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Say goodbye to the HBO we know, as new parent company AT&T warns of a “tough year” ahead

Tuesday, July 10 2018

Say goodbye to the HBO we know, as new parent company AT&T warns of a “tough year” ahead

Facebook 3 Back in June, the mammoth merger between AT&T and Time Warner was approved, giving AT&T heaps of new assets to make money off of and expand. One such property is HBO, which AT&T originally claimed they would take a hands-off approach with. That seems like the obvious course of action, as HBO has been a television giant for decades, has won countless Emmy awards and has dictated the conversation in popular culture with generational hits such as Game of Thrones and The Sopranos . Evidently though, that no longer seems to be AT&T’s strategy. According to audio obtained by the New York Times , AT&T executive John Stankey told 150 HBO employees in a town hall meeting at HBO’s headquarters in Manhattan that “it’s going to be a tough year.” He went on to clarify, “It’s going to be a lot of work to alter and change direction a little bit.” Stankey seems to be angling toward pushing streaming services more to compete with the likes of Netflix and Hulu, though those competitors were never mentioned by name. HBO does have its own streaming offerings in the form of HBO GO and HBO NOW, the latter of which doesn’t require a cable subscription. But as the Times notes, “Stankey described a future in which HBO would substantially increase its subscriber base and the number of hours that viewers spend watching its shows. To pull it off, the network will have to come up with more content, transforming itself from a boutique operation, with a focus on its signature Sunday night lineup, into something bigger and broader.” Unfortunately, this is anathema to HBO’s long-standing and proven formula of focusing on a few sprawling, high-production value epics. A move to more bite-sized, lowest-common-denominator programming may increase the bottom line, but moving away from what has made HBO so culturally relevant for so long is a risky move — even Netflix, ostensibly HBO’s biggest competitor in the current landscape, has realized the importance of original programming, and have spent millions on programming that have become cultural sensations, such as Stranger Things . Mr. Stankey told HBO’s employees, “We need hours a day. It’s not hours a week, and it’s not hours a month. We need hours a day. You are competing with devices that sit in people’s hands that capture their attention every 15 minutes.” He went on to explain, “I want more hours of engagement. Why are more hours of engagement important? Because you get more data and information about a customer that then allows you to do things like monetize through alternate models of advertising as well as subscriptions, which I think is very important to play in tomorrow’s world.” This sounds like a sadly all-too-familiar strategy of missing the forest for the trees, and putting corporate profit ahead of captivating programming. It would be understandable if HBO was some struggling studio, but HBO’s current strategy is proven to work: HBO’s revenues in 2017 rose 13% to $1.7 billion. Game of Thrones is wrapping up next season anyway, but it would be interesting to see if a series such as GoT would make the cut in AT&T’s vision of a meme-ified HBO. At millions of dollars spent and feature film runtime per episode, would the series meet AT&T’s new standards that focus more on data collection than customer satisfaction? Will a series like Last Week Tonight with John Oliver , which prides itself on pushing the envelope and starting controversy, even be allowed to exist? Despite AT&T’s original comments on the matter, it appears we better buckle in for some big changes coming to HBO and its programming. In their own words, some tough times are ahead for the venerable network.

Tuesday, July 10 2018

Release Blitz: The Omega’s Second Chance by Kenna Grace

RELEASE BLITZ Book Title: The Omega’s Second Chance (Bundle of Joy series, Book 2) Author: Kenna Grace Publisher: Self-Published Cover Artist: Ana J. Phoenix Genre/s: Mpreg MM gay romance Length: 52, 000 words Buy Links Amazon US Author Page Buy Links: Amazon US Amazon UK Blurb Two best friends reunite and discover they could be something more in this mpreg, gay-for-you, second chance romance. Cody I left home a decade ago to get away from my crush on my straight best friend. Traveling the world helped me get over him, and now that I’m back to take care of my uncle, I should be immune. Except I’m not. I want him as much as I did before, but this time is different. This time, he seems as interested in me as I am in him, but how can that be when he’s straight? Soon enough, his baby is inside me, but that drives us apart instead of bringing us together. Derek Cody was my best friend, and I always ignored any feelings that were more than friendly. It was easy then, since I was about to marry my childhood sweetheart. In the years since, I’ve learned there’s nothing sweet about Heidi, weathered a divorce, and the loss of my NFL career. I’m home again and ready for something more. Cody is just what I want, but when he gets pregnant, I know it can’t be mine because I’m infertile. Aren’t I? About the Author Continue »

UFO footage and filmed in South of Banbury, Oxfordshire 07/07/18

Tuesday, July 10 2018

UFO footage and filmed in South of Banbury, Oxfordshire 07/07/18

07-09-18 posted to Aliens & UFOs Am UFO filmed in South of Banbury, Oxfordshire . Really sorry for the poor quality and shakiness due to the camera and its limited capabilities. Nonetheless this is good. Was there for a good few minutes before I got the camera on it and just after I got bored it zoomed upwards and was gone. WATCH NEXT

Tuesday, July 10 2018

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Strange Horizons - Vestiges (QuanTika, Book 1) by Laurence Suhner, translated by Sheryl Curtis By Rachel Cordasco

Monday, July 9 2018

Strange Horizons - Vestiges (QuanTika, Book 1) by Laurence Suhner, translated by Sheryl Curtis By Rachel Cordasco

Issue: 9 July 2018 Vestiges , the first book in the QuanTika trilogy, is a multi-dimensional tour de force from polymath Swiss SF author Laurence Suhner. Having studied subjects like archaeology and physics and worked as a storyboard artist and illustrator, among many other things, Suhner is perfectly positioned to bring her readers stories that get to the heart of what it means to be human—physically, psychologically, linguistically—and what our place in the universe might really be. In Vestiges , she brings her knowledge, style, and passion to a story that mixes science, religion, myth, and archaeology in fascinating ways. Suhner's fast-paced yet thoughtful novel, about two species and their connection to an ice-locked planet, is the kind of book that anyone who loves speculative fiction would want to read. But Vestiges , expertly translated into English by Sheryl Curtis, hasn't yet been picked up by an English-language publisher. This review is by way of voicing my own interest in this book, and the series in general, in the hope that, together, we might convince editors here in the US to bring it over from across the Atlantic. Set in the twenty-fourth century on a frozen yet habitable extrasolar planet called Gemma in the binary Alta-Mira system, Vestiges is a complex story about a mysterious alien species that visited Gemma centuries before, and the human factions currently fighting over how best to settle the planet for the foreseeable future. Suhner introduces us to the brilliant and troubled exobiologist Ambre Pasquier and her team of glaciologists, geophysicists, geneticists, engineers, doctors, and others who have obtained permission from Gemman authorities to (officially) search for signs of primitive life below the ice. Unofficially, Ambre intends for her team to drill deep into the substrata in search of something that has been haunting her dreams for years: ancient alien ruins that may contain a powerful psychic lifeforce. These ruins may in fact be linked to the sealed ship in orbit around Gemma that the humans have called the "Great Arch," and which they assume was built and left behind by the planet's previous visitors. Hooked yet? Of course you are. Ambre's planned excavation coincides with a series of strange accidents that have been plaguing one particular area of the Glacier—one which is important to the colony's liquefied gas and petroleum extraction operations. While authorities have been blaming these explosions on a separatist group calling itself the "Children of Gemma," the members of an experimental physics lab (housed in the former Tetra weather base) have realized that these accidents are likely caused by an inexplicable and terrifying force. They call it the "Collapsus Point," a place where the laws of physics (according to humans) don't seem to apply. As Haziel Delaurier, a member of this team, eventually explains to Ambre, whose expedition he's infiltrated: The Collapsus Point causes space-time to experience variations that remain unexplained to date. Usually flat, it curves and distorts as if under the influence of a very intense gravitational field. We find ourselves plunged in a universe that reproduced Planck's conditions—minute zero if you prefer—a universe where the laws of physics stop operating in a coherent manner. Linear time gives way to imaginary time, which is both frozen and in movement, expanding or retracting on itself in turn, at a frantic pace. (p. 142) Here's where two of the several storylines that Suhner develops in Vestiges intersect, with Ambre and Haziel sharing separate knowledge about the Collapsus Point and the ruins that previously only one or the other of them understood. For Ambre, a scientist who has, because of a never-explained trauma that she experienced at the age of thirteen, tried to repress her Mumbai past and her religious and myth-infused upbringing, the fact that her dreams have been invaded by an entity she calls the "Dark Lord" is intolerable. And yet, these dreams have told her exactly where to find alien ruins below the incredibly thick ice sheet, something that scientific instruments have been unable to do. Haziel and the experimental physics team, meanwhile, have been drawn to that same area by the paradoxes of the Collapsus Point, suggesting that whatever is below the surface (a machine? a powerful entity?) is causing the space-time distortion above it. This human perspective on Gemma's mysteries, though, is not the only one explored in the novel. Suhner, in fact, opens with the thoughts and memories of Tékélam, from the planet Im'shâ, where the conception of space and time and natural laws looks like nothing found on Earth. And yet, Tékélam's people, like humans, are bipedal and intelligent, able to advance technologically far enough to send certain members of their race across the stars. Tékélam's story alternates with Haziel and Ambre's, inviting the reader to compare and contrast these incomprehensibly different perspectives and consider what it would mean for such different species to encounter one another on a planet that means so much to both. When Tékélam flees his planet to escape the cycle of ritual violence into which his people have plunged, he winds up crashing on Gemma (or what his people call "Pad'jé"). He is unintentionally awakened by Kya Stanford, daughter of the head scientist of the experimental physics team. In her teenaged, hormone-fueled rebellion against her father and the constraining conditions of the isolated weather base, she's joined the Children of Gemma and has been sent to Tékélam's crash site to see what she can discover within the crater. Unbenownst to her, this little expedition has woken the alien within, who subsequently makes his painful and desperate way across the Glacier to the very site where the scientists have excavated a series of ancient ruins. Ambre's expedition has other problems, though. The rag-tag militia, which has slowly gained power over the colony and amassed enough weapons and other gear to take over the scientific expedition, declares itself in charge of the scientific team. Its aim is to discover any ancient and powerful alien technology that they can use to extend their power beyond Gemma. And yet the hostile clashes between the scientists and the soldiers pale in comparison to the horror that begins plaguing the expedition soon after it breaks through into the first section of ruins. Scientists who have seemed upbeat and excited about their find suddenly start commiting suicide, with one blowing himself up before an intricately-carved doorway, thereby opening the way into a kind of inner sanctum. All the while, Ambre's dreams have been turning into powerful hallucinations and delusions, with the "Dark Lord" making her sleepwalk to the ruins, even as another, unexplained force tries to tear her away. Once the inner section of the ruins is exposed, the militia's eccentric scientist, who has been trying to translate the alien script found throughout those ruins, becomes, like Ambre, the plaything of whatever dark entity inhabits it. Ambre's subsequent brief and terrifying encounter with Tékélam symbolizes the meeting of human and alien minds. For Tékélam, the alien script is the language of reality, of his people, which he can understand through singing and dancing to its rhythm. But for the humans, it is indecipherable, unless, that is, one has fallen under the sway of the lifeforce that has been caged in the ruins for centuries. Vestiges is at once a work of hard sf, a space opera that spans lightyears and centuries and delves into complicated relationships both within human society and that of Tékélam's people. And yet, it is also a story about the universality of myth, the roles that religion and music play in social formation, and the ways in which the human brain resists processing that which doesn't fit into a worldview fenced in by a four-dimensional understanding of the universe. And this is just Book 1. It's a real shame, then, that Vestiges has yet to find an English-language publisher; but we, the readers, can help change that—by championing it, advocating for it … demanding it. And those of you who can read the novel in the original French can spread the word by writing reviews of it on your own sites or elsewhere. I must also admit to having a selfish reason for wanting this book picked up in the US: I want the next two books translated into English . Vestiges ends on a cliffhanger, and I need to know what happens next. I was lucky enough to get a copy of the English version from the author herself, and now I want more people to share in this exciting reading experience. Like a Gemman colonist trying to break through the formidable ice sheet with a pickaxe, I've barely managed to scratch the surface of this novel in my review. Suhner's work deserves attention in the US and around the world. Let's make that happen. Share this:

Cracks in the sky. Rifts on the ground. Fake burger-restaur

Tuesday, July 10 2018

Cracks in the sky. Rifts on the ground. Fake burger-restaur

By Nathan Grayson on at Cracks in the sky. Rifts on the ground. Fake burger-restaurant mascots in real deserts . All eyes are on Fortnite ’s map right now, and with good reason: It’s the main character of a story that could go just about anywhere. Fortnite’ s battle royale mode barely has a story in the traditional sense. Little is known about the broader context of the game’s candy-coloured murder purgatory; players drop in, drop each other, drop out. But over the course of the game’s last few seasons, developer Epic has revealed the faintest outline of a plot, and despite the lack of a core cast of characters or easily identifiable arcs, it’s made people care . It’s accomplished this by tying nearly every major beat to the map, meaning that each story event comes with earth-shattering consequences. I’ve been thinking a lot lately about this approach to multiplayer storytelling in contrast to that of Overwatch , a game I’ve been addicted to since its release in 2016. Overwatch grafts a much more traditional narrative onto an endless series of battles that aren’t so royale. The game surrounds its 6v6 payload push-offs with vibrant characters, decades-spanning lore, limited-time PVE events, in-game mysteries, CG videos, comics, and more. It’s a lot. Players clearly care about Overwatch ’s world, too, as enough fan fiction and fan art to fill hundreds of ancient Grecian libraries will attest. Unlike Fortnite , though, Overwatch ’s story lacks a focal point. If you ask any given Overwatch player what’s happening right now in the game’s present-day timeline, I’m willing to wager that they’d shrug and, at best, be able to offer up the backstories of a few of their favourite heroes. In-game story events, meanwhile, have been focused on building out backstory even more, but in a largely disconnected fashion that’s difficult to tie into a larger arc unless you’re a dyed-in-the-wool lore nerd. Earlier this year, for example, the Retribution event followed Reaper, McCree, Moira, and Genji through an ordeal in Overwatch ’s past that we’ve been told — not shown — is pivotal. Then we jumped back to the present and got two new heroes entirely unrelated to that event, Brigitte and Hammond. I’ve spoken to friends who took a break from the game for only a few months, and that was enough to set their heads spinning. Blizzard promises that Overwatch ’s storyline will start cohering and moving forward soon , but it’s already been two years. The aforementioned reams of fan fiction and fan art, while surely a sign of Overwatch ’s success, also strike me as an attempt at making sense of it all, deriving order from chaos. Overwatch ’s world and story aren’t even that complicated: there’s just a bunch happening, and in-game events ping-pong between timelines, making it difficult for the game’s whole player base to get invested in any one thing. Fortnite ’s story, on the other hand, is all focal point. Events like last season’s meteor and this season’s rift-a-palooza are steeped in mystery. That might result in a similar confusion if that’s all that was happening, but in Fortnite they’re tied to a concrete end result: map changes. Fortnite has just one map, and over the course of thousands of battles royale (the correct plural; don’t @ me), players have become intimately familiar with it. The rift event, especially, has taken advantage of that, sucking up signs, mascots, and other beloved landmarks one by one to the point that players have been holding in-game ceremonies to mourn them . Without a doubt, this event is more complicated than the last one — there have been super villains , a missile countdown , and an ARG to accompany the map changes — but the map ties it all together. Epic’s approach here is especially notable because while plenty of multiplayer games change their maps, they treat it as a weirdly humdrum thing. Usually, there’s hardly any pomp or circumstance at all—just a quick scribble in the patch notes that an object or path has been moved for balance purposes. That’s so boring! And it underestimates the value of changing a place over time, a failing that’s woefully common in video games. In a game like Fortnite , the map is home. If you mess with somebody’s home, you’d better believe they’ll give a shit about it. Lastly, there’s the temporal element. Fortnite ’s meteor kicked off the previous season, but now it’s in the past. The missile launch signalled the beginning of the current event, but the only way players could see it was if they logged on at a certain time. If the missile just cracked the sky and that was it, you could accuse Epic of manufacturing hype instead of actually trying to do something interesting. But the rifts and ensuing ARG suggest that Epic’s got plenty more cooking. Will the payoff be satisfying? It’s impossible to say. But so far, it’s been a hugely entertaining ride. At this point, I’m actually still more attached to Overwatch ’s world and characters, but I think Fortnite is telling a much more effective video game story, one that seems perfectly crafted around this era of constantly-updating games. In some small ways, like the tiny, varied conversations between characters before matches start, Overwatch leverages the fact that it’s a game people play over and over and over. But it’s mostly been disappointingly clumsy on that front. Put another way, the Bastion and Mei CG videos were ten times more affecting than anything that’s happened in-game. Fortnite , by narrowing its focus and telling a story that leverages constant updates that come part and parcel with multiplayer games in the year 2018, has got a huge chunk of its player base on the edge of their seats. I think everybody can learn from that. Tags:

There are, at last count, 1,537,284 Warhammer games on the

Tuesday, July 10 2018

There are, at last count, 1,537,284 Warhammer games on the

There are, at last count, 1,537,284 Warhammer games on the market, and yet somehow none of them have been in the 4X genre. So hi there, Warhammer 40,000: Gladius - Relics of War . It’s tough to truly innovate in this space, since its fundamentals breed similarity, but while Civilization is the most well-known 4X (eXplore, eXpand, eXploit and eXterminate) game, Relics’ clinical UI and base-building will be more familiar to Endless Legend players . Endless Legend : The Kotaku Review As part of our recent shift in focus, I've been playing (and thus writing) about Civilization… Read more Read The setup for this game is ridiculous, involving (and I’m keeping it brief here) a planet being struck with anomalies then beset by enemies, but then so is every setup for a 40K storyline, I guess. The gist is that you’re on a human planet that’s suddenly crawling with Orks and Necrons (both also playable factions), who are fighting against Space Marines and regular Imperial forces (who are also both playable). None of that explains why you suddenly know nothing of the planet around you, or why you have to re-research the basic units of your very long-established armed forces, but 4X games have rules to play and Relics is too content to abide by them. Advertisement Warhammer may seem a weird fit for this genre, but at a functional level at least, Relics knows how these games works and makes sure to provide that experience, albeit with one major omission (that we’ll get to in a minute). You are certainly exploring, expanding, exploiting and exterminating on a hex-based map, all the while managing resources, construction and production. The one place you will find atmospheric and good-looking art is the game’s splash screens, which come complete with the kind of visuals you expect from the 40K license. But there’s little here to excite . Relics ticks its 4X boxes, reskins the experience to suit the Warhammer license and offers little more. The map is drab and depressing, while units (and their animations) exhibit little of the pomp and flair we associate with such an over-the-top franchise. Advertisement It’s the absence of diplomacy that hurts most though. While I guess it could be argued that there is no diplomacy in the 40K universe, it’s a standard feature in 4X games, and often the only way to inject a little life and personality into proceedings. Its absence strips Relics of much of its potential strategy and depth, and makes every game feel stale and devoid of character. All of which is a bit of a shame, because Relics does have some good ideas scattered around. It attempts to plug the hole left by diplomacy by making combat—especially its use of ranged weaponry, grenades, mind control and melee—a bit more interesting than simply throwing units against one another. Indeed this is one of the better turn-based 40K experiences in recent years on the PC. Relics was developed by Proxy, the studio responsible for Pandora: First Contact , coincidentally another sci-fi 4X game that suffered from a lack of personality. It was published by Slitherine, a company who make a living selling PC strategy games. Advertisement I like Slitherine, who are a bit like a scruffier Paradox. Panzer Corps and Order of Battle are two of the finest strategy series on PC, and BSG Deadlock is fantastic . But their 40K efforts—this is the third game from the property they’ve published, following Warhammer -infused takes on Panzer Corps and XCOM —are falling short. The problem in this case maybe lies with the choice of genre itself. Trying to cram such a bloodthirsty universe into a style of game that generally supports a wider variety of play styles is a mistake at the strategic level, and no amount of ideas in the combat space can make up for that. Relics is trying to give 40K fans the full 4X experience, but all it can offer is some decent turn-based combat.

Photo: Scott Cawthon Yesterday, Twitch streamer Rhemery acc

Tuesday, July 10 2018

Photo: Scott Cawthon Yesterday, Twitch streamer Rhemery acc

By Keoni Nguyen on at Yesterday, Twitch streamer Rhemery accomplished what Five Nights at Freddy’s fans and YouTubers around the world have been trying (and failing) to accomplish these past few weeks — beating a supposedly “unbeatable” mode in Ultimate Custom Night . Today, he was followed by another streamer, Dawko . Ultimate Custom Night , which Kotaku covered last week , was released on June 27, and is considered the final game of the Five Nights at Freddy’s series. It includes a mode that even creator Scott Cawthon himself thought would be impossible: “50/20 Mode” requires the player to survive an entire night in the office against all 50 animatronics at the game’s highest difficulty level, 20. The winning run begins at 11:32:42 of Rhemery’s stream. He began the night with three power-ups: Frigid (sets the starting temperature of the office at 50 degrees instead of 60), 3 Coins (gives you 3 Faz-Coins to start with), and Battery (grants you 2 percent extra power). These power-ups gave Rhemery an upper hand as he seamlessly juggled checking the monitor, flipping on the Fazbear Mask, and opening and closing the vents and doors throughout the night. One minute into the session, he managed to secure a Death Coin, which he then used to swiftly eliminate Funtime Foxy from the roster for the rest of the night. Rhemery continued to to elude the animatronics despite the screen intermittently fading to black, Toy Chica and Toy Bonnie hustling into the office, and Trashgang and Funtime Chica abruptly flashing onto the screen. Admittedly, it was absolutely satisfying to repeatedly hear the animatronics’ failed attempts to get into the office, indicated by thuds against the blocked doors and vents. Rhemery, in the final moments leading up to his win, managed to just barely survive the night with a room temperature of 103 degrees and 2 percent of power left. As the congratulatory music began to roll, Rhemery was shouting from shock and excitement. “Oh my god, I actually did it,” he said, beginning to laugh. “I must be dreaming!” Shortly after the win, Rhemery was crowned “King of Ultimate Custom Night” by the Five Nights at Freddy’s subreddit and was personally congratulated by Cawthon himself. However, all was not well in the community. After Rhemery’s win, viewers began to post comments putting down Dawko , another Twitch streamer who was also attempting to defeat Ultimate Custom Night ’s 50/20 mode, for not being the first person to beat the mode. Some of them even went to his stream, flooding the chat with so much toxicity that his had to walk away. Dawko called the flood of harassment “the worst I’ve ever seen in my life.” Giving the story something of a happy ending, today, in the same stream in which he addressed this experience, Dawko went on to win 50/20 mode , too. Featured image: Scott Cawthon

RCT - UmJammer Lammy (PS1)There’s A New Rock Star in Town.

Tuesday, July 10 2018

RCT - UmJammer Lammy (PS1)There’s A New Rock Star in Town.

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Tuesday, July 10 2018

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Tuesday, July 10 2018

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Tuesday, July 10 2018

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RCT - Tekken 3 (PS1)There are games, and then there’s Tekken 3.

Tuesday, July 10 2018

RCT - Tekken 3 (PS1)There are games, and then there’s Tekken 3.

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