for offshore bondholders and creditors. According reported on Tuesday, under the new rules, bondholders can now force defaulters to come up with a debt resolution plan. Once this happens, if the company fails to present a plan within 270 days, it will face liquidation. However, senior investment analysts The Wire spoke to indicated that it was unlikely that international creditors would exercise this option at the moment. “What is likely is that the company will start talking to bond investors. Once you roll the dice and file an action in court, there’s no taking it back. What’s important above all is recovery prospects, which is what will be weighing on people’s minds,” a senior corporate lawyer, whose firm is helping state-owned banks grapple with RCom’s debt, said. Senior Indian banking officials The Wire spoke to also indicated that an immediate fallout of the dollar bond default would be an implicitly greater scrutiny of how well domestic lenders have been pushing through the company’s strategic debt restructuring (SDR) plan. After Reliance’s merger deal with Aircel was called off, the company suggested that Indian banks convert Rs 7,000 crore of debt into equity; after the conversion, domestic lenders would have a 51 percent stake in the company after conversion. However, in the last week, this process has hit road-bumps over the conversion price and the company’s insistence on priority status being given to loans that it borrowed from the promoter group. “If offshore creditors take action under the insolvency and bankruptcy code it will force RCom to come up with a debt recovery plan not just for domestic lenders, as it already has, but for all of its creditors. It will place greater emphasis on how well the domestic process is going and also test how well the new resolution process works for international investors,” a senior bank official, who declined to be identified, told The Wire. – The Wire Twitter