Latest Paranormal Activity in the World

Small Somalian cavefish hints at mammals’ nocturnal ancestor

Thursday, October 11 2018

Small Somalian cavefish hints at mammals’ nocturnal ancestor

Small Somalian cavefish hints at mammals’ nocturnal ancestor Last updated on at 5:27 pm by Mihai Andrei The blind, pale-pink cavefish has lived in constant darkness for millions of years, which caused it to lose an ancient system of DNA repair. This image shows a Somalian blind cavefish that, after evolving for millions of years in darkness, has lost the capacity to harness light for repairing DNA. Image credits: Luca Scapoli / University of Ferrara. If you spend an hour in a dark room, you’ll start to notice significant changes. Your eyes start to get used to the darkness, your other senses sharpen, and you might feel a bit weird. Imagine living the rest of your life in darkness — and then your offspring and your offspring’s offspring do the same thing, for countless generations. Much more would start to change than your eyesight. This is particularly noticeable in the case of cave creatures. The cave is a very specific environment, with little to no light and generally constant temperatures. There are more than 200 scientifically described species of cavefish, all of which show specific adaptations to this environment — and one of them can teach us something very important about mammals, including ourselves. Organisms such as bacteria, fungi, plants, and even most animals have the ability to harnesses energy from visible light to repair DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV) light. But placental mammals don’t. So all these mammals, humans included, probably originate from a creature that somehow lost this ability — just like this cavefish in Somalia. This supports the theory that the mammals’ ancestor had a subterranean or exclusively nocturnal lifestyle, perhaps as a strategy to avoid being eaten by predators such as dinosaurs. “We have revealed in a species of blind cavefish the loss of an ancient DNA repair system that is highly conserved,” says Nicholas Foulkes of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany. “Curiously, the only other animals previously known to lack photoreactivation DNA repair are placental mammals. So, what we see in this species of cavefish may be the first stages in a process that happened before in our ancestors in the Mesozoic era.” The fish in case, Phreatichthys andruzzii has lived in complete darkness for some three million years, much more than other cavefish which haven’t yet lost this ability. So this gives us an approximate idea of how long it takes for this to happen — an important clue to identifying the mammals’ ancestors. “Many features of modern mammals, such as the anatomy and function of the eye, show tell-tale features of a nocturnal life style,” Foulkes says. “It means we can now more confidently predict that mammalian ancestors experienced a prolonged period of evolution in complete darkness.” Now, researchers want to study the fish more and see whether the fish has lost or altered any other abilities that rely on sunlight to function properly. Journal Reference: Current Biology , Zhao et al .: “Modulation of DNA Repair Systems in Blind Cavefish during Evolution in Constant Darkness” https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(18)31123-0 Enjoyed this article? Join 40,000+ subscribers to the ZME Science newsletter. Subscribe now!

Thursday, October 11 2018

Prof. Hawking's final science paper released - Space News - Astronomy and Astrophysics - Unexplained Mysteries Discussion Forums

Stephen Hawking’s final scientific paper has been released by physicists who worked with the late cosmologist on his career-long effort to understand what happens to information when objects fall into black holes. The work, which tackles what theoretical physicists call “the information paradox”, was completed in the days before Hawking’s death in March. It has now been written up by his colleagues at Cambridge and Harvard universities and posted online. Malcolm Perry, a professor of theoretical physics at Cambridge and a co-author on the paper, Black Hole Entropy and Soft Hair, said the information paradox was “at the centre of Hawking’s life” for more than 40 years. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/oct/10/stephen-hawkings-final-scientific-paper-released

Thursday, October 11 2018

Ad banned for using a model that is too thin - UK and Europe - Unexplained Mysteries Discussion Forums

So do they do the same for overweight people in ads over there? Quote: The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has banned three Nasty Gal television ads for using a model that appeared "unhealthily underweight". The ASA received 22 complaints from viewers, who challenged whether the ads were "socially irresponsible". The online fashion retailer said the model was a UK size 8, with a body mass index (BMI) of 18.8, within the healthy weight range. The ASA said the model's poses drew attention to her "prominent" ribcage. "While the female model in the ads generally appeared to be in proportion, there were specific scenes which, because of her poses, drew attention to her slimness," said the ASA in its ruling . https://www.bbc.com/news/business-45808500

Speculative Fiction Writer’s Guide to War, Part 6: Psychology of Warfare: The Act of Killing

Thursday, October 11 2018

Speculative Fiction Writer’s Guide to War, Part 6: Psychology of Warfare: The Act of Killing

Travis Chapman | Oct 11, 2018 | 4 comments | Travis C. here, filling in a bit for Travis P. We both contributed to this article, and you probably remember we’re both warfighters of the U.S. military. This is a sobering topic, but it’s also part of our mission (at least being prepared for such times as we may need to). We’re also writers and this discussion is in the context of writing speculative fiction, especially fantasy and science fiction. There’s no short shrift here, only humility and honesty. As the Micah prophesied, we’ll eventually turn swords to plowshares and spears to pruning hooks. According to Dave Grossman’s book On Killing , the biggest stressor human beings face in combat is killing other human beings. The sequel to On Killing, On Combat , actually puts more emphasis on the danger of being killed, but both things haunt the human mind, largely based on the human ability to feel empathy. Feeling the suffering of the humans we kill on the one hand–and to witness friends and colleagues being killed on the other, empathetically feeling their pain as they pass on, worrying that we might be next. These particular fears are the primary causes of battlefield psychological trauma according to On Killing and On Combat . Natural human empathy does not like to be at war against other human beings. Grossman outlined several significant factors that influence the human response to killing another human being: the influence of authority, the influence of a group’s support for the warrior and perceived legitimacy of the act, the training, conditioning, experiences, and temperament of the warrior. But two key conclusions of Grossman’s research are that killing another human being is hardest when it’s face-to-face and when it involves stabbing into another person’s body. The first part of this involves the fact we humans read one another’s emotions primarily through facial cues. For almost all people, witnessing another human suffer causes at least a weak empathetic response. Like laughter or coughing becoming contagious, the normal human psyche feels a reflection of another human being’s suffering. It’s about distance If people are too far away for their faces to be seen, as in a combatant firing artillery or dropping bombs, killing bears a lesser psychological effect–unless the recipients of bombing or shelling are seen up close later. Hard, close combat causes psychological injury to human beings–submarine crews or bomber squadrons in WWII, who were in fact in as much or more danger as infantrymen, were usually less traumatized by their experiences. (Note that while snipers fire from far off, their use of optics brings their targets pretty close visually.) Note also how this factor relates to the “chase” instinct mentioned in last week’s post. When an enemy turns and runs away, it is easier to kill them by stabbing them in the back than it is to stab them while facing them. Let’s compare that to an old cultural prohibition from the Wild West: only a coward would shoot a man in the back. It might be considered more honorable to shoot someone while facing them and wrestling with the emotional consequences of one’s’ actions. It is also significantly safer to shoot someone who can’t see you, making it more likely someone might choose to pull the trigger who otherwise would have chickened out. Our ancestors judged this act to be villainous and our sense of righteousness in combat tends to recoil in response. It’s about method The “stabbing into another body” concept from above is perhaps a particular issue because it seems to strike people instinctively as being interlinked with sexual intimacy and therefore especially wrong (and for certain criminally disturbed minds, especially exciting). It happens to be true that stabbing into the body is a very effective way to kill people, generally superior to slashing or smashing. Yet human beings have often gravitated towards weapons that swing in order to slice or crush as a means of killing instead. It’s worth considering that one of the reasons why a person might use a sword to slash or hack instead of stab has nothing to do with weapon effectiveness, but rather with a psychological factor of avoiding putting a penetrative wound in another person, up close and personal. Related to the revulsion against stabbing into other human beings is the terror that the thought of having someone else do that to us inspires. Humans are certainly afraid of being bombed or shelled, largely because the terrible noises the explosions make, but we’ll take our lives into our hands in automobiles in reckless ways without much fear at all. It’s different when someone is deliberately trying to kill you. And while the idea that another human would drop a bomb on you or target you with a sniper rifle certainly can inspire fear, most people are more afraid of an enemy who will stab them to death with a knife up close. Popular media and killing in war Fantasy and science fiction have described a range of emotional responses to the act of killing, and I would say that many in the military have been influenced by books, movies, TV, and comics as they consider the choice to join the armed forces. You, dear author, have a powerful tool in your hand as an influencer of future generations. I have one specific example I want to end on, but to begin, let’s spitball a bunch of popular examples of killing with a note on realism: Example 1: In Star Wars , we see several leaders within the Empire react to the power of the Death Star. They see it only as a tool to bend others to their will, and never react to the decimation it causes when leveled against a planet. Conclusion: Extremely unlikely, even so far removed from the target. You just destroyed a planet for goodness sake! Not even a tear? Example 2: The helmeted-lackey who pulls down the priming lever for the Death Star’s weapon: no visible reaction (at least, Lucas never shows us that part of the story). Conclusion: Not as unlikely, but still a little extreme. That soldier is acting under very powerful authority, likely highly trained to follow rote procedure, and is highly distant from the consequences of his/her action. (No one is looking at the planet, right?) Example 3: It’s October, so the endless reruns of our most popular horror series should be on everyone’s radar. There’s a reason such franchises maintain their popularity: we’re all scared of being stabbed in the dark, alone, by a tall, scary being like Michael Myers. Conclusion: While the concepts are usually over-the-top, the horror genre as a whole has done well at capitalizing on a core fear of ours, and our reaction to those characters (abomination) is reflective of that. Example 4: The frequent use of phasers in the Star Trek universe. Conclusion: It’s one thing to lay down cover fire, another to actively target and kill those enemies standing before you. We rarely see evidence of Kirk and his companions (forward through the rest of the franchise) wrestling with their emotions. There are some examples of the impact distance has (is firing a phaser at a being the same as launching photon torpedoes against a vessel, or bombarding a planet?) We do, however, see the disparity between races/species and how training makes a significant impact on certain groups. For example, take your average Federation human, Klingon, and Vulcan and you can discern differences in reactions and responses based on historical, cultural, and species-level differences. I’m picking some low-hanging fruit, but look at your favorite series and you should find examples that either support the analysis Travis P gave, or seem over-the-top in comparison and therefore should strike us as awkward. It may be entertaining, but it isn’t an accurate portrayal of reality. In reality, killing is hard and it impacts the warfighter. Finally, an example that gets it well, and one that gets close but not quite. Many readers may be familiar with Brandon Sanderson’s Stormlight Archive . It follows a small cast of characters as they navigate a world on the brink of destruction from ancient powers, all while humanity is fighting amongst itself for power and supremacy. Enter Dalinar Kholin, brother of the king, Brightlord, and Highprince of War of the Alethi armies. He has received visions and knowledge of an ancient path known as The Way of Kings, a code of honor that he attempts to resurrect among the factious Alethi. His son, Adolin, doesn’t quite get it, but is strongly influenced by his father. This part of the plot is in stark contrast to Brightlord Sadeas, who basically represents everything we would ever hate about a person (selfish, backstabbing, conniving, spiteful, basically awful in every way). Spoiler alert…… When Adolin reacts to Sadeas at the conclusion of Words of Radiance , we all rejoice a little bit. Comeuppence is given. A wrong is righted. But Adolin immediately knows he’s in the wrong. He took the coward’s way. He reacted to the right circumstances, took the action he deemed necessary, but he killed a man kind of out-of-combat by stabbing him face-to-face in the eye. For one who gained notoriety through dueling, whose father is trying to bring about a seachange in the belief system of the entire army, Adolin knows this will be devastating. What a great place to begin the next book, Oathbringer , and watch him wrestle with the consequences of his actions, of his moral and ethical dilemma, and his reactions to those around him. Contrast that with a childhood favorite of many. Let’s see if you can guess where I’m going. “ I will go up to the six-fingered man and say, ‘Hello. My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die. ” Since he was eleven years old, Inigo has been preparing himself to do one deed: avenge his father, a master bladesmith who crafted a master blade, was refused payment, and was murdered by the six-fingered man. It’s hard not to feel satisfaction when his duel at the end of The Princess Bride comes to its inevitable conclusion. And let’s face it, would it be as popular if it ended with, “You killed my father. I forgive you”? Sigh… someday, we’ll have ploughshares. Let’s take a look at the realism in this example though: Authority : Inigo is acting on moral authority to right the wrong of his father’s death and stop a murderer (take that in contrast to two combatants fighting one another in war… ) Experience : Certainly the death of his father has galvanized Inigo into the hardened fighter he is today. It spurs him on against all odds. He has intentionally chosen to never forget what occurred and to actively pursue the training and opportunity to get revenge. Training : A lifetime of training has molded Inigo into a consummate swordsman (bested only by the Dread Pirate Roberts, right?) It’s probably accurate to say that he has trained out any emotional reaction to killing the six-fingered man. In his mind, Inigo isn’t taking a man’s life, he is stopping an evil. All of that should support the idea of Inigo as an elite warrior (which we’ll get to next week) incapable of fear.. Which leaves me struggling with the likelihood that the six-fingered man just happened to kill the father of an eleven-year-old boy who happens to be in an extremely small category of people who can conduct an extremely intimate act of violence (stabbing, face-to-face, while in close proximity) and have no reaction afterwards. He just runs to Wesley’s aid and they escape like nothing’s happened. He solemnly nods his head, “Yes, the six fingered man is dead.” WHAT!!! YOU STABBED A DUDE!!! THAT’S CALLED MURDER!!! (Author Travis’s reaction.) Admittedly, The Princess Bride leaves us behind before the victors can stop and really process their emotions. We don’t see Inigo struggle to overcome the consequences of achieving his revenge (Now what? Take up Sudoku?) We don’t see him wrestle with the question of whether he truly achieved an honorable outcome for his father’s memory. We don’t see him have trouble reintegrating into society as the unforgiving guy who stabs people and doesn’t ever let go of a grudge. Or the guy who pursues justice at whatever cost to himself. As authors, we have the ability to help our audience wrestle with those realities. We can provide a glimpse of how our hero, or villains, actions may or may not impact them and open that up for discussion. Next week we’ll introduce one such example, the idea of the warrior elite, a very small percentage of humans that are capable of violent acts with seemingly no emotional impact. Till then, let’s close with a quote from On Killing to help you frame the challenge of killing others in your stories: The basic aim of a nation at war is establishing an image of the enemy in order to distinguish as sharply as possible the act of killing from the act of murder. — Glenn Gray, The Warriors

Thursday, October 11 2018

Medication errors for 260,000 diabetics - UK and Europe - Unexplained Mysteries Discussion Forums

More than 260,000 diabetes inpatients experienced a medication error during their hospital stay last year - putting them at risk of lasting harm or death. According to Diabetes UK, 9,600 inpatients experienced a serious and potentially life-threatening episode of hypoglycaemia because of poor insulin management while they were in hospital. Full report: https://news.sky.com/story/unacceptable-hospital-mistakes-put-9600-diabetic-lives-in-danger-11521083 Elsewhere: Diabetic patients in NHS hospitals are being put at risk of serious harm or death as a lack of specialist staff contributed to 260,000 medication errors last year, charities have warned. Full report: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/health/diabetes-patients-nhs-hospitals-risk-life-threatening-errors-a8573046.html

The season 3 premiere of Riverdale was pretty boring, giving

Thursday, October 11 2018

The season 3 premiere of Riverdale was pretty boring, giving

Archie, you idiot. Photo: Jack Rowand (The CW) The season 3 premiere of Riverdale was pretty boring, giving us more of the Archie vs. Hiram shit that doesn’t work if they’re not seductively wrestling each other. At least, until the last five minutes, when Taylor Swift’s boyfriend walked into the room, set off a giant smoke bomb, and said “ Everything’s changed , suckers, get on board or get off the boat.” Advertisement “Chapter Thirty-Six: Labor Day” spends most of its time playing the waiting game—literally, as Archie and his friends wait to find out the verdict for his murder trial. There’s no evidence to support Archie being the killer, and Hiram Lodge spends most of his time being incredibly obvious that he’s setting the red-haired teen up, and yet the jury is still hung...even after the extended Labor Day weekend deliberation. This is when shit hits every fan in town. Brace yourselves. In lieu of another trial, the district attorney immediately offers a plea deal: Archie pleads guilty to manslaughter and gets time served plus two years in juvenile detention. Archie doesn’t do the smart thing and ask the prosecutor for a private re-negotiation with his attorney, who also happens to be his mother. Instead, he leaps out of his chair, screaming “I accept!” at the top of his beefy, chiseled lungs. No, no you don’t, Archie. That’s what an idiot would do. Advertisement So yep, Archie’s heading to jail. Luckily, he got a South Side Serpents tattoo put on his arm in one of the episode’s many Archie Shirtless Scenes™, so he should be fine. Meanwhile, Archie’s parents are preparing an appeal, confident they can clear Archie’s name and get him out of his sentence. Look, I’m not a legal expert, but I’m fairly positive that if someone willingly enters a plea deal—especially against the wishes of their legal counsel—that lawyer cannot appeal on their behalf and expect anything to happen. Archie confessed to the crime. It’s going to be nigh-impossible to undo that. Of course, the sad truth is it’s probably going to work. They can’t have Archie in jail all season. But the way they’re going to weasel their way out of this will most likely be very stupid. That alone would be enough to consider this episode a glorious mess of “what the effery.” But no. We’ve also got the pseudo- Dungeons & Dragons mystery. Oh yeah, and a magic cult of floating babies . The episode does a solid job at laying the breadcrumbs for one—or possibly two—of the season’s biggest story arcs. First, you’ve got a couple of kids playing a tabletop role-playing game at Pop’s Diner, during one of many “Archie gets all emo about his fate” scenes. Jughead innocently asks what they’re playing, only to have one of them to get all antsy about it. Turns out, that game is Griffins & Gargoyles , and it’s way more than just another RPG. One of the players goes to Jughead for help, warning him about the Gargoyle King, only to be turned away because they’re about to announce the verdict for Archie’s trial. Damn, Archie just gets in the way of everything . Advertisement Then, Jughead finds a Griffins & Gargoyles map the kid left behind, which takes him to the Riverdale woods and the site of a terrifying, quasi-Satanic altar. The two players we saw at Pop’s have been stripped down to their skivvies, runes cut into their backs, poisoned with a blue liquid, and left prostrated in front of the animalistic statue. What the hell? This may or may not tie into the other big storyline of the season: Polly’s cult. Betty’s mom, Alice, has embraced the ways of the hippie, substituting investigative journalism for good vibes and Oolong tea. Betty is not okay with this, but she’s got her own problems to deal with: She’s been pretending to see a psychiatrist and filling out fake prescriptions for Adderall (man, her pharmacist must be pretty dense). Polly and Alice use this as proof that Betty needs to join the Farm, but I don’t think she’s going to want to enlist after seeing the weird ritual sacrifice going on in their backyard. The episode ends with Betty seeing Polly and Alice, surrounded by a bunch of cultists, doing some sort of incantation that makes two babies magically float over an open fire. Then, she has a seizure. Is that the Adderall kicking in, was there something in the swimming hole water (there was a lingering shot of the “No Swimming After Labor Day” sign), or does the cult actually have powers? I learned at the Vancouver set visit that we’re not getting a Chilling Adventures of Sabrina crossover, at least not this season, so this might be the closest we get. Advertisement Keep in mind, all of these events happen in the span of seven minutes. And I’ve got to be honest, I’m kind of on board. Before this ending, the episode had mostly left me feeling tired, frustrated with the direction Riverdale has gone. But these last few minutes showed they’re clearly stepping up their game and trying something new. Something creepy. And I’m into it. Damn Riverdale , you might be full of nonsense, but you’re my brand of nonsense. Thank you for that. Share This Story

Thursday, October 11 2018

Easter Island figures pointed to water - Palaeontology, Archaeology & History - Unexplained Mysteries Discussion Forums

The lost civilization of Easter Island may have chosen the location of the iconic moai heads to signal where fresh water was available, a study has suggested. Carl Lipo, an anthropologist who has spent almost 20 years studying the Rapa Nui people and their disappearance from Easter Island, was looking at how the population was able to survive with such limited access to drinking water. Across the island, there is very little access to freshwater—springs and streams are almost completely absent and there is very little rainfall (approximately 48.8 inches per year). So how did a civilization of an estimated 15,000-20,000 at its peak manage to survive? Full article: https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/offbeat/easter-island-heads-mystery-solved/ar-BBOdhaC?OCID=ansmsnnews11 At Science-Daily: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/10/181009114946.htm Edited Thursday at 12:25 PM by Eldorado

Thursday, October 11 2018

Songs in the Sun (2018) Bushwick Film Festival 2018

Songs in the Sun is a film that I am still wrestling with. An odd little film ,it runs just over an hour, it is both distancing and visceral. More than a week after seeing it I’m still not sure what I think about it. The film begins when a young woman gets a call from the mother of one of her friends. It seems her daughter is acting strangely and she is worried. Would it be possible to come by and see her? She does come by and finds that the her friend is obsessed with finding the garden of the Cliff King, a place her mother said she had stumbled upon when she was a child. What transpires is a kind of dance between the women as they try to sort out what is behind the obsession. Kind of an art film and kind of not Songs in the Sun is its own little piece of cinema. While at times very deliberate and artistic that keeps us distant, there is a raw emotional truth rumbling underneath it all. There were several times where I was moved by what I was seeing, much more than I should have been had the film been a pure art film. When the film ended I was left staring at the screen- pondering what I had just seen and knowing that I needed to see it again because the brief material I had read on it from the Bushwick Film Festival hadn’t done it justice. While not for all audiences, for the adventurous film goer or one with a bend toward the art house Songs in the Sun is highly recommended when it plays Saturday. For more information and tickets go here .

Even small gifts can convince customers to buy, new study reveals

Thursday, October 11 2018

Even small gifts can convince customers to buy, new study reveals

Even small gifts can convince customers to buy, new study reveals Last updated on at 1:27 pm by Alexandra Gerea If sales agents bring a gift (even a small gift), they’re much more likely to score a sale, a new study suggests — but only sometimes. The fact that small gifts can make such a significant difference can easily be understood as a conflict of interest, raising intriguing questions about what actually constitutes a bribery. There’s often a fine line between small gifts and small bribery attempts. Where do you draw the line between a small token of appreciation and an attempted bribery? Surely, most people would agree that something small, like a chocolate, is not a bribe, whereas something more substantial, like money, is. But between chocolate and money, there’s a line to be drawn, and it’s not always clear where the line should sit. Furthermore, what if even the small chocolate would be problematic? In a controlled field experiment carried out in pharmacies and drugstores, Michel Maréchal and Christian Thöni of the universities of Zurich and Lausanne investigated whether small presents in business relationships have an influence on the behavior of the recipient. In the experiment, sales representatives gave their customers six tubes of toothpaste — an almost negligible gift in terms of market value. But this seemingly insignificant token sometimes had a noticeable effect on some clients, making them twice more likely to buy. But there’s a catch: this only worked if there was a previous business relationship, if the buyer and the seller knew each other. In fact, if the two didn’t know each other, the gift likely had an opposite effect. “Turning up with a gift right at the beginning of a business relationship may seem calculating and is therefore counter-productive,” remarks UZH Professor Michel Maréchal on the finding. “But if there is already a relationship, the customer perceives the gift as a token of thanks and an indication that the relationship is appreciated.” The effect also wasn’t spread uniformly. For low-level employees, it made an almost negligible effect, whereas for bosses, the value of the order increased more than four times, from an average of 61 Swiss francs to 271 francs. This presumably happens because bosses have the most power, but it also suggests that bosses could use a bit more responsibility when making purchases — particularly when receiving gifts beforehand. “They also bear the most risk, however, which makes it surprising that they were willing to order so many products,” says Christian Thöni of the University of Lausanne. Journal Reference: Michel André Maréchal and Christian Thöni. Hidden Persuaders: Do Small Gifts Lubricate Business Negotiations? Management Science. October 1, 2018. DOI: 10.1287/mnsc.2018.3113 Enjoyed this article? Join 40,000+ subscribers to the ZME Science newsletter. Subscribe now!

Bees completely stopped flying during the 2017 total solar eclipse

Thursday, October 11 2018

Bees completely stopped flying during the 2017 total solar eclipse

Bees completely stopped flying during the 2017 total solar eclipse Last updated on at 3:11 pm by Tibi Puiu Credit: Pixabay. Last year’s total solar eclipse was all the rage around the continental United States. For honeybees, however, the whole experience was rather confusing. A citizen science project that included both researchers and elementary-schoolers, monitored bees during the eerie moments when the moon blocked the sun. The study found that it wasn’t just Americans who took a break, but also the bees, who stopped foraging and just idled around. Who took the lights out? The study’s authors, which included more than 400 participants, set up 16 monitoring stations across Oregon, Idaho, and Missouri, on the path of totality during the 2017 eclipse. Each station was fitted with microphones shielded by windscreens in order to minimize noise. Suspended from lanyards, the microphones recorded the buzz of bees as they zig-zagged from lower to flower. The researchers also recorded data on light and temperature. Before and after the eclipse, the bees were active in phases. However, during the totality itself, the bees completely stopped flying. “We anticipated, based on the smattering of reports in the literature, that bee activity would drop as light dimmed during the eclipse and would reach a minimum at totality,” said Candace Galen, professor of biological sciences at the University of Missouri and lead researcher on the study. “But, we had not expected that the change would be so abrupt, that bees would continue flying up until totality and only then stop, completely. It was like ‘lights out’ at summer camp! That surprised us.” Since the bees tended to fly for a longer duration immediately before and after the totality, the authors of the new study suspect that the sudden darkness may have coaxed the insects to return to their nests. Usually, at night, bees return to their nests and fly more slowly. Just one buzz was recorded during totality in all of the 16 monitoring locations. RELATED Kabuno Bay microbes shed light on how iron deposits are formed Alternatively, the eclipse may have caused the bees to reduce flight speed — so that they might not bump into things or each other. The researchers could not differentiate between bee species from the recordings alone but observations suggest that the monitored bees were bumblebees (genus Bombu s) or honey bees ( Apis mellifera ). Scientists have known for a while that animals behave differently, sometimes bizarrely, during eclipses. For instance, orb-weaving spiders destroy their webs during an eclipse. “The eclipse gave us an opportunity to ask whether the novel environmental context–mid-day, open skies–would alter the bees’ behavioral response to dim light and darkness. As we found, complete darkness elicits the same behavior in bees, regardless of timing or context. And that’s new information about bee cognition,” Galen says. The next solar eclipse will take place on April 8, 2024. This time, Galen and researchers plan on monitoring bees again to see whether the insects actually head home when the lights go off. “The total solar eclipse was a complete crowd-pleaser, and it was great fun to hitch bee research to its tidal wave of enthusiasm,” Galen says. The findings were published in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America . Enjoyed this article? Join 40,000+ subscribers to the ZME Science newsletter. Subscribe now!

People can recognize an average of 5,000 faces, a new study reports

Thursday, October 11 2018

People can recognize an average of 5,000 faces, a new study reports

People can recognize an average of 5,000 faces, a new study reports Last updated on at 3:50 pm by Alexandru Micu That’s a lot of people. Image credits Caroline Hummels. New research from the University of York (UoY) has, for the first time, put a figure on how many faces people can actually recognize: roughly 5,000, on average. The findings help flesh out our understanding of human social dynamics and the role our brains play in forming our social groups. The original Book of Faces “The ability to distinguish different individuals is clearly important — it allows you to keep track of people’s behaviour over time, and to modify your own behaviour accordingly,” says lead researcher Dr Rob Jenkins from the UoY’s Department of Psychology. The team worked with a group of relatively young participants (mean age 24) to determine how many faces they could recall from all walks of life — their personal life, media, or celebrities. The results, the authors write, help provide a rough baseline from which they can gauge the human “facial vocabulary”. Such data, beyond academic and research interests, would be a useful indicator of the efficiency of facial recognition software — the kind that are increasingly used to identify people at airports and in police investigations. Each participant was asked to write down the names of as many people in their lives whose faces they could remember. Anyone was fair game, from family to former classmates. They had one hour for this step. Afterward, they were asked to do the same, this time with famous faces — such as actors, politicians, or other public figures. Participants (predictably) were quick to come up with a lot of names at first but found it progressively harder to do so by the end of the hour. The team analyzed this change of pace to estimate when each participant would run out of faces they remembered. In a subsequent phase of the trial, participants were also shown photographs of thousands of famous and public individuals, asking which one they recognized. To weed out false positives, participants were required to recognize two different photos of each person. Participants’ facial memory varied quite a lot, the team reports, between 1,000 and 10,000 different faces. “The range could be explained by some people having a natural aptitude for remembering faces. There are differences in how much attention people pay to faces, and how efficiently they process the information,” Dr. Jenkins reports. “Alternatively, it could reflect different social environments — some participants may have grown up in more densely populated places with more social input.” It makes sense for our brains to be good at remembering faces : after all, we’ve evolved to live in tightly-knit groups formed on a great degree of social interaction and cooperation, so identifying different people was an important skill to have. However, the number identified in the research is quite surprising — ancient human communities numbered around one hundred individuals or so. Whether our brains were always able to juggle so many faces, or whether its a skill it acquired as our social groups expanded, is still up for debate. “Our study focused on the number of faces people actually know,” Dr. Jenkins explains. “We haven’t yet found a limit on how many faces the brain can handle.” In the future, the team would be interested to see if a participant’s age has any bearing on their ‘facial vocabulary’. “It would be interesting to see whether there is a peak age for the number of faces we know,” said Dr Jenkins. “Perhaps we accumulate faces throughout our lifetimes, or perhaps we start to forget some after we reach a certain age.” The paper “How many faces do people know?” has been published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. Enjoyed this article? Join 40,000+ subscribers to the ZME Science newsletter. Subscribe now!

#BlogTour #BookReview Chasing Ghosts by Madalyn Morgan @ActScribblerDJ @rararesources

Thursday, October 11 2018

#BlogTour #BookReview Chasing Ghosts by Madalyn Morgan @ActScribblerDJ @rararesources

Win signed copies of China Blue and Chasing Ghosts (UK Only) a Rafflecopter giveaway *Terms and Conditions – UK entries welcome. Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below. The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then I reserve the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over. Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time I will delete the data. I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize. Thank you to Madalyn Morgan & Rachel’s Random Resources for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review. About Madalyn Morgan Madalyn Morgan has been an actress for more than thirty years working in Repertory theatre, the West End, film and television. She is a radio presenter and journalist, writing articles for newspapers and magazines. Madalyn was brought up in Lutterworth, at the Fox Inn. The pub was a great place for an aspiring actress and writer to live, as there were so many different characters to study and accents to learn. At twenty-four Madalyn gave up a successful hairdressing salon and wig-hire business for a place at E15 Drama College, and a career as an actress. In 2000, with fewer parts available for older actresses, Madalyn taught herself to touch type, completed a two-year correspondence course with The Writer’s Bureau, and started writing. After living in London for thirty-six years, she has returned to her home town of Lutterworth, swapping two window boxes and a mortgage, for a garden and the freedom to write. Happy to be an Indie Author, Madalyn has successfully published six novels. Foxden Acres, Applause, China Blue and The 9:45 To Bletchley are set before and during WW2 and tell the wartime stories of Bess, Margot, Claire, and Ena Dudley. Foxden Hotel and Chasing Ghosts are both post war. Chasing Ghosts is a sequel to China Blue. Madalyn’s books are available on Amazon - in paperback and all formats of eBook.

Thursday, October 11 2018

6. BoÄŸaziçi Film Festivali’nin ProgramÄą AçĹklandÄą

26 Ekim’de baĹŸlayacak 6. BoÄŸaziçi Film Festivali’nin basÄąn toplantÄąsÄą bugĂźn yapÄąldÄą. Soho House Ä°stanbul’da gerçekleĹŸen ve festivalin bu yÄąlki programÄąnÄąn ve yeniliklerinin tanÄątÄąldÄąÄŸÄą toplantÄąda festival baĹŸkanÄą OgĂźn ĹžanlÄąer, BoÄŸaziçi Film Festivali’nin yerli sinemaya olan katkÄąsÄąna vurgu yaptÄą. TĂźrkiye ve dĂźnya sinemasÄąnÄąn en yeni ve ĂśdĂźllĂź Ăśrneklerini Ä°stanbullu sinemaseverlerle buluĹŸturacak 6. BoÄŸaziçi Film Festivali’nin programÄą açĹklandÄą. 41 Ăźlkeden 90 yĂśnetmenin toplam 88 filmi gĂśsterilecek! T.C. KĂźltĂźr ve Turizm BakanlÄąÄŸÄą Sinema Genel MĂźdĂźrlĂźÄŸĂźâ€™nĂźn katkÄąlarÄąyla, Ä°stanbul BoÄŸazÄą Belediyeleri BirliÄŸi ana sponsorluÄŸunda ve Kurumsal Ä°ĹŸ OrtaÄŸÄą TRT, Global Ä°letiĹŸim OrtaÄŸÄą Anadolu AjansÄą, Ä°letiĹŸim OrtaÄŸÄą TV+ ile Kurumsal Ä°letiĹŸim OrtaÄŸÄą TĂźrkMedya’nÄąn destekleriyle dĂźzenlenecek 6. BoÄŸaziçi Film Festivali, 26 Ekim’de baĹŸlÄąyor. 3 KasÄąm’a dek sĂźrecek festivalin basÄąn toplantÄąsÄą ise bugĂźn Soho House Ä°stanbul’da yapÄąldÄą. BoÄŸaziçi Film Festivali’nin bu yÄąlki programÄąnÄąn ve yeniliklerinin tanÄątÄąldÄąÄŸÄą toplantÄąnÄąn açĹlÄąĹŸÄąnÄą festival baĹŸkanÄą OgĂźn ĹžanlÄąer yaptÄą. BoÄŸaziçi Film Festivali ile TĂźrkiye’de sinema alanÄąnda gerçekleĹŸtirilen ulusal ve uluslararasÄą etkinliklerin en Ăśnemlilerinden birisi olma yĂśnĂźnde saÄŸlam ve emin adÄąmlarla yĂźrĂźmeye devam ettiklerini sĂśyleyen ĹžanlÄąer, “Hem yerli sinemamÄązÄąn hem de uluslararasÄą sinema dĂźnyasÄąnÄąn Ăśnemli ve usta isimlerine Ä°stanbul’da ev sahipliÄŸi yapmaktan bĂźyĂźk gurur duyuyoruz” dedi. Yerli sinema Ăźretimine verdikleri desteÄŸin Ăśneminden de sĂśz eden ĹžanlÄąer, TRT’nin kurumsal iĹŸ ortaklÄąÄŸÄąyla dĂźzenledikleri Bosphorus Film Lab ile genç yapÄąmcÄą ve yĂśnetmenlerin yeni filmler Ăźretmesine maddi ve manevi destek oluĹŸturmayÄą amaçladÄąklarÄąnÄą sĂśyledi. Ă–teki Sinema © 2018 | 0 yorum | yazÄąnÄąn devamÄą » The post 6. BoÄŸaziçi Film Festivali’nin ProgramÄą AçĹklandÄą appeared first on Ă–teki Sinema .

Saturday, September 29 2018

rePhase, a loudspeaker phase linearization, EQ and FIR filtering tool - Page 253 - diyAudio

Playing filter based on "Reject High". What is behind this option in terms of filter technology? //

Thursday, October 11 2018

Don't speak ill of the dead - Philosophy and Psychology - Unexplained Mysteries Discussion Forums

Why do people say "Don't Speak Ill Of The Dead"? My opinion is why does it do something to you? Or maybe came out in the bible. I say this because my oldest sister passed away about 2 years ago. She was very hateful to me because I was the youngest. She told her oldest daughter not to invite me to her funeral if she died before me. One of my aunts asked me what happened between you? I said, " Nothing she just did not like me because I was the youngest and she always wanted to be first in all things." So I did not go to her funeral. I did feel bad only because we never got along. I wished I had a loving older sister. Never had it.